*fk e CI4ICAG0AN February, 1933 Price 35 Cents i^ c^2Ami^A^u WHILE LOOKING INTO THE NEW BuiCK . . . • Now for the interior. Ah, this is beautiful. Rich — in viting- — 'livable as a fine home. Ann will like this. It's big, too — plenty of room. That means a lot to us. How about the instrument board? Handsome, all right, and plainly visible. Big, easily read instruments looking right up at you through the steering wheel. Cigar lighter. And a real ash tray. Wonder what this is? A locked compartment right in the instrument board — a large one, too! Mighty convenient for valuables. Here's Fisher No Draft Ventilation. A marvelous thing, all right. No drafts blowing round your head, causing colds. No foggy windshield or windows. Fresh air for those who want it, with out disturbing other people. This settles the old, old argument about ventilation. Safety Glass, too! Glad to have that. Just look at this upholstery. There couldn't be anything finer or richer. Understand you can have it in broadcloth, whipcord or mohair, whichever you prefer. Everything clean, everything fin ished. No seams showing in the upholstery — they're bound with braid instead. Concealed window curtains. Even the carpets — fine quality and fine fitting. And are these seats comfortable! Seem to fit right into them. Lots of leg room, too. Stretch right out and relax. An inviting foot rest there in back. Also arm rests. Who was it said, "You canna expect to be baith grand and com fortable?" Well, you can be both in this car. A regular home on wheels. Guess we'll have to have one. This very one. Ann deserves a Buick. BUICK GIVES MORE AND BETTER MILES In addition to exceptional beauty and comfort, the new J933 Buick gives more and better miles. It is even more capable and durable than previous Buicks. It will serve you dependably for many years. The twenty new Buick body-types are offered at moderate prices on the convenient G. M. A. C. time payment plan. All are Buicks through and through — with new Bodies by Fisher and Valve- in -Head Straight Fight Engine cushioned in live, resilient rubber to give smoothness with stability. All are fine, economical motor car investments. WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT BUICK WILL BUILD THEM NEW 1933 BUICK XI S7 fyesi&uz/- /Motou l/a/ae, ARISTO ... FIFTH F LO O R . . . YO U N G MODERNS FIELD COMFOPEDIC, FOURTH FLOOR, FIELD NATURE JUNIOR 1/JcA inbo rn, shoes from Field's famous February Sale Every pair of Young Moderns', women's, men's and children's shoes is reduced in this sale which takes place in the shoe departments in the Main Store, the Basement, The Store for Men and the Suburban Stores. With Spring just across the street and the February Shoe Sale offering you the newest fashions in footwear, the sensible thing for you to do is to buy your Spring wardrobe of shoes right now. The February Sale of Shoes is a famous Field event and this year you'll find the quality is still the splendid Field brand, the styles are smart as can be, and the prices are amazingly low. MARSHALL FIELD & COMPANY FEBRUARY, 1933 3 PALM BEACH IN A JAR The good old uplift of Palm Heach isn't lost to those who stay North and use Nina Geranium Cream. A little at night and away goes tin; tired look, the eye- circles, the hard-times effect. A hit in the morning and make-up stays put over a petal-smooth foundation. And your first expenditure is your last — for six whole months of youth and heauty. ROUGE FOR THE ; j^ i& SUPER * * With day, dinner and dance light all on the same schedule, modern girls may trust their cheeks and lips to Nina Rouge. Its transparent glow blends with every skin tone, every costume color -and stays put like younger sister's natural roses. A French wooden box lasts a year. In Chicago MANUEL BROTHERS Toiletries First Floor Contents for F EBRUAR Y 1 THE COCKTAIL HOUR, by Burnham C. Curtis 6 A GUIDE TO CURRENT ENTERTAINMENT 8 TABLES ABOUT TOWN 11 EDITORIAL COMMENT 13 CHICAGOANA, conducted by Donald C. Plant 16 VIKINGS TWAIN, by Paul Stone 17 WHEN CHECAGOU WAS YOUNG, by Louis E. Laflin, Jr. 19 THE BIG PARADE, by Richard Atwater 20 "CASTELL" PORTRAITS, by Calvin Smith 22 PARIS REBOUND, by Texas Guinan 23 DILATORY DIARY, by Courtney Borden 24 MOTORS IN THE MODERN MODE 26 THEATRICAL POTPOURRI, by William C. Boyden 27 ALLAN JONES, by Paul Stone 28 NOAH'S ARK, by Ruth G. Bergman 29 URBAN PHENOMENA, by Virginia Skinkle 30 SUB-URBAN PHENOMENA, by Caroline S. Krum 31 THE TIMES AND THE FAIR, by Milton S. Mayer and A. George Miller 39 TRAIN DOWN AND FRESHEN UP, by Marcia Vaughn 41 THE OLD, OLD ORIENT, by Lucia Lewis 42 HIGH HATS FOR HIGH EVENINGS, by James Bond 43 I LOVE A PARADE, by The Chicagoenne 46 MUSIC HATH FRIENDS, by Robert Pollak THli CHICAGOAN William R. Wlayi.r. tiliror; E. S. Climoki., General M.imiRer is published monthly by The Chicagoan Publishing Company, Martin Qi'ioi.by. President. 407 South Dearborn Street. Chicago, 111. Harrison 1)035. A. E. Holt, Advert i-siiiji Mamixet. New York Office, 1790 Broadway. Los Angeles Office, Pacific States Life Hldn. Pacific Coast Office, Simpson-Rcillv. Bendix Huildint!, Los Angeles; Russ Bld-j., San Francisco. Subscription, S 3.0(1 annually; single copy 3*0. Vol. XIII, No. 7, February, 1933. Copyright, 1933. Entered as second class matter August 19. 1931. at the Post Office at Chka-o, 111., under the act of March 3, 1879. Lrtwinsky Linensand Laces £r//eTrousseau wWeddin^fGift I Chicago's Original Linen Store is rucrw serving Chicago's Third Generation of Brides I TRANSAMERICAN AIRLINES — The Shortest Route to 79 Important Great Lakes Cities Luxurious airliners with heated cabins and radio equipment, provide fast, comfortable, on- time service to South Bend, Detroit, other Michigan points and the East. Eight ships daily fly over the Chicago- Detroit division. Make your next flying trip a Flying Trip — Travel Transamerican. Low fares — direct connections to everywhere in America. 10% reduction on round trip tickets. Phone State 7110 for air travel information and reservations. transamerican Airlines Corp. Division of American Airways THE LINEN STORE INC 118 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE. -OPPOSITE the ART INSTITUTE- Aoic-i4 tfxt -fail/ Pwm Smi Dixejir j% POET has said: "In Cxi all the world there is no more beautiful estuary than the bay of San Diego." A hard-boiled columnist has written: "The environs of San Diego are without paral lel on any coast." Why not a month at Hotel del Coronado, situated on beautiful Coronado Beach just across the bay from San Diego, where California be gan and Mexico begins? Soul for Folder with Rjfes Mel S. Wright, Manner CORONADO BEACH CALIFORNIA The Chicago.** Visit the Shops in the Pittsfield Building Chicago's Fore mo s t PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORES Althoush we devote our major efforts to the accurate com pounding of prescrip tions, our patrons find r.erc a complete stock of approved drug staples as well as any other merchandise which rightfully be longs in a properly conducted, modern pharmacy. WRIGHT LAWRENCE Main Floor, Pittsfield Bldg. Marshall Field Annex, 13th Floor 24 N. Wabash Ave. The PITTSFIELD TAVERN for LUNCHEON 35c to 50c a TEA DINNER 50c to 75c lhli,i„,is r„t,,l - Prompt Servicv \ DKIJGHTRL RENDEZVOUS 1. MIIANCi: OIK MAIN LOBBY BOOKS Periodicals Office Supplies Stationery Fountain Pens Cards and Games Brentano's Booksellers to the World 61 E. Washington Street R andolph 4580 CHICAGO N. w York Washinston CI ¦vel.ind Pittsburgh Hi Udelphi <' Paris Chicago^ leading shop and p r ofe s s ion a I bui Idi ng a few desira ble offices a vail a hie located in the heart of the loop PITTSFIELD BUILDING 55 E. Washington St. (Wabcisfi and Washington Sts„ opposite Fields) F. II \ Boyd en } Alan age?' Always Particular With Your Flower Orders LOOP FLOWER SHOP Corner Washington and Wabash RANDOLPH 2788 Suits Our Best Custom Tailored $45 These suits arc cut and fitted in our own shop and only the finest woolens and trimmings are used. Careful attention is given to your per sonal preferences in all of those "little details" which assure individuality, and make the wearing of tailor-made clothes a pleasure. OVERCOATS Boucles, Llamas, Meltons, Silver- downs — In the New est Models $22.50 $32.50 $42.50 McClive, Dunn & Masters Frankie Masters,Sec. CLOTHIERS FOR MEN 55 E. Washington St. Third Floor Pittsfield Bldg. Franklin 3498 Dearborn 8302 FiiHRUARY, J933 5 HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER'S ORIENTAL BALLROOM What a room for your next party? DISTINCTIVE- A glorious big ballroom. A mar velous spring constructed dance floor with a center panel of glass illuminated by 20C0 subdued multi-colored lights. Novel and unique dancing and seating ar rangements. Spot lights that pa rade all the colors of the rainbow — lighting effects that no other ballroom provides. ECONOMICAL- For dinner-dances, banquets, etc., attractive menus at most reason able rates with no extra rental charge. Menus submitted with out obligation. For dances, meet ings, etc., where no menu is re quired, rentals are surprisingly low. A perfect amplifying system carries t' e softest music, with all its sweetness of tone, to every corner of the room— and even a small orchestra can be given the power and "pep" of a large one. UNIQUE- Here is a room that will help you "put your party over". If you wish, seat your party on the glass panel and dance around them— or vice versa. Use the balcony for the Bridge players. Excellent cuisine. We offer our cooperation in creat ing new party ideas. WALTON PLACE JUST WEST OF MICHIGAN BLVD. millie b. oppenKeimer 1 300 n. state street An Exclusive Address where Fine Apparel May be Selected — Personalized Service Tnilleurs: Tun ;m<l three piece man-tail ored suits with re lated capes and coats are interestiiiKly de veloped of woolly tweeds or KiirUsIi Worsteds. Pinstripes — checks — plaids— Two-tones. Some at $29.50 ambassador west STAGE (Curtains, 8:30 and 2:30 p. m., Matinees Wednesday and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated.) zJICusical DIXIE OH PARADE— Garrick, 64 W. Randolph. Randolph 7679. All-colored revue with more than the usual amount of dancing talent and hot music. THE NEW MOON— Civic Opera House, 20 N. Wacker. Franklin 9810. Greek Evans and Electa Leonard head the cast in a revival of an old favorite. Saturday matinee only. Curtain, 8:15. THE STUDENT PRINCE— Grand Opera House, 119 N. Clark. Cen tral 8240. An able cast in an other revival of an older and pos sibly more favored favorite. TAKE A LOOK— Mandel Hall, the University of Chicago, 57th and University. Midway 0800. The annual revue presented by Mirror, the University of Chicago women's dramatic society. March 3, 4. Curtain, 8:30. Admission, $1.00. 'Drama THE FAMILY UPSTAIRS— Cort, 132 N. Dearborn. Central 0019. Thomas W. Ross in a typical Thomas W. Ross comedy, evidently having something to do with the family upstairs. CAMILLE — International House, 1414 E. 59th Street. Fairfax 8200. The first offering of the recently organized International House Theatre League. Evenings, Febru ary 24, 25; matinee, February 25. Curtains, 8:30 and 2:30. Admis sion, $1.00 and $0.50, evenings: $0.75 and $0.35, matinee. MUSIC WOMAN'S STMPHONT OR CHESTRA OF CHICAGO— Drake Hotel. Sundays at 5 p. m., March 12, April 16. The seventh season. LA TOSCA— Auditorium, 431 S. Wabash. Harrison 6554. With Maria Jeritza, John Charles Thomas, Mario Duca, Vittorio Trcvisan. Benefit Presbyterian Hospital of Chicago. LECTURES STUDENT LECTURE SERVICE— Mandel Hall, the University of Chicago, 57th and University. Midway 0800. Professor Augustc Piccard of the University of Brus sels. Professor Arthur H. Comp- ton, University of Chicago phy sicist and winner of the Nobel Prize, will introduce the speaker. Tuesday evening, March 7. CINEMA CAVALCADE The curtain rises on a new and distinguished cinema age. (Do not fail to see it.) THE KIHG'S VACATION — Im peccable George Arliss in a serene and intrinsically mature perform ance. (By all means.) SECOND HAND WIFE The one about the girl at the office. (Don't bother.) FRISCO JENNT- Ruth Chattcrton as a Barbary Coast Madame X. (If Miss Chattcrton stirs you.) SHE DONE HIM WRONG Mac West establishes a new high — or low, as you will — for screen abandon . (Attend.) TONIGHT IS OURS— That queen- and-commoner thing again, with modern accoutrements. (If it still amuses you.) THE KID FROM SPAIN — The loudest and funniest of Eddie Cantor's loud and funny films, (See and hear.) NO OTHER WOMAN— Charles Bickford again learns the priceless treasure that is a good woman's love. (In about that kind of dialogue.) NO MAN OF HER OWN— A gay little entertainment with no rela tion to the title. (Step in if it's handy.) HOT PEPPER— Lupe Velcz adds zest to the probable last of the Scrgt. Quirt-Captain Flagg vulgar ities. (Probably you've had enough.) SILVER DOLLAR— Edward G. Robinson gives a sterling perform ance in a splendid production of a gaudy chapter in the giddy history of the nation. (See it.) THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL TEN — A credible and creditable Oriental drama. (Yes.) SON-DAUGHTER Another. (Of course.) TABLES Luncheon — Dinner — Later MAILLARD'S - — 308 S. Michigan. Harrison 1060. One of the Town's institutions and an admirable lunch eon, tea or dinner choice. LA LOUISIANE--120 E. Pearson. Delaware 0860. Gaston of the Al- ciatores, famous restaurateurs, has reopened his dining room and is again offering the superb dishes for which he is so well known. CAPE COD ROOM— Drake Hotel. Lake Shore Drive at Michigan. Superior 2200. Everything you can think of, and several other things, in the way of marine foods. And a lot of Cape Cod atmosphere. ST. HUBERT'S OLD EHGLISH GRILL — 316 Federal. Webster 0770. God save our gracious St. Hubert's! GRATLING'S- 410 N. Michigan. Wabash 1088. The critical tastc< of the clientele give unnccded stimulus to the chef. PICCADILLY — 410 S. Michigan. Harrison 1975. Special tea service — famous Piccadilly sandwiches, muffins toasted, marmalades, salads. cakes and ices. Luncheon and dinner served both a la carte and table d'hote. PITTSFIELD TAVERN- 55 E. Washington. State 4925. A delight ful place for luncheon and tea while shopping, and for dinner afterward. NINE HUNDRED -900 N. Michi gan. Delaware 1187. Excellent cuisine and new Winter Terrace is open for nightly dinner dancing. RICKETT'S— 2727 N. Clark. Di- versey 2322. The home of the famous strawberry waffle whether it be early or late. RED STAR INN--1528 N. Clark. Delaware 3942. Astonishingly good victua's prepared and served in the customary German manner. LE PETIT GOURMET 615 N. Michigan. Superior 1184. Some thing of a show place alwavs well attended by the better people. Fine Furniture and Objects of Art from the estate of MISS MARIAN GHEEN also a large selection of DECORATIVE OBJECTS including \Y a 1 1 p a p c r s , Old Wallpaper Borders and 1800 yards of Fab rics from the collection of MISS GHEEN, INC. will he offered at an unrestricted PUBLIC SALE Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday Feb. 15-16-17-18 2 P. M. Each Day at GRANT'S ART GALLERIES 25 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE e x h i b i t i o n FEBRUARY 13 & 14 AND EACH DAY UNTIL TIMEOFSALE For that cake you _s threatened wM. to make MIXMASTER A Whole Staff of Servants No more idle throats! You'll ACTUALLY MAKK those featlicr-lisht angel food cakes and that velvet-smooth mayonnaise AND F1NP IT FUN with this marvel. And when the chicl wants some lime juice, for a round of Tom Oollins's, he'll let Mixmaster do the juicing. You see Mixmaster has a variety of talents a perfect c<js: heater, cream whippcr, pnuie masher, salad maker, drink mixer, and s. forth, ad infinitum. The mixer that does iiki cause a disturbance in radio reception. I: comes complete with 2 lovelv i>reen howl-. juicer, salad oil-dropper, for ONLY StS._v Many attachments available at small e\t: > charge. Buy Mixmaster at electric shops, d>' partment stores. If not there, write ("hic.iC' Flexible Shaft Oompanv. 5577 Roosevelt Road. Chicago. A}, years mating QUALITY products. Mixmaster is one ol unhewn THE iBESTf ELECTRIC APPLIANCES MADE The Chicagoan 3520 Sheridan Road (Furnished and Unfurnished) 3-6 Rooms Belmont Harbor An address bespeaking quiet dignity, culture and refinement . . . Every mod ern home convenience of fered . . . Maid service if desired . . . Overlooking Lincoln Park and the Lake. Phone: Bittersweet 3722. 1263 Pratt Boulevard (Furnished and Unfurnished) 2-3-4 Rooms Rogers Park Luxuriously Furnished . . . All the warmth, tasteful color and artistic place ment of furnishings and hangings done by ranking interior decorators. Unfurnished . . . Delight ful room arrangement, spa cious carpeted living rooms, large dinettes, ultra modern kitchens, ample closet space. Phone: Briar- gate 0300. Hotel Orlando 2371 East 70th St. (Furnished) 1-4 Rooms ? South Shore Finely Furnished Pleasing room arrangement, com pletely furnished large rooms, ample closets, gas and light included. Full hotel service. Tea Room . . . One of South Shore's most delightful eating places . . . reasonably priced excellent foods. Phone: Plaza 3500. make it a pleasant adventure to find your new home — Simply tell us your desires in the selection of your new apartment home — which section of the city you prefer, the number of rooms, their appointments, conveniences and rental range. Then our highly individualized service sifts out the really distinctive apartments for you. This service is cost-free. The Shoreham 3318 Sheridan Road (Furnished) 1-2-3-4 Rooms ? Yacht Harbor Facing Lincoln Park and the Lake. Harboring a truly delightful home pri vacy combined with the complete service of the smart hotel . . . Large, spa cious apartments beauti fully furnished . . . delight ful dining room offering excellent table d'hote and also a la carte service at all hours. Bittersweet 6600. 1337 Fargo Avenue (Unfurnished) ^ A^ Sheridan-Grace Apartments 3800 Sheridan Road n m ¦»•• m !» it 3-4-5 Rooms ? Rogers Park Atmosphere: A home of distinction, comfort and convenience ... 13 story fireproof building at the lake, offering the utmost in atmosphere and service . . Excellent transportation . . Rentals include gas, elec tricity and refrigeration . . Switchboard, elevator serv ice. Phone : Briargate 6000 (Unfurnished) 6-7-8 Rooms ? Belmont Harbor Matchless . . . Side by side with smartness and loca tion . . . the privacy of the exclusive town home . . . Spacious rooms . . . charm ing appointments . . . every worthwhile modern convenience and service . . . Overlooking Lincoln Park. Phone: Lake View 3830. The Gothic 6529 Kenwood Ave. w A. W?-^$ I l iSiH'«ip S**k !,"Frli— n*1 ¦ "ifcisn (Furnished) 1-2-4 Rooms ? Woodiawn Reflecting the charm of a fine home . . . Unusually appealing appointments, readily lending themselves to your own home-making ideas . . . Maid service . . . Ample closet space . . . Newly decorated. I. C. transportation. Phone: Plaza 3060. 1039 Hollywood Avenue (Furnished and Unfurnished) 2-3-4 Rooms Edge water Quiet, Residential Street. Finely appointed apart ments with above the aver age furnishings and maid service . . . Unfurnished units with same high de gree of service. Maid serv ice available. Switchboard. 24 hour elevator service. V/2 blks. to "L". Lon. 3037. 1400 Lake Shore Drive liNhed) 4-5-6 Rooms ? Gold Coast Smart Chicago's Town House ... A fine home near the Loop, overlook ing the Lake, Lincoln Park Extension and beach . . . Tinted tile baths, showers, cedar-lined wardrobes, cab inet radiators. Surpris ingly moderate rentals. Phone: Whitehall 4180. All With: Select Locations Smart Appointments Nearness to Parks and Beaches Hi3h Speed Transport ation to the Loop CENTRAL RENTAL SERVICE A TRUE PUBLIC SERVANT 69 W. WASHINGTON ST. DEARBORN 7740 February, 1933 7 SANDOR. PRESENTS ANOTHER OF HIS ESCUTCHEONS — THE ABOVE TO ERNEST R. GRAHAM. FRED HARVEY'S— Union Station. The usual wonderful foods and the regular Harvey service. THE SAN PEDRO— 918 Spanish Court, Wilmette. Authentic old- tavern setting. Food that pleases North Shorites who gather here. There are some famous specialties. B/G SAHDWICH SHOPS— There are eleven locations in the Down town section. Tempting foods promptly served. CHARM HOUSE— 800 N.Michigan. Superior 4781. Brings to Chi cago the same food that has been enjoyed and so well served in Charm House in Cleveland for five years. JOSEPH H. BIGGS— 50 E. Huron. Superior 0900. Private dining room and ballroom for social func tions by appointment. Fifty years of uninterrupted reputation for choice food and service. 1400 RESTAURANT— 1400 Lake Shore Drive. Whitehall 4180. Well-cooked food at reasonable prices combine to add enjoyment for the diner out. Seven course dinner on week days, $0.75; dinner de luxe, Sundays and Holidays, $1.00; also a la carte service. HUTLER'S— 20 S. Michigan, 310 N. Michigan, PalmoliveBIdg. You're always near one or another no matter where you happen to be. EITEL'S— Northwestern Station. Of what importance is the scarcity of good restaurants in the neighbor hood when there Eitel's is? L'AIGLON— 22 E. Ontario. Dela ware 1909. A grand place to visit. Handsomely furnished, able cater ing, private dining rooms and, now, lower prices. MAISOH CHAPELL— 1142 S. Michigan. Webster 4240. Where those who are connoisseurs of ex cellent French cuisine assemble for the pleasure of an evening CIRO'S— 18 W. Walton. Superior 6907. Luncheon, tea and dinner served in the Sea-Glade. One of the Town's unusual dining places and certainly not to be missed. VASSAR HOUSE— Diana Court, 540 N. Michigan. Superior 6508. Here you may have luncheon, tea, dinner and even breakfast in a most modern setting. There's the lovely Diana Court, too. CASA DE ALEX— 58 E. Delaware. Superior 9697. Castilian catering and atmosphere — you can almost hear the castantes click in your coffee. EARLT AMERICAN TEA SHOP - -664 Rush. Delaware 5494. Real old fashioned service and food; bridge breakfasts and buffet dinners every Monday — and the antiques. HARDING'S COLONIAL ROOM — 21 S. Wabash. Famous for its old fashioned American cuisine and variety of menu. RIVEREDGE -On the Des Plaines River, route 22, '/£ mile east of Milwaukee Avenue at Half Day. Rather a trip, but worth it to get awav from it all. The cuisine is excel ent THE VERA MEGOWEN TEA ROOMS- -501 Davis, 512 Main, Evanston. A smart dining spot where Evanstonians and north- sidcrs like to meet and eat. A BIT OF SWEDEN— 1011 Rush. Delaware 1492. European cooking and atmosphere. Famous for its smorgasbord. HENRICI'S — 71 W. Randolph. Dearborn 1800. When better coffee is made Henrici's will still be without orchestral din, ROCOCO HOUSE- \ 61 E. Ohio. Delaware 3688. Swedish service and food stuffs. You'll leave in that haze of content that surges over a well-fed diner. JAC&UES— 180 E. Delaware. Dela ware 0904. A peculiarly intrigu ing French dining room where the sweet amenities of service and cuisine prevail. BRADSHAW'S— 620 N. Michigan. Delaware 2386. A pleasant spot for luncheon, tea or dinner. Quiet and restful, and the catering is notable. THE SPANISH TEA ROOM— 126 S. Washington St., Naperville. On State route No. 18 (Ogden Ave.). Noted for its famous home cook ing. cJ3 Coming — Noon — Nigh t HOTEL SHERMAN— Clark at Ran dolph. Franklin 2100. Always fun at College Inn, particularly Wednesday (Theatrical) Nights. Ben Bernie, the incomparable Old Maestro, and his band. Mr. Braun leads the way. And those Saturday nights at the Bal Tabarin. DRAKE HOTEL— Lake Shore Drive at Michigan. Superior 2200. The new Gold Coast Room is grand. Luncheons, $1.00. Dinner, $1.50. Clyde ("The Real") McCoy and his orchestra play. Cover charge, after nine, $1.00 week nights; $1.50 Saturdays. PALMER HOUSE— State, Monroe, Wabash. Randolph 7500. In the Emp'r£ Room an extensive, choice, 7 'Course De Luxe Dinner, $1.50; music by the famous Ensemble which broadcasts over "W-G-N." In the Fountain Room, dinner at $1.25. On Friday, in the Empire Room, Special Shore Dinner, pre senting the utmost in seafood cuisine, $1.50. COHGRESS HOTEL- -Michigan at Congress. Harrison 3800. The Joseph Urban Room, new and splendid, and without doubt the most beautiful supper room any where, is popular with Vincent Lopez and his orchestra after 10 p. m. Strictly formal Saturday evenings. EDGEWATER BEACH HOTEL— 5300 block- -Sheridan Road. Mark Fisher and his orchestra play in the Marine Dining Room, concert and dancing, with dancing week-day evenings until 12:00 o'clock; Fridays until 1 :00 a. m.; Saturdays, forma', until 2:00 a. m. Dinner $1.50. No cover charge to dinner guests except Saturday nights when there is a charge of $1.00. Dance admission week- nights, $1.00; Saturday nights $1.50. HOrEL LA SALLE— La Salle at Madison. Franklin 0700. Dell Coon and his orchestra play in the B'uc Fountain Room. Dinner, $1.00. Saturday nights, $1.50. NEW BISMARCK HOTEL— 111 W. Randolph. Central 0123. Art Kassel and his melodious or chestra provide the music for din ner and supper dancing from 7:00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m.; later on Saturday. Dinners, $1.50 and $2.00. No cover charge. STEVEHS HOTEL— 730 S. Mich igan. Wabash 4400. George Dev- ron and his band play in the main dining room. Dinner, $1.00. No cover charge. LAKE SHORE DRIVE HOTEL— 181 Lake Shore Drive. Superior 8500. Rendezvous of the town notables and equally notable for cuisine and service. Luncheon, 65c. Dinner, $1.25. Theodore is maitrc. HOTEL BELMONT— Sheridan Road at Belmont. Bittersweet 2100. Superb cuisine and quite perfect continental service in a most re fined dining room. Blue Plate dinner, $1.00. Other dinners, $1.50 and $2.00. ST. CLAIR HOTEL— 162 E. Ohio. Superior 4660. The new dining room is now open, with its con tinental Assorted Appetizer Bar, new appointments, decorations and indirect lighting effects. Dinners from $0.80 to $1.10. Luncheons from $0.50 to $0.75. EASTGATE HOTEL— 162 E. On tario. Superior 3 580. A particu larly fine dining room with alert service and excellent cuisine. Din ners from $0.60 to $1.00. THE GRAEMERE— 3330 Washing ton Blvd. Van Buren 7600. In keeping with the tone of lovely Graemere, its dinner rendezvous has taken hold. It is now recog nized as the finest on the West Side. ORLAHDO HOTEL- -2371 E. 70th St. Plaza 3500. One of South Shore's most delightful tea rooms; reasonably priced, excellent foods. HOTEL KNICKERBOCKER— 163 E. Walton. Superior 4264. One of the outstanding ba'lrooms of the Town and smaller private party rooms, too. The cuisine is excep tional. In the main dining room, dinner, $1.00 and up; in the Cof fee Shop, $0.90. GEORGIAN HOTEL— 422 Davis Street. Greenleaf 4100. Fine serv ice and foods. Where Evansto nians and near-northsiders are apt to be found dining. PEARSON HOTEL— 190 E. Pear son. Superior 8200. Here you will find all the niceties in menu and appointments that bespeak re finement. HOTEL WINDERMERE— E. 56th St. at Hyde Park Blvd. Fairfax 6000. Famous throughout the years as a delightful place to dine. Two dining rooms; no dancing. Dinners, $2.00, $1.50 and $1.00. EAST END PARK— Hyde Park Blvd. at 53rd St. Fairfax 6100. A popular dining place on the southside. Table d'hote dinner, $1.00. THE CHURCHILL— 1255 N. State. Whitehall 5000. You really ought to try the home-cooked meals at this inviting dining room that spe cializes in hors d'oeuvres. Lunch- con, $0.50. Dinners, $1.00; Sun days. $0.85, Sunday evenings, $1.25. THE SHOREHAM— 3318 Lake Shore Drive. Bittersweet 6600. The dining room is operated by Mrs. Look, whose name is synony mous witb good food. Serving table d'hote and a la carte at all hours. SENECA HOTEL— 200 E. Chest nut. Superior 2380. The service and the a la carte menus in the Cafe are hard to match, no matter how meticulous the diner may be. Table d'hote dinner, $1.50. CHICAGO BEACH HOTEL— 1660 Hyde Park Blvd. Hyde Park 4000. A pleasant place with an ample menu and alert service. Conven ient for the southside diners-out especially. Dinners, $1.50 and $2.00. SHORELAND HOTEL— 5454 South Shore Drive. Plaza 1000. The splendid Shorelnnd cuisine and hospitality are a delight to south- side diners-out. Several reasonably priced dinners. Dusk Till Dawn CHEZ PAREE— Fairbanks Court at Ontario. Delaware 1655. The newest spot in town and hand somely decorated. Ben Pollak and his music with Doris Robbins. The lovely Francis Williams heads the floor show. VANITY FAIR — Broadway at Grace. Buckingham 3254. Good floor show. Cliff Winehill is master of ceremonies and he could easily double for Jimmy Durante. Charlie Straight and his band play. No cover charge, but $2.00 minimum charge Saturdays. TERRACE GARDENS — Morrison Hotel, 79 W. Madison. Franklin 9600. Al Kvale and his orches tra and a floor show. And there's the famous Morrison kitchen. FROLICS— 18 E. 22nd St. Victory 7011. Texas Guinan and her Guinan Gang and Dick Rock's orchestra. GRAND TERRACE -3955 South Parkway. Douglas 3600. Earl Hines and his hovs have gone on a tour but they'll be back. Mean while Erskine Tate and his band play. KIT-KAT KLUB— 606 N. Clark. Delaware 0421. Where you can dance and dine till breakfast time. Freddie Janis and his orchestra and a better than ordinary floor show. No cover charge. BLACKHAWK- -1 39 N. Wabash. Dearborn 6262. Hal Kemp and his orchestra play. Service is alert and Blackhawk cuisine has always been known as perfect. THE PLATGROUND— 7th and Wabash. Carl Lorrain and his orchestra ;<nd a floor show headed hv Eddie Clifford. PARAMOUNT — 16 E. Huron. Delaware 0426. Mary Nolan of the screen and stage heads the floor show. Sid Lang and his orchestra play. No cover charge. The Chicagoan |COUR.TatONTARIOST. 2 Blocks East of Boul. Mich. A Glorified Night Club that will amaze von with its charm and beauty- .azzling but refined — Our club enthus iastically acclaimed — provides an un usual setting for dinner -we are sure its character and price will please you. M J. Fritzel, Managing Director. (Paflfi£ FOR A GRAND EVENING THE ANSWER IS L'AIGLON French Creole cuisine at its finest. Our masterly dishes are famous all over the country. Jack Page and bis orchestra en tertain you nightly. Dancing from six to two. And prices down to 1933 levels! Luncheon, fifty cents. Dinner, one dollar. A la carte prices cor respondingly reasonable. The ta in- ,. '"am. merican TEA SHOP ''J'1 fashioned service and food I UXCnr, v Cimrm,n« '"'mo atmosphere UAir/»INNER—$i.oo_$l.25-$1.50 Bridirfy~ Brea-kfast or ,)i"1"''- ... . g< lnsfuction included $1.00 ' <7>/ie«<? /or reservation /o,. .^^z,,/ />„,.,/„ Deia JoDITH T- SHEPHERD Delaware 5494-0842 664 Rush $treet torn. v ao° . \ood- c0o«* * se^ce'^aVe sup so SP"*13* L-SW 0',n"W roo«°* w^JS s ;::¦ FEBRUARY, 1933 MARTHA WEATHERED suits are chosen for important occasions because oi their style preeminence and the read iness with which they conlorm to one s litfure as a result ol solt tailoring an important leature ol all our tailored suits and coats. lovely spring clothes are now ready for your selection 10 GOWNS SUITS COATS MILLINERY SPORTSWEAR MARTHA WEATHERED SHOPS THE DRAKE HOTEL AND 950 NORTH MICHIGAN The ChicagoaH ITH publication of this issue The Chicagoan completes six years of faithful devotion to the civilised interests of Chicago and Chicagoans. Under certain imaginable circumstances this, then, would be a suitable occasion for editorial celebration, for dilatory reminiscences and smug recital of trials, triumphs and trivialities punctuating a period of pleasant and not wholly unprofitable endeavor. But rigorous February, 1933, is not conducive to com placency. Too many poor devils are dying. We are far less proud than grateful, and far more encouraged than satisfied. If The Chicagoan has been able to negotiate in its tender years the shoals now dropping astearn, we can marshal no misgivings as to its destiny come fair weather. Six years is not a great while, but the last three of our six have been eventful years in journalism. The shores of the Fourth Estate are littered with battered hulks of once noble vessels. The local port is typical. Six years ago a Chicagoan chose his daily newspaper from a fairly well matched field of six. Today, unless it be Saturday, when only four are published, five scramble for his pennies. The Journal and the Post are gone, gobbled up by dat ol1 dabil K[ews, and the Times, seeking its own audience, does not fill their places. Six years ago The Tribune came out majestically in three well iden tified sections — frequently four — and the Herald- Examiner gave brisk battle, matching feature with feature, name with name. Competition waxed keen and readers were entertained. The Tribune has gone in for cooking recipes and the Herald-Examiner for women's fashions The staid, literate J^ews of '27 hails its "33 readers with front page streamers naming the winner of the seventh at Caliente. The florid American that dripped gang gore and serialised romance upon the laps of homebound stenographers is effeminate with society chit-chat and fat with politics. The rule is any-reader-in-a-storm and devil- take-the-intelligent. It's been hard sailing, mates, and censure is not in us. Again, our principal emotion is gratitude. So much for the first six years. The first was the liveliest, the sixth the most interesting on a dozen counts, but the seventh is inspiring. Nineteen-thirty-three is Chicago's year. Already the world is Fair- conscious. Two great dates engage the mind of the American citizen, March 4 and June 1. On March 4 a great man comes to the greatest opportunity any man has had in memory. On June 1 a Worlds Fair comes to prove the indomitable ascendency of mankind over material resistance and a substantial contingent of mankind comes to Chicago. The Chicagoan asks no better deal than this. The Chicagoan will not sell '33 short. 'T'he Chicagoan World's Fair Book is keeping us up nights. Mr. A Mayer's fleet typewriter rattles its restless way through the mounting mass of indispensable detail. Mr. Miller's competent camera clicks a constant accompaniment to the march of the master builders busy on the lakefront. By letter and 'phone inquirers con found us with requests for information — what will the book contain? — when will it be published? — how much will it cost? — will there be a private edition? — can orders be placed in advance? All this is very disturbing, encouraging and informative. It keeps us up nights but we love it. Meanwhile, presses roll merrily on turning out books about Chicago. Within its century the Town has been beneficiary and victim of more printer's ink per capita and square mile than any other metropolis on this or any continent. Chicago is what journalists call good copy. Approach of A Century of Progress Exposition makes it especially good copy just now and, at some risk of overdoing the matter, publishers are racing to the bookstalls with scarcely dried volumes, brochures and pamphlets extolling the Fair and the Town. Thus far the Fair and the Town have had no cause to be other than gratified by the attention received. Almost without exception, bookmen whose works have been brought out are honest writers inspired by what they have seen and intent upon its telling. Miss Wilbur has decreed the addition of Henry Raymond Hamilton's The Epic of Chicago to her (and your) Chicago shelf. Now, on the heels of Paul T. Gilbert's Chicago's Accomplishments and Leaders, noted in this space last month, comes Henry Justin Smith's wholly unheralded Chicago's Great Century. Miss Wilbur has not decreed the addition of Mr. Smith's book to her Chicago shelf, yet, for the good reason that we intercepted her copy en transit and, after reading it, decided that confiscation ought to be an editorial prerogative if it isn't. Chicago's Great Century is Smith at his best, the sternly concise, unsentimental, exact stater of facts, and Smith at his best is approximately perfect when the work is of this character. If Miss Wilbur will permit us to venture our inexpert critique, Chicago's Great Century is one of possibly three books your Chicago shelf will never be complete without. One of the other two is The Chicagoan World's Fair Book, of course, and the third is your personal choice of the several hundred others that have been written. TN a then imposing structure at Huron and Michigan, now the ¦*¦ interior decorating establishment of T. Barrett Smith, a tall, gaunt gentleman named Lincoln is said to have marshaled the forces that nominated him for the presidency in the Wigwam convention. In a centrally located quarter of the now enclosed lakefront a meticulously reconstructed Rutledge Tavern prepares to remind World's Fair visitors that Lincoln was, if not technically a Chicagoan, strikingly a Chicago figure. The Town makes a tremendous effort, executed in ubiquitous statue and story, to identify the Emancipator with itself. Until this year, The Chicagoan has contributed to the tradition each February by picture and story. This year the mockery of it all was too much for us. Unfortunately, Lincoln did not see fit to include among his many public services a term as mayor of the Illinois metropolis. This seems to be a favorite oversight of otherwise distinguished public men. It is possible, of course, that a really good man could not attract the required number of votes to be elected, but eternal hope springs to dispute this assumption. We decline to believe that Chicago really wants what it gets, administratively, any more than we choose to believe that it will be content forever to forge its unnecessarily diffi cult destiny without benefit of emancipation. The Union was about as old as Chicago is when it found its Lincoln. We do not despair. THE mysterious gentlemen who determine tax rates, by processes incomprehensible to us and quite possibly to themselves, arc in the headlines again with light barrages preparatory to the bad news. So are learned gentlemen of the bench, whose well timed utterances on the status of partially withheld payments tend to dispel any remnant of suspicion on the part of property owners that they might not better have put their money in the market, or on a good long-shot at the track, after all. In splendid sequence, so well ordered seems the machinery, news columns of the daily press exploit an alleged irregularity in the conduct of an enterprise sub scribed to by several thousand citizens in the not incredible belief that ownership of real estate in these parts is not per se an offense against public policy punishable by fine or confiscation or both. We do not believe a Lincoln is required to detect a flaw in this picture. Detection of the flaw is, of course, only the beginning of the job. Unversed as we are in these matters, we venture no guess as to what the second step toward relief may be. But we need not be versed to guess that Professor Merriam has been charitable in his analysis of the situation. Professor Merriam did not challenge the intent of the tax men. Bad as he shows the system to be, we can not forget that, once upon a time, it was possible to own real estate in Chicago, under that system, without experiencing a practical nulli fication of values at the hands of the tax board. Times are hard, but the way of the property owner is harder. And hardest of all, we suspect, are the mysterious gentlemen named above. TF the two items immediately preceding have seemed ill tempered "*¦ and unbecoming a sedate journal of monthly issuance, turn to Mr. Pollak's observations on the Friends of Music for a fairer picture of Chicago people. If your interest in music is less keen than theirs, read Mr. Mayer's article in answer to questioners as to how a luxury like the Fair can be achieved in a depression. These are pictures of the Chicago to which The Chicagoan has been faithful these six lively years and to which its readers are devoted. This is the Chicago worthwhile, the Town behind the grime and graft of transitory officialdom, the metropolis of the Middle West and, by a thousand tokens, ultimately the cultural capital of modern civilization. We always grow a little dizzy on this theme, wherefore we desist forth with. A more comprehensive treatment of the topic, with all hands on deck, is promised with issuance of our March or Anniversary number. -^OHMMttSK Where Packard and Naiure fight it out Here, in this desert at the Packard Proving Grounds, Packard engineers lay to rest any doubts that Packard is America's sturdiest automobile. For here Packards are pitted against the cruelest enemy Nature ever created to torture a motor car. Here Packards plough for days, hub -deep in sand. Every new mechanical development must survive this third degree' ' before it is finally embodied in the Packard. For Packard knows that if there is any weakling part, this ordeal will bring it to light. Once revealed, Packard en gineers can study the cause — and learn how to make the Packard still stronger. In this desert, too, the strength of competitive cars is tested. And Packard must surpass their record every time. Nor is this the only Packard test of strength. Before the present Packard transmission was incorporated in the car, it was run on a dynamometer under peak load for 350 hours— com parable to driving the car up a hill 2500 miles high and 10,000 miles long. Au tomotive engineers had said that if a transmission could stand 150 hours of such torture without flying to pieces, it would be a miracle. Yet at the end of 350 hours, the Packard transmission was still operating perfectly. Such strength is to be found in every part of today's Packards. They stand, we believe, as the greatest cars America has ever seen. Does that sound like an exaggera tion? Accept this offer and prove to yourself that it isn t! Go to your Packard showroom, drive one of the new Packards over roads you know by heart. Compare it with every other fine car 1933 can offer you. We know then there will be just one car you will really want to own ... a Packard. PACKARD ASK THE MAN WHO OWNS ONE The Packard Eight . . from $2150 at Detroit The PackardlSuper-Eight from $2750 at Detroit The Packard Twelve . from $3720 at Detroit The Chicagoan Chicagoana Annotations and Comments of Sorts Picked Up About the Town Conducted by Donald P l a n t THE "Buy American" campaign, spon sored by the eminent journalist Mr. Hearst for the purpose of spreading love and kisses among nations, has had sev eral developments since we first took note of it on these pages — last month, that was. There is, however, some doubt that the aver age housewife and mother is buying Amer ican manganese for the baby at ten cents straight when she can get Russian manganese at three for a quarter. But the Hearst papers are not down hearted. The Hearst papers are never down hearted. A gentleman connected with the Herald and Examiner, who says he knows, re ports that the Hearst papers are printed on Canadian pulp. Be that as it may, or may not, there is no getting around the American ism that dominates the "special features" page which faces the editorial page in prac tically all the Hearst papers (opposite-edi torial page, it's called in the trade). The writers appearing therein, not daily, perhaps, but pretty regularly, are, as we remember them: Oliver Hereford, Beatrice Hereford, Ford Madox Ford, Rebecca West, Bruno Lessing (with a St. Cloud or Paris date line), G. K. Chesterton, Aldous Huxley, Mary Borden (of England), Anthony Gibbs, Havelock Ellis, and (though we're not posi tive we've seen this one), Virginia Woolf. Charles Hanson Towne, the editor of the page, sounds like an Englishman, but isn't. Perhaps the best one yet was the short lived order to all Herald and Examiner tele phone operators to answer calls with, "Good morning. The Herald and Examiner advises you to Buy American." After three days of this, the H and E 'phone girls had gone almost crazy, and craziness impairs the effi ciency of telephone operators, too, so the scheme was abandoned. And now the Herald and Examiner advises you to Buy American all over the sidewalks. If a tough -looking guy breaks into your house at midnight and shakes you gentlv and whispers in your ear, "Mr. Hearst told me to tell you to Buy American," you'll know it's all right. liuy American Ball ANYWAY, Society and the Arts have taken up Buy American. The annual ball of the Pen and Pencil Club, which takes place this year on Saturday, March 4, in the Gold Coast Room of the Drake, will be a Buy American Ball. There will be a Street of All Nations showing the products of for eign born American citizens, and the booths which display these wares will be presided nver by attendants in their colorful native costumes. A program of acts by radio and stage stars will run through the evening, in terspersed with dancing. And at midnight there will be a fashion show of American fashions followed directly by a dinner served in the buffet manner for which the Drake is becoming famous. The Pen and Pencil Club is a unique or ganization of both men and women engaged in the arts — music, painting and literature, to which the theatre and dancing have re cently been added. It has interested itself in promoting the drive for memberships in the Temple of Music, the project sponsored by Mrs. Waller Borden. At the last Sunday Ham and Egg breakfast at the Drake, Mrs. Borden was the guest of honor and by her enthusiastic speech for the Friends of Music aroused the interest of the Pen and Pencil Club members in this drive. Reservations for ringside tables, at no extra charge, are pouring in rapidly and it is ex pected at least a thousand people will be there. These reservations are being made at the Club headquarters in the Drake, where Mrs. James Claflin is in charge. cBottled Aqua CEVERAL years ago some one, referring to ^ our great Lake Michigan's drinking water, bon-moted, "There's certainly been a lot of water in our chlorine lately." Two years later R. H. L. repeated the obversation. Which brings us up to now, and there's still a lot of chlorine in our water, or vice versa, if you want to stick to the original statement. The Sanitary District people don't do any thing about it, either, haven't for years, except pour in more chlorine. Maybe it's the only thing they can do, and maybe somebody's uncle makes or mines (whatever it is they do to get the element) chlorine. And even when the water doesn't need chlorine for a few minutes, it's terribly murky and smudgey. It isn't that we're indignant or anything like that about it, nor are we zealously desirous of do ing any crusading, but the fact (and the chlorine) , remains that our lake water makes "all right, professor, but how do you know they're not married?" just about the lousiest kind of gin, to say nothing of tea and coffee and ice cubes. And tap-water highballs are getting quite impos sible to down. You can mask juniper with any number of little additions, but we haven't yet discovered anything that'll cut chlorine. We asked our druggist what the devil to do about it. He suggested that we avoid any complicated chemistry, though he admitted that there were several things that could be done, and use bottled water. So that was how we happened to be seen trudging home one evening with a large bottle of Corinnis tucked under our arm. It made the juniper much happier and the alcohol seemed pleased, too. We'd like to take our baths in it, in bottled water, we mean, but that's rather out of the question. Anyway, it's a much less spirit- blighted domestic establishment ours. The bird seems to sing with more lusto and gusto; the dog doesn't turn up her nose at her water dish any more, nor beg for milk or White Rock. The ice cubes freeze minutes faster, we think, though we haven't got around to timing them. And we find ourselves delighting in our head-cold, because it's ever so much nicer taking our head-cold capsules now. We aren't using nearly so many lemons, have stopped squeezing the rinds dry and would get out our skates and go ice-skating (if there were any ice), except that we're afraid the Sanitary District's chlorine would ruin our untried but tempered blades, and you can't skate on frozen bottled water. Our druggist is a smart man. '93 Ha?igover TEFT over from Columbian Exposition days, ¦*-^ at the Fifty-seventh Street entrance to Jackson Park, is a rambling cluster of wooden small stores that were thrown together over night for the Other World's Fair. The few shops surviving the end of that glorious sum mer, when anyone from the Infanta to an occupant of Room 202 was perhaps a cus tomer, quietly departed during the hard win ter of '94. Some of the stores settled askew into the cinder-coated quicksand, others hunched themselves front or back, and that jerry-built bleakness peculiar to the architec tural march of Chicago assumed sway with the advent of the Pullman strike. Except for smoke coming in greater or less degree from the chimneys, by will of theory or in accordance with world-wide economic laws, and window curtains, the color and texture of which diverge as much as the aesthetic urges of the personalities within, nothing about these buildings has changed since '93. No doubt there was a discoverer who pio neered the taking over of this perfect site for a Bohemian boom development, comprising as it did the advantages of location amid the then crumbling glories of the City White together with the absence of modern conveniences and poor sanitation. No claimant, however, for February, 193 3 13 "WHO WAS HE BEFORE HE MARRIED MADAME DUFERNE?" recognition as this discoverer has ever pre sented himself. The name "the Art Colony" which still survives, was soon used to designate these buildings which filled up with painters, writ ers, musicians and others who must be dis missed only with stating that they lived their art instead of contenting themselves with a more objective expression. .At first there were com' mercial artists. Whether they left because they had prospered or for other reasons is not known. Anyway, they left, one by one. And the Colony was soon flooded with young people advancing under the new slogan, "Vart pour Van." That was during the first decade of this century. Lou Wall Moore, Charles Francis Brown and Thomas Wood Stevens took studios, and from that time the renting agents' lists of Colony residents have included the names of young people who have since become widely known. Apparently it has been a forcing bed of talent. When several gather and be come reminiscent about the old days the names mentioned are like a roster of American writers and painters: Ben Hecht, Maxwell ("Bogie") Bodenheim, Harry Hansen, Witter Bynner, Maurice Browne and Ellen van Volk- enburg, Sherwood Anderson, Theodore Dreiser, Floyd Dell, George Cram Cook, the pre-Little Review Margaret Anderson, Vachel Lindsay, Charles T. Hallinan, Edgar Lee Masters, Edna Kenton, George Burman Fos ter, Harriet Monroe, Belle Silviera, Stanislaus Szukalski, Wanda Stopa, Eunice Tietjens, Alfred Kreymborg, Llewellyn Jones, Susan Wilbur, Vincent Starrett, Clara Laughlin, John Cowper Powys, Henry B. Fuller; and, because the Colony has always been a magnet for people at the University, Robert Morss Lovett, Robert Herrick, Thorstein Veblen. At the present time there are two art schools — Huettel's and Kelly's — and writers and artists, as before. Within the last few years a number of people who formerly would have taken studios there have gone around the corner to the steam-heated hospitality of a large apartment building at 5644 Harper Ave nue; it's rather an annex to the Colony. There are Francis Strain, Fred Biesel, Emil Armin, J. Z. Jacobsen, Marion Neville, John Drury, Jun Fujita. Will the Colony survive the coming Fair? Well, we don't know. Probably the Colony will not pay much attention to the coming Fair, and vice versa. Taboo /^\NE or another of the several with-gun- and-camera-through-Africa explorers, we can't for the life of us remember which one, came back from the dark continent to this his native land with a good many thousands of feet of film. He'd been there with his movie camera and sound equipment for two years or so studying the various habits (and lack of habits) and customs of the tribes of the interior. He was pretty sure he had a lot of the real stuff that might be of financial interest to the movie people. He called upon the director of the Educa tional Department of one of the big screen companies and asked him if he were in the market for some particularly fine ethnological pictures. "No," the director replied, "we don't go in for religious stuff." Modern Zoo TT was about a decade ago when ground was first broken for what has turned out to be the world's most modern zoo. This project has been under construction, with scant public notice, all these years in a secluded spot in the Forest Preserve near Brookfield. And after an expenditure of several millions of dollars, the new zoo will be able to make its official bow to the visiting world during the Century of Progress; in fact many of the buildings are ready now for the occupancy of their animal tenants. The Brookfield Zoo will be the last word in wild animal housing. Before ground was broken a party of interested Chicagoans went abroad, at their own expense, to pick up pointers from European zoological gardens. They visited the famous Tierpark of the Hagenbecks at Stellingen, Hamburg, the Lon don Gardens, the Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Berlin, Frankfort and Munich collections and the New York Zoo in their study of construc tion. It was the barless type of the Tierpark that they took for their model. And so the Brookfield Zoo will be, to a great extent, barless. Moats and water bar riers will be the only obstructions between the public and most of the animals. The work is being brought to completion by Director E. H. Bean and his son Robert, both widely experienced in wild animal care. Di rector Bean was with the Lincoln Park Zoo at one time and later, for twenty years, in charge of the Washington Park Zoo in Milwaukee. His son, after study at the University of Wis consin and field work in Australia, gave up the directorship of the San Diego Zoo to be come associated with him at Brookfield. No small part of the Director's task in the assembling of the inmates of the new zoo is the elimination of freak animals for those that are more familiar to the public. There are something like five hundred thousand different members of the animal and insect kingdoms, and the idea is to inhabit the zoo with the more common animals. We don't know why. Maybe the zoo people think extremely rare animals wouldn't be happy there. Anyway, it's the world's most modern zoo and it's right here in our own backyard. Save Radio E have just learned that there's a way to preserve Radio's finer contributions to Art, and to obtain phonograph records of music that is not now available on commercial records. For years, the Universal Radio Pro duction people in the Tower Building have been recording radio programs right "off-the- air" for leading advertisers and broadcasters. The records are very inexpensive and give a remarkably faithful reproduction of what has been broadcast. Recently, one of the Town's most ardent music lovers, Arthur M. Barnhart, discovered this means of getting musical records which are not catalogued. Mr. Barnhart lost no time in building up his already extensive record library by commissioning the Universal outfit to record from the radio such choice musical fare as the entire Metropolitan Opera broad casts of Gotterdamerung, Lohengrin, and the Rheingold. In time Mr. Barnhart hopes to possess the world's greatest library of recorded Wagneriana. Dead Letters /^\F course you've heard of dead letters, and ^^^ possibly you, too, have wondered just what in the devil happens to them after they've become officially dead. We learned a bit about them recently. Most people put return addresses on their letters, but occasionally nearly everyone slips up, and people move, though it does grieve the Post Office department. And that's how dead letters are born. If a letter is not deliverable and has no return address, it is consigned to the Dead Letter Office, the local branch of which is at 13th and Indiana. There the Post Office has special sleuths whose business it is to track down the senders of the defunct mail. They open letters and hunt around for a name and address. If they are successful in finding a clue, the letters are returned to the sender? 14 The Chicagoan and postage is collected. If only a name is found, then the originating Post Office is determined from the postmark, and the letter is sent to the name at the Post Office. If the letter is signed only "Mabel" or "Fred" and there is no clue whatsoever to the identity of the writer, the letter is, of course, destroyed. They just can't have a bunch of letters like that around; they'd pile up so. A great deal of third class matter is destroyed anyway. The Post Office doesn't return this type of mail, circulars and such things, unless the sender pledges to pay return postage. Many thousands of undeliverable third class mail are received daily in the Chicago Post Office and most of it is promptly destroyed, because return postage is not guaranteed. Some of them are form let ters which keep coming in year after year to addresses which are obsolete, but since the sender never gets them back, he never knows the difference. So, if you want your undeliverable mail re turned to you, it would be a good idea to put your return address on the first class matter and on all other classes promise return postage as well. Coffee And \ FEW years ago the B. &? K. houses used ¦*•*- to serve tea during their afternoon per formances. Patrons could have a cup of tea and a couple of wafers while waiting for seats. We don't remember how popular B. & K. teas were, nor how long the service lasted, because, not never having been an advertising solicitor, we've never gone to picture shows during afternoons. And now the Haymarket has revived the idea, with variations. The Haymarket Theatre, out on Madison and Halsted Streets, was for years one of the Town's foremost burlesque houses, even though the Haymarket Riot, famous in song and story, did not take place there. Recently the Haymarket dropped burley and went in for straight pictures. It's open all day and all night. The admission prices are 10c days, 1 5c nights. And, day or night, the management serves a cup of coffee and a doughnut to everyone paying the admission price. National Amateur HHHE boys and girls who swing the Official * Ping-Pong Rackets against the Official Ping-Pong Balls will be at it again on March 10, 11, 12 in the Grand Ballroom of the Palmer House when the National Amateur Ping-Pong Championship of the United States takes place. The Parker Cup will again be contested for in the men's singles. It's the per petual trophy of ping-pong supremacy in this our (at long last) ping-pong conscious coun try, donated by Mr. George Swinnerton Parker. Players are coming from all over the coun try to enter the tournament. To a great extent only state or large-city champions will k- allowed to play. Coleman Clark, a local l>oy, is the present National Champion, and he'll be defending his title. From New York ,omes W. Chester Wells, 3rd National rank ing player. Herbert Allen, former champion of Leipzig and of the state of Saxony, is com ing, too; he'll pair up with Clark in the doubles. Helen Ovendon, present Illinois champion and Florence Bassler, present Chi cago District title-holder, Florence Hunter, and Mrs. Reginald Hammond are other top- notch local players who'll be entered. The Grand Ballroom of the Palmer House where such satisfactory facilities were pro vided for the playing of the Western Cham pionship will be the scene of this year's National. The honorary referees will be Avery Brundage, president of the Amateur Athletic Union, Charles S. Garland, former captain of the U. S. Davis Cup Tennis Team, Harry S. Knox, president of the American Lawn Tennis Association and Amos Alonzo Stagg, head football coach of the College of the Pacific. Little Theatre ANOTHER little theatre group has popped £*¦ up, though not, we understand, over night — The International House Theatre League. The players are good and the idea behind it all is good. They want to produce the better international plays in English; plays that have not been done in Chicago, and some that have never been done anywhere. Camille is the first production, and Marion Read, of When Chicago Was Young, heads the cast. It will be presented at International House February 24 and 25. If this offering goes over, the group will be able to carry on with the international plays idea. Most of them are professionals, and they're not in any way connected with the University of Chicago Dramatic Association; a few of them live at International House. 'Take A Look" '""pHE Mirror tappers arc practically ready *- to toe the line again. The curtain goes up March 3 and 4 at Mandel Hall. Mirror, if you didn't know it before, is the University of Chicago women's dramatic group that puts on an annual revue . It's not so old an organ ization as the University's Blackfriars, nor so well established, but we understand it's coming along nicely. In this year's show there is a hint of the smart modernity of Maude Phelps Hutchins' work (The Chicagoan, January, 1933), the customary verve and elan of Frank Hurburt O'Hara's direction, a ballet chorus with the touch that Bertha Ochsner made distinctive last year, and a briskness and snap about the tap routines eloquent of Edith Ballwebber. Nor will the men be forgotten; the audience will once more find the revue boasting actors— sort of a courtesy-of-Blackfriars arrangement. Any way, it looks as though this year's Mirror will be more polished and sparkling than ever before. Opera f^ RACE DENTON, who specializes in fill- ^^ ing up houses for worthy benefits, re ports a tremendous advance interest in the two performances of Tosca, scheduled for February 22 and 24 at ye grand old Auditorium. The temperamental Viennese soprano Maria Jeritza, who has been little more than a name and a good voice on phonograph records to Chicagoans, will appear here in opera for the first time. The robust John Charles Thomas is scheduled as Scarpia and Mario Duca, pro tege of Giorgio Polacco will tenor for the occasion. Isaac Van Grove will direct the old Civic Opera Orchestra in the pit. zArmy Relief A COMPARATIVELY little known organ- ¦*¦-*¦ ization, probably because it isn't forever running around making drives and tagging people, is the Army Relief Society. It cares for needy widows and orphans of officers and enlisted men of the regular army, with the result that such persons, whose normal lives keep them moving from place to place in this country and its possessions, may never become public charges in any locality. For the benefit of the Society's treasury, Major General and Mrs. Frank Parker and other officers and ladies of the regular army in and around Chicago are planning a dance and card party for the evening of Washing ton's Birthday. The affair will take place in the Army and Navy Club in the Lake Shore Athletic Club building. The invitations issued for the evening have met with a wide, generous response, and numbers of persons prominent in the National Guard, Organized Reserve and the social life of the Town gen erally are assisting in preparations. boo! EBRUARY. 1933 15 VIKINGS TWAIN Sculptor Os\ar J. W. Hansen is posed by Mr. Paul Stone beside his recently completed head of Leif Eri\sen for the lofty memorial that will stand at the southern extremity of Grant Par\, a permanent reminder of the great T^orsc man's contribution to the glory that is America. The Chicagoan When Checagou Was Young A Historical Century of Progress With a nudge at Alice Gerstenberg and Hernia Clark By Louis E. Laflin, Jr. CHARACTERS Indian Chief of the Illini Marquette Joliet LaSalle Cadillac Spirit of Fort Dearborn Captain "Long- John" Streator Miss Young Mr. Poor Mr. Pullman Mr. Crerar Mr. Drake Mr. Potter Fugitive Slave Mr. Field Mrs. Blair Mr. Rockefeller Mr. Swift Mrs. Palmer Queen Marie of Roumania Mr. Insull Scene! The action of the play takes place on the banks of the Chicago River in 1492, at The Tremont House in 1837, at the World's Fire in 1893 and on the roof of the Board of Trade in 1933. (As the following characters are introduced, the orchestra gives an effect of increased sound, for each one, of laughing saxophones as in a certain Fire Chief radio program. Enter Indian Chief.) Indian Chief: Me heep big Indian Chief of the Illini. (Laughing saxophone. Enter Marquette.) Marquette: I am Marquette, ze French explorer. (Increased effect.) Indian Chief: White man come, ugh! (Enter Joliet.) Joliet : I am Joliet, ze French Explorer. Marquette: Some day a great peniten tiary will be named in your honor. Joliet : Mr. Livingston, I presume. (They sha\e hands. Enter LaSalle.) LaSalle: I am LaSalle, ze great French Explorer. (Orchestral effect.) Joliet : Some day a famous automobile will be named for you. LaSalle : Why not? (Enter Cadillac.) Cadillac: I am Cadillac, ze great French Explorer. (Orchestral effect.) LaSalle : You, too, will become famous in the automobile industry. (Orchestral effect with bell and siren. En ter Spirit of Fort Dearborn.) Spirit: I am the Spirit of Fort Dearborn ¦ — the spirit of massacre. Because you French men have discovered this place, I foresee that a great city will rise here on the banks of this river — the Chicago River. And because you are four to one against this Indian, I foresee that the red man will be exterminated. Indian Chief: Ugh! Spirit.- It don't smell so good here. Indian Chief: What do you expect in a skunk cabbage patch? Spirit : I foresee that great stock yards will rise here to carry on the traditions of this place. So what shall we name this city now that we have founded it? All (Singing): "Chi-cago, Chi-cago, that toddlin' town." (Snap fingers. Jazz steps, etc. Blac\ out. The lights come on at once in time to catch the six characters running from the stage, and Miss Young entering carrying a chair, a quill pen and paper. She sits down on the chair, down left, facing left. Also enter Mr. Pull man and Mr. Crerar, each carrying chairs, which they place in the center of the stage facing each other. Mr. Dra\e carries in a flat piece of scenery, painted li\e a hotel des\, which he sets up diagonally in the upper right corner, getting behind it, li\e a hotel cler\. Miss Young puts her piece of paper down on a des\, which Marquette and Joliet carry in and place before her, and begins to write with her quill pen, at the same time reciting her letter aloud.) Miss Young: "The Tremont House, Chicago, July 4th, 1837. Dearest Mother, At last the beautiful City of Chicago, where I have lived SINCE CHICAGO WAS YOUNG, has become incorporated and now bids fair to become a very big city like Paris, France, and London, England. Your devoted daughter." Mr. Pullman: Well, Mr. Crerar, now that Chicago has four hundred and twenty- seven horse cars, what do you think of the future of Libraries here, Mr. Crerar? Mr. Crerar: Well, Mr. Pullman, I fore see that many great libraries will arise in Chicago and even a great University to be called the University of Chicago. Mr. Pullman: A goodly name, Mr. Crerar. Chicago has forty-seven bath-tubs. Mr. Crerar : Yes, Mr. Pullman, and what do you think of the future of the sleeping car? Mr. Pullman: Well, Mr. Crerar, I am glad that you asked me that question. I f ore- see that some day all railroads will have sleep ing cars. Already passengers are beginning to fall asleep on trains and train men arc be ginning to fall asleep at the switch. Mr. Crerar: That is very interesting, Mr. Pullman, but what is the name of that young hotel clerk who stands there behind the desk of the Tremont House in Chicago on July 4, 1837? Mr. Pullman: Do you not know, Mr. Crerar? That is Mr. Drake. MR. Crerar: And who is Mr. Drake, Mr. Pullman? Mr. Pullman: He is just a struggling young hotel clerk, who may some day own a big hotel in Chicago, a city containing fifty- three grocery stores. MR. Drake: I am glad to hear you gen tlemen mention my name, because I some day hope to be a hotel proprietor myself and to give a famous Game Dinner, ending up with squirrels stewed in champagne. Mr. Pullman: Are you game? Mr. Drake: Yes, and President Lincoln, the great Emancipator has a room in the hotel. He just registered before the curtain went up on this scene and may come down at any minute. Miss Young: (Rising.) What, President Lincoln here? The man who intends to abolish slavery, even if wc must fight a Civil War to do so? (Enter a Fugitive Slave Girl, with a red bandanna around her head.) Fugitive Slave: Laws-a-massy — I'se a Fugitive Slave from a Georgia chain gang, who came up by the grapevine route. (To Miss Young.) Save me, save me, little Missy, or the blood hounds catchee me. Miss Young: Yes, I shall save you, you poor creature. Get under this desk and wc will pretend it is a piano. (Fugitive Slave hides under des\.) Mr. Pullman: Come, Mr. Crerar, let us Jm-.BKUARY, 1933 17 help hide this unfortunate woman from her pursuers. (Mr. Pullman and Mr. Crerar stand on either side of Miss Young, to hide the Slave. Enter Mr. Potter.) Mr. Drake: Are you looking for an escaped Fugitive Slave? Mr. Potter: No, I am Mr. Potter. All: Oh. Mr. Crerar: Come, Mr. Potter, gather around this pretended piano and help us hide the Slave. (Enter Mr. Field, as Mr. Potter joins the group at the des\.) Mr. Drake: Are you looking for a Fugi tive Slave who has escaped? Mr. Field: No, I am Mr. Field. Chicago publishes two newspapers, but has no fire- engines. Mr. Pullman: Do you see that young man registering there at the hotel desk? Mr. Crerar: Yes, distinctly. What of it? Mr. Pullman : That is Mr. Field. Mr. Crerar: What Mr. Field? Mr. Pullman: The Mr. Field. Mr. Crerar ; What Mr. Field is that? Mr. Pullman: Mr. Marshall Field. Mr. Crerar: Not the Mr. Marshall Field? Mr. Pullman: Yes. Mr. Crerar: Who's he? — -I never heard of him . Mr. Field: I cannot help but overhear your conversation, gentlemen and I am glad to hear you ask who I am. I am an ambitious young man, who hopes to start a large depart - ment^store, WHEN CHICAGO IS YOUNG. Miss Young: Give him a room and bath! But first come here, Mr. Field, and help us hide a poor Fugitive Slave. (Mr. Field joins the group at the piano. Enter Captain Streator, who is very tall.) Captain Streator: I am Captain Long- John Streator, proprietor of the Kinzie House. I claim all of Chicago by the right of squatter sovereignty, because I am the first mayor of the city. I am also looking for a Fugitive Slave with bloodhounds, which are tied out side. (All, except Captain ' Streator and Mr. Dra\e, sing as Miss Young pretends to play the piano on the desk,. Enter Mr. Poor.) All: "O where, O where, has my little dog gone?" Mr. Poor: Mr. Abraham Lincoln is just leaving the hotel by a side door. All: Where! (All rush out except Miss Young and Mr. Poor.) Miss Young: How do you do, Mr. Poor? You are a fictitious character, are you not? Mr. Poor: Yes, Miss Young, and so are you. We could not have a love scene other wise. Think how awful if the ancestors of some of our first families were shown in the grip of love? Miss Young : I have just invented a motto for Chicago. It is "I Will." Mr. Poor: That is all very well, but now it is 1893 and the World's Fire is burning Chicago down, to the ground. (All the lights become red and all the characters who have so far appeared, come in, bent over and huddled, and mill about the stage saying, "Chicago is burning down" — "Everything is burning up," etc. All go out carrying the furniture they have brought in at the beginning of the scene. Lights go bac\ to amber again. Enter Mrs. Palmer, Mrs. Blair and Miss Young.) Mrs. Palmer: You are doing such splen did relief work, Mrs. Blair for the refugees of the Chicago Fire. Mrs. Blair : So are you, Mrs. Palmer. Mrs. Palmer: Thank you, Mrs. Blair and I hope soon that Chicago will be rebuilt. Mrs. Blair : Yes, Mrs. Palmer, when you can entertain Queen Marie of Roumania. I wear bloomers because I stand for woman's rights. Miss Young: You two dears go down stairs and attend to the soup kitchen and I will sort clothes here alone in Captain Streator's bedroom. (Mrs. Palmer and Mrs. Blair leave. Enter Mr. Potter.) Mr. Potter: Miss Young, do you not re call me? I am Mr. Potter. Will you not marry me? I helped you hide that Fugitive Slave before the Civil War. Miss Young : This is so sudden. No, Mr. Potter, I think I'll not marry you. Mr. Potter : That's all I wanted to know. (He goes out. Enter Mr. Field.) Mr. Field: Will you marry me, Miss Young? Miss Young: You take my breath away, but no, I guess I will not marry you. Mr. Field: Goodbye. (He goes out. Enter Mr. Poor.) Mr. Poor: How do you do, Miss Young. Our house was burned down and everything in it. It will be a long time before I can make enough money to ask you to marry me. Miss Young: Why, Mr. Poor. This is so sudden. Mr. Poor: It will not be sudden when I have made enough money. Miss Young: Then I may count on hear ing from you later? Mr. Poor: Yes, till then, goodbye. (He goes out. Enter Captain Streator.) Captain Streator: Ah, Miss Young. I am the mayor of Chicago and very rich. Chicago at last has a fire department. MlSS YOUNG: This is so sudden. A girl who lets a man propose without intending to accept him is no lady. Captain Streator: I'm afraid I don't get the connection. Miss Young: A girl who permits men to propose, just to satisfy her vanity, is no sport. Captain Streator: Miss Young, I am only a poor blunt old bachelor, but I love you? Will you marry me? Miss Young: But I am only an innocent young girl. I do not know what you mean. Captain Streator: You mean everything to me. Miss Young: Long- John! (They embrace. — Blac\ out, while they leave the stage. The lights come on as the following characters come in: Mr. Dra\e, Mr. Potter, Miss Young, Mr. Poor, Mr. Pull man, Mr. Crerar, Mr. Field, Mr. Rockefeller, Mr. Swift and Mrs. Blair.) Mrs. Blair : I am glad you are all here at Mrs. Palmer's reception for Queen Marie of Roumania. Mr. Rockefeller: I see you're here, Mr. Swift. Mr. Swift: Yes, Mr. Rockefeller. You and I have built a great University on the ashes of what was once the World's Fire of 1893. Mr. Rockefeller: Yes, Mr. Swift. A great Methodist University. Mr. Swift: But tell me, Mr. Rockefeller, who are all the guests here tonight at Mrs. Potter Palmer's ball for Queen Marie of Roumania? Mr. Rockefeller: I am glad you asked me, Mr. Swift, for some day I shall build a great Radio Center in New York. I hap pened to see the list of this evening's guests in this morning's Tribune and so I memorized it. They are as follows: Mr. Potter, Mr. Palmer, Mrs. Potter and Mrs. Palmer. Mr. Potter Palmer and Mrs. Potter Palmer and Mr. and Mrs. Potter Palmer and Mr. Palmer Potter. Mrs. Blair : Hush, you all, for here comes Mrs. Potter Palmer herself, our hostess. She has at last decided to come to her own party and she is bringing with her Queen Marie of Roumania! (Enter Mrs. Palmer and Queen Marie of Roumania.) All: Oh, look, there's Mrs. Potter Palmer and Queen Marie of Roumania! Queen Marie: I am glad to be here to night in your so great City of Chicago, which was incorporated in 1837. This is indeed a formal occasion, Mrs. Potter Palmer. Mrs. Potter Palmer: (Fanning Queen Marie with a large ostrich feather fan.) You said a mouthful, Queen. So let us go to Mr. Drake's Game Dinner. (They all go out, two by two. Enter Miss Young, now Mrs. Streator. Enter from the opposite side Mr. Poor.) Mr. Poor: So you did not wait for me. Miss Young? Miss Young: No, I married Captain Streator, the wealthy and successful Mayor of Chicago. I am now the bored wife of an idle rich man, a club man and society man. Mr. Poor: I might have given you love. Mrs. Streator. Mrs. Streator: Yes, but now alas, it is too late. (Enter Captain Streator.) Captain Streator: Come dear, we must go and get some champagne stewed in squirrels. Mrs. Streator: Yes, Captain. Goodbye. Mr. Poor. There will always be a wistful place in my heart for you. (Blac\ out- They leave the stage. The lights come on. Enter Mr. Insull.) Mr. Insull: I am Mr. Insull and I made a great Opera House rise on the ashes of the Chicago Fire, but now they go back to the Auditorium instead and the city is all aban doned and deserted. The latest World's Fair alone is solvent, for this 1933. Here I stand on the roof of the deserted Board of Trade. (Enter Mrs. Streator, with white hair.) Mrs. Streator: Hello! Mr. Insull: How did you ever get up here on the roof? Mrs. Streator: I am looking for aero planes. Everyone today is bored and sing- torch songs. We all travel so fast these day? The city is now an abandoned ruin, but it \va-« nice to be here — Both: WHEN CHICAGO WA5 YOUNG! (The Curtain falls with a crash. Above ;' is written: "You yourselves must set fire U" the faggots which you have brought.") 18 The Chicagoan The Big Parade Now Forming to March Fo'th to See the Late Engineer Limp In By Richard Atwater ("Rio/') JOHN W. GARNER WITH AN ALARM CLOCK TECHNOCRATS, ON TRACTORS WITH BANNER MADE IN THAT ONE-MAN RAYON MILL READING "THERE ARE STILL GOOD SEATS IN THE CALORIES" FOLLOWED BY MECHANICAL CALLIOPE PLAYING "OLD MAN RIVET" THIRTEEN MILLION UNEMPLOYED IN ALPHABETICAL FILES WITH AN EXPECTANT SPACE LEFT IN THE FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND H'S WITH THE LATE ENGINEER AT THE THROTTLE DUE TO ARRIVE FINALLY ON MARCH 4 ALTHOUGH SNOWBOUND, AVALANCHED AND WASHED-OUT WITH BRIDGES FALLING UNDER AND ON HIM HAVING HIT ONE FREIGHT TRAIN AFTER ANOTHER HEAD ON AFTER BEING SIDESWIPED AND DERAILED HIS BOILERS BUSTED THE STEAM RUN DOWN WITH THE GREATEST FIREMAN SINCE ALEXANDER HAMILTON JUMPED OUT TO GO TO ENGLAND BUT WHOSE BATTERED TRAIN NEVERTHELESS WILL NOW ARRIVE ON TRACK THIRTEEN A HOT BOX AT EVERY AXLE SIGN, READING "HA HA, I AM REALLY THE FIRST LADY OF THE LAND, DON'T YOU THINK SO?" CARRIED BY GRACIE ALLEN DELEGATION OF BAREFOOT INVESTORS PUSHING THEIR CATS AND DOGS INDOMITABLE ANTI-SALOON LEAGUERS WITH BANNERS HAILING HOOVER AS THE HOLLAND BOY WHO MAY HAVE GOT IN DUTCH BUT PUT HIS THUMB IN THE DIKE AND STOPPED THE TRICKLE OF BEER, ANYWAY REGARDLESS OF THE DELUGE OF DEPRESSION THAT SWEPT HIM AWAY CHARLEY CURTIS IN CEREMONIAL INDIAN HEADDRESS LOOKING FOR A GOOD CIGAR STORE "BARON MUNCHAUSEN" GETTING READY TO SAY "WAS YOU THERE, CHARLEY?" THE MAN WHO BROKE THE BANK AT MONTE CARLO APOLOGIZING ON HANDS AND KNEES FOR BEING A PIKER DELEGATION OF CHICAGO LADIES ABOUT TO ASK MR. H. C. HOOVER TO GIVE ONE DOLLAR FOR THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC FORMER HIGH PRESSURE SALESMEN- WEARING BEDROOM SLIPPERS AND CARRYING COPIES OF "BALLYHOO" TO READ DURING HERBERT'S FAREWELL ADDRESS FIRE ENGINE CORPS PILOTED BY ALFRED E. SMITH WITH CIGAR, BLOWING RINGS EDDIE CANTOR, CARRYING A MIRROR AND INSISTING THAT HE WANTS CANTOR SHADE OF MARK HANNA LOOKING A LITTLE PALE A PEANUT VENDOR CRYING "WHAT NO ELEPHANTS?" GRACIE ALLEN'S BROTHER DOLLY GANN S HUSBAND INSISTING HE IS NOT GRACIE ALLEN'S BROTHER FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT ANXIOUSLY SUPPORTING A TRACK-END BUMPER DESIGNED TO STOP THE TRAIN PLATOON OF RECEIVERS AND ATTORNEYS IN SILK HATS WITH FLORAL OFFERINGS MR. H. L. MENCKEN LEERING AT THE FRENCH AMBASSADOR TUMULTUOUS CROWDS OF RUGGED INDIVIDUALISTS ON A ROMAN HOLIDAY VISITING JAPANESE LAUGHING UP THEIR SLEEVES THE MAN WHO IMPERSONATES HOOVER S VOICE IN THE "MARCH OF TIME" BROADCASTS LOOKING A BIT WORRIED UNCLE SAM ABOUT TO PUSH THE TRAINSHED GATES AJAR AS THE LONG AWAITED TRAIN PUFFS AT LAST INTO THE DEPOT OF HISTORY WALL STREET BRASS BAND (ON FOOT) PLAYING "OVERTURE — 1928-1932" (A) "I DREAMT I DWELT IN MARBLE HALLS" (B) "BROTHER, CAN YOU SPARE A DIME?" WALTER WINCHELL ON ALL FOURS, IN A LOUD WHISPER ANNOUNCING "BLESSED EVENT" TO HAPPEN IN WHITE HOUSE ON MARCH 4 MARCHING LEGIONNAIRES SALUTING THE RETIRING AUGUSTUS LADY FROM EASY ACES INSISTING THAT 'GUS THE BUST" IS THE WAY SHE PRONOUNCES IT JOHN P. WINTERGREEN AND ALEXANDER THROTTLEBOTTOM, BOWING ON TWO WHITE HORSES RIDDEN BACKWARDS CITIZENS OF HAMLIN TOWN HAILING HERBERT" AS THE PIED PIPER WHO FOUND TWO MILLION RATS, WHISTLED ON HIS PIPE— AND FOUND THIRTEEN MILLION NEW RATS COMING TO JOIN THE FIRST TWO MILLION FLOAT, DEPICTING MICKEY MOUSE CHASING KATE SMITH UP THAT MOUNTAIN THE I-VOTED-FOR-AL-IN-1928 CLUB MARCHING TO PRESENT HERBERT WITH THE OFFICIAL BLUE-RIBBONED BROWN DERBY OF THE CENTURY FLOYD GIBBONS BROADCASTING THE EVENT INTO A LAPEL MICROPHONE WHICH IS LUCKILY DISCONNECTED DECORATED FLOAT REPRESENTING A LOAD OF HAY ON WHICH REPOSE GIANT EGGS LABELLED "WICKERSHAM COMMISSION" "MORITORIUM" AND "A CHICKEN IN EVERY POT" BERNARR MCFADDEN EXPECTANTLY HOLDING A HANDFUL OF BABIES — JUST BABIES CREW OF THE SHIP OF STATE WITH PLACARDS HAILING THE MODERN CASABIANCA WHO STOOD ON THE BURNING DECK WHILE HE SAID (A) THE SHIP IS NOT ON FIRE (Continued on page 64) Flbruary, 193 3 19 "Castell" Portraits | % 0^ Wm ~:mmm \ n GIL BERRY. r : MRS. HORACE HOLMES, JR. s / \ # I H. BRINTON MCDERMOTT. The Chicagoan The portraits on these pages are reproductions of "Castell" drawings in brown tones by Mr. Calvin Smith from personality photographs by Mr. Paul Stone. The young ladies and gentle men are active participants in the social life of the universities. ^ \l ESPEY WILLIAMSON. LES SWANLAND. February, 1933 Paris Rebound The Unraveling of an International Complication By Texas Guinan PARIS is the odor de cologne and fancy smelling salts of the American. It's the one country that has no speed limits. Even the modernistic maiden can do two miles on nothing — flat. The clocks are set six hours ahead of New York's time. Here's accelera tion for anyone. In New York, one can see Liberty; but in Paris one can know the joy of feeling it. In 1492 Columbus discovered America; but in 1931 France failed to discover me. My mission was quite misunderstood. The French believed that I had come over to their country with the sole purpose of stepping on the nation's toes — and loitering there. So, in accord ance, they extended me a royal hand out of the country. Not many weeks ago I returned to Paris; and my entree was furnished by none other than the Tribunal Minister of France. The Paris that I have just visited was quite changed from the one in which I was a war-time traveller and entertainer. This time smiles endorsed every individual's face. Life seemed a thing of gaiety and freedom. The roar and strife of guns have passed and the battle of living is the only thing on hand now. I LOVED to watch the little dimpled blonde at the Cafe Grand Escart, who, after her seventh cocktail, decided to start drinking, and the grinning Martiniques (the French Harlem-ites) in green and red paper crowns, false beards, and dinner jackets "swanking and kinging it" for the night. Living is a revival meeting for "suckers" ... La Fetiche in Monmarte . . . the rendezvous for the high-collared ladies. What a cavalcade of human souls! There, in one corner, is the down-and-outer telling the crowd how he had once broken the bank at Monte Carlo; and, here, in another seques tered place, is a party of collegians whooping it up, all of which goes to prove that the real college cheer is the check from home. At the Dome in Montparnasse, the real American spot, the gigolos hunting customers, and finding very little difficulty with the Amer ican seekers. Their nails are polished to match their shoes, but their wits are dull. And, the snow-birds (disguised as Turkish rug ped dlers) are on hand for the tourists, promising the land of plenty or all of Europe for one sniff of the powder which they to sell. Maxim's, the place where the married gentleman meets his amour. Here man proves most conclusively that he is built with a heart and a changeable mind, or no mind and a changeable heart. Strike up the band, Mr. Fiddler, and play me that tune, Bon Soir, Madame La Lune. Petit Chaumiere is always filled with curio seekers who watch the lady-like youths display their highly colored sport shirts whilst they sing or pose with their hands fastened most securely to their hips . . . "our loveliest girls are men," the advertisements say. If living is getting cheaper in the blase places, then so is life. The Rue de Lape is the much heralded red-light district of gay Paree. Here the pug-uglies dance with one another. The spirit of the dance has infected them, and heaven to them has something to do with rhythm. Dance, dance, dance . . . and why not? . . . your soul is a musical instrument, and anyone can make a symphony out of a noisy jazz band if he is guided by that which is from within. The Red-Hot mamas in the Rue Blondelle meet the spectator with a smile and make him pay for a leer . . . the al fresco diners in the Place de Terte . . . the markets at dawning . . . the onion soup at L'Escargot . . . the side cars at the Ritz, where Americans dedicate drinking to the National Indoor Sports League ... the Bois at the fall of twilight . . . Vespers in Notre Dame . . . the high mass in the little Millet church at Barbizon . . . the beauty of the fountains at Versailles highly decorated by the colored lights playing upon them . . . and the Palace, itself, which serves as a reminder that liquor has ruined men, but women have destroyed dynasties . . . Marie Antoinette, Du Barry, Pompadour. Gloria Swanson and her not too newly wedded husband, Michael Farmer, are now frequent rounders of night life in Paris. I have seen Gloria publicly sigh as if civilization was billing and cooing in the cradle at Les Ambassadeurs Cafe. Gloria Vanderbilt presided at an open salon party which was given to me at the Boeuf Sur Le Toit (Beef on the Ceiling to you) . What charm and grace! She was carrying, and rightfully, one of the great est names in America's social calendar, and she seemed as unaffected as the one who served her. She might have been little Miss Muffet at the party save for the fact that a great school of tradition and character seemed to shower a beam about her. Erskine Gwynne is the writer and inter viewer of all these in Paris, and he and Jay Gould have a knack of always finding something to be light and joyous about. Mr. and Mrs. Cole Porter (Cole has written more smart music for American musical productions than any one author) are teaming it everywhere, a strange sight for the marriage-tied ones in Paris. Carlyle Blackwell, the lord and polished gentleman of the screen, is now a Paris-ite. He has almost forgotten his acting profession, or maybe it is because he does not hold his liquor too well. I must confess that I am perplexed. Pearl White was one of my genial hostesses in Paris. Her winter menage is a costly villa in Cairo and the summer-time finds her com fortably lodged in a forty-odd-room palace in Paris . . . just forty rooms, but it's home to Pearl. In the good old days, we lived in the same rooming house together. She was just as poor as I. We made the old, wild, western silent pictures together with "Hoot" Gibson, Tom Mix, and William S. Hart. Pearl used to straddle horses, and many are the times when she jumped from a horse to the top of a passing train, in the serial days. Now she just jumps from a Rolls Royce to a Packard. But Pearl's existence is the same as mine today, not unsimilar to the serial days — "continued next week." Rubye de Remier — do you remember her? She was acclaimed as having the most naive face of any girl in America. Now she is Mrs. Benjamin Troup. And like her name, she has become dignified and sophisticated. Tempora Mutantur! Don't they though? My Parisian visit came to an end with a luncheon with King Alphonso of Spain. He has found a refuge in a quaint chateau just on the outskirts of Fontainebleau. Such a like able fellow, with a smile as wide as Spain, and with a personality to put the average mime to shame. He speaks English lamentably. Wc exchanged excuses with the grammar of one another. I apologized for mine by explaining that I was reared on a ranch where English is just as much unbroken as the horses and the cattle. I told him hi? country throws the bull and mine gives it away. Among the topical things which we cussed and discussed were Fatty Arbuckle. Al Capone, and the Spanish Revolution. Fatty is the funniest man he has ever seen . . . and Al Capone, "Does he blow up cities like Chicago?" . . . and, "the Spanish people are like children. They must have a revolt now and then." Playful little things. And there isn't any more, save the fact that Paris is some thousands of miles away from me, across a mess of water of which one can only see the top. 22 The Chicagoan Dilatory Diary In the Painful Election- Inaugural Interlude By Courtney Borden BEING a diary I might have kept after reading Arnold Bennett's , Journals. Friday, December 2nd. En Route. All day and two nights on the train. Peaceful panorama, the South. While travelling across Commonwealth of Virginia shall hasten to finish More Merry Go Round. Necessary to read up on the Romans before reaching Rome. Poor Hurley! A good-looking secretary of war, no doubt, but will never be able to talk to him again (he can tell charming stories of Edna Ferber Cimarron variety) with out thinking of him and Mrs. Hurley practicing before mirror to see how they will look in grand march at White House receptions. Rotten stuff, this book. Seemingly Democratic propaganda. But mustn't say so when I get there. The Democrats are in. Better to follow those in power and copy Pat Harrison, who knew well the auspicious moment when to jump from dry to wet. Saturday, December 3d. Washington. Arrived. Washington beautiful, as usual. Must remember to forget I was Republican when here in October. Will be teased about leaving many dinners to sit in libraries and upstair sitting rooms in order to hear Hoover's speeches. Shall change subject quickly to when I did Democratic Convention for southern newspaper. Ambiguous. A few hunger marchers already on streets. Saw many of them in train yards of cities along way, bumming rides in freight cars. Next week will be exciting, what with demonstrations and Congress. Never have seen live Lame Ducks in action. At tea we hear much about army of marchers due tomorrow. Policemen already posted at ever corner of residential sections, even F. St. Washington nervous. Sunday, December 4th. Much political and diplomatic talk. Political being guesses on Roosevelt's cabinet. Some aspirers to 'big basket of political plums at Swedish Legation for lunch. We hear, confidentially, that France will pay. Much laughter over Hoover choosing December 15th as night for diplomatic reception. Claudel will lead the line. Unfor tunate Rianno, one time Spanish Ambassador and so long the popular dean of the Corps, now a man without a job. Social upheavals cer tainly hard on Ambassadors. Italy has just sent us a new one. Young Rosso. They say Mussolini has made rule against his bachelor Ambassadors marrying. He must know Washington widows. No one mentions Hoover, nor even Mills. The King is Dead. Long live the King. To learn fickleness of human nature live in Washington. Monday, December 5th. Congress convenes. Tremendous excitement. Galleries jammed. Society, politicians, diplomats, journalists, sight-seers lucky enough to get a pass from somewhere, all rubbing elbows in colorful assem blage anticipating fireworks. Can't hear a word. Only the press can hear. The vote is taken. What did he say? — We ask the man next us. Defeated! — Impossible. And only by handful of votes. I see La Guardia. Glad he was beaten. And De Priest. Living in the South for part of every winter makes it hard to believe negro congressman. I see Bob Bacon. Glad he triumphed over a Whitney. Garner looks like he has been bothered by moths. Perhaps he has. Plenty of them in the South. Dinner and bridge at an Embassy. Marvelous wines. Queried concerning Century of Progress Exposition. Foreigners interested. They have arranged expensive exhibits for their countries. Will it be a success? Yes, of course. Anything in Chicago will be a success. Ah, yes, they agree, but they must ask whether it will be safe for them to come out . The joke getting quite old. We do hope nothing serious will happen to important ambassadors from far away lands should they come. We need them to negotiate for more bonds which will be purchasable when upswing comes. Seated between Greek and Rumanian ministers. We hear first hand information concerning Madam Lupescu. Very illuminating. February, 1933 DAVID BKRNS A NEW PHOTOGRAPH OF COURTNEY BORDEN (MRS. JOHN borden) author of Adventures In A Man's Land to be PUBLISHED BY MACMILLAN COMPANY FEBRUARY 21. "Our best way to make the front page," says Davila with a laugh. And Simopoulos: "Do you know, personally, Mr. Insull?" We admit it and hasten to add we have grown up with his son and still think he is as grand a person as- we thought he was when pronounced the young man of 1930 by Chicago's Junior Chamber of Commerce. The gentleman from Athens smiles. Difficult to imagine just what he is thinking. Then he exclaims, "My poor little country has not seen such importance since antique days!" We all laugh. He is charming, this man with mustache, quiet eyes, generations of culture behind him. Superlative Cissie Patterson. "You envy me my job?" she answers incredulously. "You wouldn't if you could see me out on the street checking up on the news boys and why they don't sell more papers." While she spoke I thought of how angry she must have been with Drew Pearson. Shameful book! No one in Washington, so far, has mentioned it. Trust the scandal-loving public of small towns to eat it up. Home very late. Past the White House. Breathlessly beautiful, chaste, dignified. What did Bennett note in 1911: — "The White House very nice architecture. Rather small. Distinguished." Eng lish patronizing again. Best thing they do. However, I think Eng land and some Englishmen superb. Lights burning on both floors, still. Is Hoover reading? According (Continued on page 55) 23 THE MODERN MODE IN MOTORS A BUICK CONTRIBUTION TO 1933 — FIVE-PASSENGER COUPE WITH 138-INCH WHEELBASE. THE SMART AND BEAUTIFULLY STYLED OLDSMOBILE 1933 SIX-CYLINDER CONVERTIBLE COUPE. PIERCE-ARROW S SENSATIONAL SILVER ARROW WITH TWELVE CYLINDERS AND 175 HORSEPOWER. 24 The Chicagoan DISTINGUISHING THE SEASON THE NEW PACKARD SUPER EIGHT CLUB SEDAN POWERED BY A 145 HORSEPOWER ENGINE. THE 1933 LA SALLE V-8 FIVE-PASSENGER TOWN SEDAN OF TRIM, DEBONAIRE BODY LINES. ORCHESTRA LEADER FRANKIE MASTERS AND THE SILVER ANNIVERSARY HUPMOBILE SIX. February, 1933 25 Theatrical Potpourri Feverish Activity Everywhere but at the Box Office A NIGHTMARE month in the theatre! A dizzy, shifting, unreasoning succes- ¦ sion of attractions served up to the tilted proboscis of theatre-going Chicago! Failures, cut-prices, truncated runs, cancelled announcements, all the dismal indicia of an industry in chaos! Are the pathetically opti mistic producers of plays entirely to blame for this condition? I think not. Chicago, groggy under the lash of financial disasters, has lost its nerve, has become a city of indiscriminating bargain hunters. Scouts from England report that recently there were thirty legitimate shows on view in London. Rumor tells of Britishers, with shiny evening clothes and moth-eaten silk hats, packing the playhouses and rinsing their monetary woes in the cleans ing streams of laughter. What are we doing? Frankly, we are killing Chicago as an important amusement center, losing our heritage as one of the world's great theatre towns. We are becom ing like the avid shoppers who are lured by a price-tag of forty-nine cents while ignoring the same article at half-a-dollar. At this writing our one outstanding success is The Cat and the Fiddle, dying on its feet at a top of three dollars, and now doing great business at two dollars. If this international hit had been brought in originally at its present price, the canny Shuberts would have had to drop the tickets to one-fifty to convince amusement seekers that they were getting something for nothing. And The Cat and the Fiddle is worth three dollars. So was Face the Music (Grand) , which pre sumably could not operate for less money and consequently died. This failure points another problem for the producer over and above the general question of whether it is worth while to send shows to Chicago at all. I refer to the type of casts we can expect under present conditions. Of the persona! hits in Face the Music only Mary Boland boarded the Pullman for the West. Although Miss Boland, our leading exponent of salty and uncultured dow agers, gave breezy sweep to the show's broad satire of municipal corruption, most of the supporting roles were in uninspired hands. Concerning this all too common phenomenon, I guess all one can say is that if Chicago wants Broadway casts, Chicago must be prepared to pay for them. According to the good old Shubert custom Blossom Time with its perennial interpreters was rushed in to fill the void at the Grand left by the demise of Face the Music. If you do not now think that John Charles Gilbert, Gertrude Lang and George Hassell are good as Schubert, Mitzi and Kranz, you probably never will, because these worthies have been singing and acting said parts about one thousand times apiece. They are as smooth in their roles as bourbon which has idled for ten years in a charred keg. The big thrill in this year's company is a new Von Schober, one Allan Jones, a? likely a lad By William C. Boyden as ever sweetened a draughty theatre with tenor notes and made life difficult for prosaic husbands whose wives are partial to matinees. Other vagrant thoughts about Mr. Jones will be found under the picture on the opposite page. At last report this deathless operetta is doing its customary good business, and its principals and chorus are dusting off their more regal costumes for a much anticipated switch to The Student Prince. The material is certainly at hand for a gorgeous revival of the latter piece. And while this is going on, Show Boat, having failed to pack the Auditorium, is lend ing a hopeful hand to the problem of keeping Paramount out of receivership by making the rounds of the talkie palaces in an abbreviated version. Helen Morgan passed us by when Show Boat was out here a couple of years ago with all its big names; Winninger, Bledsoe, Marsh, Terris, Edna May Oliver, Puck and White. Now she is all that is left of a once proud cast. And how good she is as the wist ful octoroon! Her trembling nether lip and haunted eyes bring a dozen tears where one flowed for the pathos of Margaret Carlisle. The others are good substitutes. William Kent makes an excellent simulacrum of the more mellow Winninger in the famous Cap tain Andy role; Margret Adams and Paul Keast sing well as Magnolia and Ravenal and make love as though they mean it; Robert Raines rumbles effectively in his rendition of Old Man River. The weakest spot is Bertha Belmore who slides about in the shoes of Edna May Oliver. There is only one Edna May Oliver. Another attempt to bring the Black Belt to the Loop is filling the Garrick with the patter of soft-shoe dancing and the hoarse throbbing of blue singing. They call it Dixie on Parade. Moving with febrile speed, our dark brethren exhibit unbelievable pedal acceleration; rich, throaty voices; and any shade of sepia epider mis you may prefer. Like most negro shows, Dixie on Parade lacks proper balance and be comes repetitious before eleven o'clock rolls around. Also it sacrifices too much of the native stuff for spurious imitation of Cau casian revues. Yet of its kind this vaudeville melange has considerable entertainment value. Among the month's memories is the Guy Bates Post revival of The Play's the Thing, which failed to recall to play-goers that there is a theatre next to the Blackstone Hotel. That this Molnar comedy is good has been axiomatic since Holbrook Blinn made it a thing of delight with his crisp worldliness. The play is still good, but the cast was not of metropolitan quality. And Mr. Post acted the fat role of Sandor Turai with all the crispness of a cafeteria doughnut. A more titilating reminiscence is the brief visit of that charming and cultured • lady, Cornelia Otis Skinner, who waxes in artistic stature as the hectic Thirties pass on their tortured way. Her Draperian character sketches attain a more finished and assured definition, while her ambition, which first found outlet in her Wives of Henry VIII, now comes into full flower with The Empress Eugenie. These six episodes in one of the most colorful lives of recent history give Miss Skinner a broad opportunity. The story runs from the first flush of youthful ambition through the grandeur of glory and the drama of defeat to the peace of resignation. These variations on the scale of life are deftly dif ferentiated and powerfully dramatized. Postponing until my closing paragraphs comment on the three productions of the Chicago Civic Operetta Company must not be laid to malice. Rather I put my dead-line ahead so that my vagrant thoughts might in clude consideration of the third and current effort, The Desert Song. Here is experiment which deserves support; a company of sea soned songbirds in the light opera field; a vast expanse of seats in the Civic Opera House and a dollar and a half asked for the best; all the scenery from scores of grand operas avail able for adaptation to the requirements of opera's more frivolous younger brothers; direc tion which has had its training in the success ful operetta experiment in Saint Louis. No better choice for the opening could have been made than Robm Hood, first produced here thirty-three years ago and composed by a scion of one of Chicago's first families. It was a delight. Greek Evans made instant inroad to our hearts by his virile singing of Brown October Ale; Charlotte Lansing endowed Maid Marian with sympathetic charm and a splendid voice: John Dunsmure rattled the acoustics of the house with his Armorers Song. It is true that the performance lasted until midnight on the opening, but the importunate audience was largely to blame. A week later The Song of the Flame. slightly unprepared, gave Mr. Evans and Miss Lansing additional laurels as they smashed over the rousing title song and the swinging You May Wander Away. Again interesting scenes were evolved from the opera ware houses; comedy was passably presented by Dunsmure and George Sweet; an openinc chorus of impressionistically waving arms was startling. Currently we have The Desert Song. Vn fortunately Miss Lansing left the company. but her successor, Electra Leonard, sang just as well and, once past an initial nervousness. acted Margot in passable fashion. It is a rich production of one of Chicago's favorite operettas. Greek Evans brings the house down with One Alone and is every bit as good .1 Red Shadow as Alexander Grey. Of the rest. Olga Rosenova makes a very sultry Azun: basso Dunsmure is right as Ali; and Isaa. Van Grove waves a very persuasive baton It's the bargain for which Chicago is looking 26 The Chicagoan PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL STON E-B.AYMOR. LTD. ALLAN JONES He reminds Ashton Stevens of Chauncey Olcott; Charles Collins of ]ac\ Bar ry more; Claudia Cassidy of Charles Farrell; Lloyd Lewis of Dennis King. Besides, he is alleged to be an excellent boxer and an imposing figure on a horse along the bridle paths of La\e Shore Drive. In spite of all these handicaps, he he is one of the best of the many Von Schobers ivho have ornamented the varv ous productions of Blossom Time and easily the most attractive prince of the many Student Princes who have warbled their way through Heidelberg. Noah's Ark Notes on the Believe-It-or-Nots of Field Museum By Ruth G. Bergman WHAT is it that has roots in Somaliland and Yucatan, Ven ezuela and Java, Sumatra, Alaska, Turkestan, Baffinland, Wrangell Island and Abyssinia? What is it, in other words, that has roots in both hemispheres and practically from pole to pole, yet blooms the year around in Chicago? There is no catch to this riddle and the solution is apparent to all who read the Chicago papers or run through Grant Park. The answer is the Field Museum. Though that substantial pile of marble on the lake front is planted simply on wooden piles, the living organism of the museum has sent its roots down to the antipodes — and then some. In other words, the luxuriant growth in Grant Park which seems to be completely developed is living and growing and drawing its sustenance from the far and near corners of the earth. Its food is knowledge, its appetite voracious and increasing with age. At first this hunger was appeased by contributions from such near neighbors as Mexico, Santo Domingo and Alaska. That was in 1894. In the last ten years museum feed has come from North America, South America, Africa and Asia, to mention only a few of the more important continents. Afoot and on horseback, muleback, camelback and elephantback, by train and motor and steamship and canoe, in boots and on skis, men have been foraging for the Field Museum. An itinerary of its expeditions would look like the index of an atlas. Its botanists have gathered specimens in the Antillean Islands, Brazil, the West Indies, the East Indies, Peru, Labrador, in the Orient, up and down the Amazon and even in most sections of the United States. One of the first expeditions went to Yucatan and other parts of Mexico to gather anthropological material. At about the same time, the late Edward E. Ayer, first president of the museum, brought important archeological collections from Egypt and Italy. Very early in its history, too, the museum began its famous researches among the Indians. The Hopis received attention first. Next came a series of expeditions that resulted in important collections from numerous other tribes. Having thus seen America first, the museum sent a group of anthropologists to China and Tibet for three years of search and research that ended in a total catch of more than 10,000 objects, many of which were extremely rare. By way of diversifying the collections, one curator took a little anthropological trip to Peru, India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, New Ireland, Buka, Bougainville, New Guinea and the Philippines. One of the most important activities of the Depart ment of Anthropology is the expedition to Mesopotamia undertaken in cooperation with Oxford University. Excavations at the ancient city of Kish, seat of what was probably the world's first civilization, have uncovered many chapters in the very early history of man, and digging down through layer after layer of ancient cultures the arche- ologists have added much to the world's knowledge of how the B. C. man kx)ked and what he did and believed. Among the interesting revelations here was the discovery of two wooden chariots which established the existence of efficient transportation facilities some 5100 years ago. In the meanwhile, the Departments of Geology and Zoology have also been keeping the Field fires burning with plenty of fuel from abroad, witness the museum's collection of volcanic and glacial mate rial and ores, minerals from Mexico, Cambrian and Trenton fossils from Wisconsin, and fossil mammals picked out of the North Amer ican rock structure here, there and everywhere, not to mention the remains of many prehistoric animals of Argentina, gems and minerals from Brazil, much Mongolian material, including dinosaur eggs and other little tidbits. Since the search for knowledge either in the field or in the library is always thrilling to its practitioners, one should avoid invidious comparisons, but it is safe to say that no branch of the museum's work has been as spectacular and as interesting to the public as that conducted by the zoologists. While it may be just as soul satisfying to bag an extinct dinosaur as it is to shoot a contemporary lion, it is certainly less hair raising, and that is why the history of the Depart ment of Zoology, more than that of the other divisions, closely resembles a long and thrilling adventure story with physical exploits running neck and neck with mental feats. The first zoological expedi tion went, naturally, to Africa, where the game yield was big and abundant. Southern Mexico and California contributed a fine collec tion of fishes and reptiles and one of the museum's curators discovered several new species of mammals in Sierra Nevada and Death Valley, California. Back in Africa, a second expedition obtained approxi mately 2,500 specimens. From that time on, zoologists have con tinued to scour the earth and explore the waters under the earth. During the construction of the Panama Canal, for example, one of the curators made exhaustive collections and studies of the fishes of the isthmus. In 1929 the Field Museum- Williamson Undersea Expe dition set out for the Bahamas with special equipment for observing submarine life. As a result the world was enriched by much new- knowledge and the museum obtained an extensive collection of under sea fauna including one palmate coral that weighed some two tons and measured nearly eleven by six feet. Like the fishes of the sea, the fowl of the air, also, have flocked to the museum from South America and Canada, from Alaska and Africa. Colonel Theodore Roosevelt and his brother, Kermit Roosevelt, led two expeditions. Their first objective was the capture of a few Marco Polo sheep and Asiatic ibex, speci mens of which they obtained in the Thian Shan Mountains of Turkestan and on the Pamir plateau. In the course of their extensive travels in southern Asia they collected many other large mammals. The second expedition which went to remote parts of French Indo- China and southern China gave the Roosevelts the distinction of being the first white men ever to procure a giant panda, one of the world's rarest animals. In addition to this prize, the expedition netted some 15,000 other zoological specimens. And so that great Noah's Ark on the lake front has continued to assemble specimens from Texas and Siberia and Abyssinia and Brazil, the islands of the South Pacific, Borneo, Kenya, Uganda, the Congo, India and other points north, east, south and west. In consideration whereof one begins to wonder if the Field Museum is not the excep tion to the rule that the whole is equal to the sum of its parts. How- could one building hold so much of the material from which knowledge is refined? The answer is that it doesn't. The museum is not complete as it stands in Grant Park. Bits of it are lodged in other museums, in libraries, and institutions of higher learning all around the world, and other bits in thousands of Chicago homes and in every public school and many of the private schools of the city. It flows in a constant stream of publications and loan exhibits to any place where there is a thirst for natural history. This is one of the fruits of the unceasing scientific research carried on in the field by the museum's expeditionary forces and at home where specimens can be studied in more detail. How detailed detail can be might be indicated by one example: The museum has actually delved so far into ancient history that it has come out with X-ray pictures of extremely ancient Egyptians. This is neither a tall story nor an anachronism. The museum has its own modern and completely equipped Department of Roentgenology which has looked into the matter of mummies and discovered many- facts which the ancients thought they had completely covered up thousands of years ago. By means of this X-ray laboratory all depart ments of the museum may make careful studies of the interior struc ture of specimens without dissecting or otherwise injuring them. The museum also maintains a staff of photographers, photogravurists and artists to illustrate its publications and prepare pictures needed in the work of the scientific staff. Another fact that the mere observer would not suspect is that the museum has its own large and complete book and job printing and binding plant, fully equipped with type setting machinery, presses and other apparatus for the purpose ot passing on to the rest of the world the discoveries that the scientific staff is in the habit of making. These (Continued on page 64) 28 The Chicagoan Urban Phenomena A Sophisticate 9s Tour of the Old World ELLINGTON HALL, CHURCH STOKE, MONTGOMERYSHIRE, ENGLAND.— We 've never bragged about Chicago weather in mid-winter. . . We're decidedly NOT optimists (not any more) about slush underfoot and a nasty, raw wind. Also, we might add, we are a little fed up with Musical Comedies, the Saturday Battle at the Bal, Everyone's Lecture Course, Bridge Games and our Best Friends Faces and Wardrobes. We've stood about enough of this . . . what with all the travel bureaus writing us daily about their cruises to delight ful places where the Sun Shines occasionally and golashes are unheard of. We have studied with longing the pictures in Vogue of Languid Ladies lolling on Beaches in Schiapa- relli's latest "pajams." A great uncontrollable urge is upon us to Go Places, and See People and Do Things ... its prolly the Gypsy in us ... a sort of Hail and Farewell idea. Anywho we've made up our minds to be off and now we are indulging ourselves in a feminine orgy of Preparation. We have spent a week in New York seeing the new Box Office Hits and Shopping like Mad for Tweeds at Fortnum and Mason and evening gowns at Hattie Carnegie. At last, with just enough of everything and not too much of anything packed into the smartest of Pigskin and Feel ing very much the Lady of Fashion, we are Actually On Our Way. There is prolly nothing quite as exciting as hanging over the rail of a ocean liner and watching the Manhattan Sky Line gently but majestically slip away. Sky Scrapers ... a mass of modernistic columns against a sun-set ... the eerie note of the fog horns ... the shrill whistles of the ferry boats . . . the Statue of Liberty, gigantic guardian, gradually growing smaller against the horizon until she is only a smoke grey spot in a dusky sky . . . the waves lapping up against the side of the ship . . . the refreshing smell of damp salty air. Life wc have decided suddenly . . . Is Good! Down in our cabin we have childishly ar ranged our Bon Voyage Baskets in a pyramid (wondering, the while how any human could 'jet away with so much fruit and candy in one week) and dressed in our most fetching brown and gold frock and then at the last minute m- re wed on those devilish Spanish Gold ear rings because wc felt Romantic and having ardently read the stories in the Cosmopolitan for Many Years ... we are sure that Any thing can Happen on Boats. After a cocktail in the Bar (feeling Pretty Wicked) we go down to dinner. The dining room steward in forms us that we are to be guests at the Purser's table . . . already so queek we are lucky, think we. By the middle of dinner, however we have definitely changed our minds. The most exciting thing the Good Purser ever did was to play with some Mexican Jumping Beans! By Virginia Sk inkle while the other guests are equally as entertain ing; A Meloncholy Scotch Lassie aged thirty- five weighing one hundred and ninety-eight pounds and dressed in baby blue, a scrawny English lady with a large nose, small eyes and a mania for Bridge, a German Gentleman who liked to Eat but Never Laughed. All very Gay! Wc declined all invitations to leap into a waltz with these Devastating Gentle men in the Lounge and retired to our cabin. We decide to Shun Society and Dine in Solitary Splendor for the rest of the voyage. After all good brisk walks around the deck and a nice book to read in a Steamer Chair, have their advantages. However the second day out the ship took on a definitely rolling motion which gradually became more pro nounced. The few passengers who still strug gled around the deck courageously were do ing an unconscious imitation of the Rumba. When we have had just about enough of this we (Thank Fortune) reach Cherbourg . . . going through the cus toms . . . dashing for the Boat Train . . . hours of flat French countryside, spotted here and there with occassional farms . . . Paris at last! The Gare du Nord . . . the amusing Toot Toot of the taxi horns "Attention, ici Madame" . . . Paris, the most thrilling city in the world . . . we plunge into a round of mad activity. A morning ride in the Bois du Boulogne steel grey daylight through jade green moss . . . wc stop at Chateau Madrid for an eleven o'clock porto and watch the people riding up on horseback to have breakfast under the trees . . . back to Ciro's for luncheon . . . beautiful women wearing enormous emeralds . . . the Ritz Bar for five O'clock cocktails with a marvelous conglomeration of nationalities (now we know why it is nick-named "the monkey cage") . . . Fouquet's to dine . . . Harry's from ten until midnight (called 'The Jumping Off Place") Florida to tango on a glass floor . . . Chez Florence for corned beef hash and a negro band ... a horse and buggy ride up to Sacre Coeur to watch the sun set . . . Les Halles (the market place) to the famous old cafe, Pere Tranquille for onion soup and back to our hotel with arm loads of snow white roses and blue violets and the sun shine streaming through the shutters. Weeks of Paris ... the sidewalk cafes, the studios in the Latin Quarter, the book stalls, the flower markets, the tantalizing shops on the Rue de Rivoli and the Rue de la Paix and wc are off again to follow the sunshine to the Riviera. A two day drive down the Rhone River Val ley passed little thatched villages down roads lined with Normandy Poplars through the ancient city of Avignon with its Roman wall to Cannes. The Cornich Drive along a mountain side with the Mediterranean below us . . . orange trees, mimosa, palms . . . pink villas, yellow villas, blue villas. Cannes, city of sunshine and music and flowers. The ten nis matches . . . lunching on the terrace under a gaily striped umbrella, having tea on some body's yacht in the harbour . . . dining in a villa half way up the hillside . . . dancing at the Casino. Daily trips to Nice and Antibes and Monte Carlo and finally a desire to find even more sunshine in Italy. IvOME . . . the splendor of old ruins . . . the majesty of great churches . . . the city of da Vinci and Rafael . . . cypress trees and moonlight . . . the mellow beauty of antiquity. We indulge in an orgy of sight seeing . . . the Coliseum, the Forum, Saint Peter's, the Via Sacra, the Catacombs, the art galleries and a tea dance at the Russie to prove we're still Human! Armed with a suit case full of picture post cards and Heaven knows how much Italian Tooled Leather, we're off again for a week of winter sports in Switzerland. The Palace Hotel at St. Moritz ... the bar filled with amusing people in bright skiing costumes planning a bob sled party up the mountain . . . Billy Reardon, Michael Aden and his beautiful wife, Count Saint Juste. Sharp, clear air . . . sparkling sunshine on silver snow . . . the Oxford-Cambridge ice hockey match . . . dinner dancing at the Palace after a days skating . . . moonlight sleigh ride to an Inn way up the mountain . . . where wc stop for a midnight supper before a roaring fire . . . Holiday Time, Good Old Carnival Spirit. Were off again for England. London . . . Trafalgar Squarc . . . Piccadilly Circus . . . Bond Street . . . Everyone humming the tunes from Noel Coward's new show Words and Music . . . Gertrude Lawrence in Van Druten's play, Behold, We Live at St. James' . . . luncheon at the Blue Train . . . dinner at the Savoy . . . the Embassy or the Cafe de Paris for supper dancing . . . tea with the Gerald Wellcslcys (Betty Ball) in their lovely flat on Cork Street ... a handful of entertaining people . . . dark wood panneling and old English silver. A week-end houseparty in Shropshire in a Tudor castle . . . grey stone turrets, ivy cov ered, a cobble stone court yard, great yew trees trimmed into amusing shapes, roses growing in the garden in December . . . rows upon rows of portraits and mellow old books. A Hunt Ball at Condovcr Castle . . . men in full di-ess with "pink" coats or dressed in the costume of their particular Hunt club . . . standing in colorful groups in the Great Hall talking, exchanging dances on your program, sitting around the fire in the library sipping champagne, waltzing in the ballroom. Another houseparty at Stokesay Court. . . Meeting early in the morning in tweeds (Continued on page 65) February, 193 3 29 Sub-Urban Phenomena Ory as You Might Gather, Unusual Occurances in the Suburbs WHILE the author of Urban Phenom ena was honeymooning on the other side of the Atlantic, we decided to borrow the capital of her column (borrowing capital is mighty good business these days if you can manage it) and adjust it to our own use for this month, at least. Sub'Urban Phenomena is the title we want to assume for one brief glorious moment, the reason being that several interesting suburban incidents have come to our surprised and shocked attention within the past few weeks- incidents having to do with certain of our fel low citizens and the "Eight o'Clock," best known of the trains plying their way between Lake Forest and the busy marts of trade. Also with an amazing lack of judgment concerning the comparative values of fifteen minutes and a long and healthy life. They were brought to light by an accident to one of our newest commuters, A. D. Plamondon, Jr., who with his wife and family have taken the Hale Holden, Jr., house in Lake Forest for this year and next. It seems that one morning not long ago, Mr. Plamon don was driven to the station, only to see the eight o'clock moving down the tracks toward town. Deciding that he could make the train at Highland Park, he told his chaffeur to head south and step on the gas, but alas, when he reached Highland Park, the train was again just pulling out of the station. Without pausing to consider that there was another train in fifteen minutes or that busi ness at this point is anything but pressing — or any of the thousand and one things that would have prevented all sorts of pain and trouble, he made up his mind to "flip" it. With a flying leap he caught the hand rails — but his feet missed the step! Fortunately several passengers and train officials were watching (there's never a con ductor or brakeman who isn't on the lookout for just such accidents, hating and fearing them with a whole-souled passion) and in a moment the train was brought to a stop. But not before Mr. Plamondon had been flung to the ground, very badly bruised and terribly shaken, his clothes cut to ribbons and with a shock to his nervous system that is taking weeks to get over. For some time he was too chagrined to con fess to his family and friends just what had happened, but when the story finally got around, all sorts of similar accidents were un earthed, exciting tidbits for dinner table con versation—the morning when one of the members of the house of Forgan (David, Jr., I believe) had almost exactly the same experi ence and found that in his efforts to steady himself he had actually braced his feet against one of the wheels of the train — another occa sion when a young Lake Forester was prob ably saved from death by the quick action of a conductor standing on the train step, who planted his boot firmly in the young man's By Caroline S. Krum middle, throwing him back to the safety of the station platform — and the attempt of a well known architect to jump from a moving train (he had forgotten he was getting off at Evanston) only to find himself hurled several yards along the platform, covered with black and blue marks, and the owner of a suit of clothes that only the most expert of tailors was able to repair. Another of these early morning adventures — and the only one with an even slightly amusing flavor — has to do with Bob Wam- boldt, Virginia FitzHugh's husband, who is an ardent (and skillful) contract player, and who, ever since he began commuting in this part of the world, has been a member of a certain train foursome. One day he failed to put in an appearance at the customary time — not until the train had stopped at Highland Park did he enter the smoker. Walking unconcernedly along the aisle he joined his cronies and reached for the pack of cards. Only then did he — and his companions notice that his hands were a sinister and very grimy black. On be ing questioned, he finally admitted that he had arrived at the station (on the wrong side of the track) as the train was pulling out, and that he had jumped from his car, leaving the motor running in his haste, and ridden the cowcatcher from Lake Forest to Highland Park! For the past six or eight weeks Chicago fashionables have had a very merry time of it, socially speaking. Of course, during the holidays every engagement calendar was crowded with luncheons, teas, dinners and dances, but the lull that usually sets in at the end of the Christmas and New Year festivities, seems to have been lacking this year. Palm Beach and Miami, Nassau and Havana, Europe and California, have all ACME MR. AND MRS. JOHN ALDEN CARPENTER LEAVING THE OLD LOWELL HOME IN CAMBRIDGE AFTER THEIR WEDDING JANUARY 30. claimed if not their customary quota of our pretty people, at least a fairly representative share, the times being what they are. But in return, we've had a perfect deluge of inter esting visitors to be greeted, feted and gen erally made welcome. On the January roster were Mrs. Franklin Roosevelt, Herman Gade, Victoria Sackville-West, Howard Scott, the Oxford group of the Buchmanites (for a mo ment it looked as if the conversation stirred up by their visit would crowd technocracy, the Russian situation, prohibition and the prevail ing contract bridge controversies quite off the boards) as well as a host of other equally- celebrated or lesser lights, to each one of whom was accorded his or her full share of hospitality, one of the few things that can still be handed out in a large way. Weekends in the country — in Wisconsin or nearer home in Lake Forest, Barrington, Wheaton and other of our attractive outskirt communities — have been very popular this winter. Sometimes the Friday to Monday gatherings are made up of a series of entcr- tainings, large and small, when the visiting coterie is rushed from luncheon to cocktails to dinner and to dance. But mostly one's leisure hours are spent out of doors, on horseback. weather permitting, or skating, ski-ing, hiking and coasting. The Thursday night supper dances at the Deerpath Inn in Lake Forest, which Mrs. LJri Grannis and Mrs. Jack Pitcher have put on the social map out that way, have proved definite successes. And the progressive party- appetizers to dinner to dancing — given the last Saturday in January for pretty Marjorie Goodman by two of her aunts, Mrs. Billy Odell and Mrs. Charles Isaacs, was voted one of the highlights of the late winter season, not only by the group of youngers for whom it was really intended, but by the dozen or so young married people included in the festivi ties. The preceding night, Miss Goodman along with Francise Clow, younger daughter of the junior William E. Clows, was guest of honor at another chi-chi and vastly amusing party the dinner and scavenger hunt given by the Howard Linns, which did much to upset the ordered routine of the near north side during the course of the evening, but which proveJ great fun for everyone concerned. Speaking of evening amusements — and this on a quieter order, for those occasions when a grate fire and a small group of congenial souls are concerned — there is an entertaining new game going the rounds. As far as I know, it has no name, but it might well be called alphabet golf, for it has to do with letters, par. intelligence and alertness. Anyway, here s how it's done: The victim chosen for the test is told that at a given second, a certain letter of the alphabet will be mentioned and that he is te give every word he (Continued on page 6*) 30 The Chicagoan THE COMMANDING TOWER OF THE GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING THE TIMES AND THE FAIR A Convert Makes His Report By MILTON S. MAYER PHOTOGRAPHS BY A. GEORGE MILLER Came Christmas, some few weeks back, and I set off on my annual hegira to what Joseph Hergesheimer and I call the Deep South. My goal was Selma, a teeming metropolis of 15,000 souls (including the game warden) in the heart of Alabama, whose state motto is "Here We Rest," and whose citizens just rest and rest and rest. There it is my custom to set myself up as a great fellow, a wiseacre from the big city, and to sound off on any and all subjects for the benefit of the country cousins. If they have any questions to ask, I am the man to answer them. It's a wonder I haven't told them how to grow cotton. Selma, Alabama, affords probably as typical an example of PORTION OF THE INTERIOR OF THE GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING the country-town viewpoint of the nation as any other country town anywhere. The philosophy of the citizens shifts with the supply and demand of what the good earth produces. Where Kansas is suffering from depressed wheat, Pennsylvania from depressed anthracite, and Wisconsin from depressed applejack, Alabama is suffering from five-cent cotton. The dues at the Country Club have come down; the counters of Tepper Brothers, Where a Child Can Buy, gather dust; Clark Gable doesn't fill the Academy Theatre at reduced rates. Because the paternal attitude of white towards black still persists, the dis tressed are a little better cared for in the cotton country than in, say, the corn country; otherwise conditions are the same. One prominent citizen of Selma who refuses to be overawed by the slicker from Chicago is my Uncle Max. Uncle Max reads the New York Times and thinks in larger terms than are com monly expressed in the cane-seat rockers in front of the Hotel Albert. Every so often Uncle Max pops a question that embarrasses me. Sitting on the porch after dinner one night (you sit on the porch around Christmas in Selma) , the leading citizens of Selma got to talking about the World's Fair. Yes, they had heard about the Fair. They were excited about it. They were satis- LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE AGRICULTURAL BUILDING TOWARD THE STATES GROUP bed that it was going to be a great show, well worth coming irom Alabama and spending fifty cents to see. And one way or another — beg, borrow, or steal — they were all coming to see it. Cotton might go down to a Confederate cent, they averred, but as long as they had a shirt on their back, and even when that was gone, they were coming to the Fair. They had been going to fairs all their lives, and they were not going to miss the best one ever just because the wolf was at the door and the mortgage on the roof. This all sat very well with me. They asked, in deferential tones, what the buildings looked like, what the accommodations were, what the hootchy-koochy girls were going to do. Their enthusiasm far exceeded that of their fellow-Americans who live within shouting distance of the Fair itself. I answered their questions in pontifical phrases and impressed them with the breadth of my information. Then, of a sudden, out of a chunk of darkness in one corner, a voice said: 'How the devil can they put on a luxury like a world's fair when business houses producing necessities are going broke?" Uncle Max again! My bravado failed me. About the best I could do by way of putting Uncle Max in his place was to explain that A Century of Progress was being run honestly, which made it almost unique in the history of American busi ness enterprises, that the men who were running it didn't reveal, on fairly close scrutiny, any fears for its success, and that about three hundred of the nation's principal corporations, all of them ostensibly going broke, were sinking anywhere from $50,000 to $1,500,000 apiece in the proposition. The whole front porch seemed satisfied — except (I realized somehow) Uncle Max. He didn't say anything. Being a smart-aleck from Chicago, I was not going to let my Selma (Ala.) uncle put me on the spot if I could help it. How could they put on a world's fair in times like these, anyway? If I could not answer that question satisfactorily, I decided, I would henceforth steer clear of Selma, Alabama, fond as I was of the people, the partridges, and the chinaberry blossoms. So I came back to Chicago charged with the determination to answer that question. I marched up to the Administration Building and demanded, with my eye glittering like Gen. An drew Jackson's, to see Maj. Lohr — the head man. I was in formed not only that I could see Maj. Lohr, but that Maj. Lohr was looking for me. When I got into his office, the major waved me into a chair and asked me if there were any questions I'd like to ask about the Fair. There were some; and since the major had brought me down on his own head, I let go with both barrels. I thought I'd have him squealing in about ten minutes. Well, sir, after I had court-martialed him for half an hour, without disturbing his aplomb, he asked me if there were any figures on the Exposition I should like to see. There were some; and I saw them. After I left his office I moseyed around the myriad departments, asking questions — and getting answers. I wanted to know how they could put on a World's Fair in times like these. I had been determined, from the beginning, to write honestly and unemotionally about A Century of Progress. I wanted to talk about the rain as well as the sunshine, the lean as well as the fat. I felt that there were a sufficient number of people — (a small, but perhaps important, percentage of the newspaper readers) — who were suspicious of enthusiasm to justify my pre sentation of both sides of the picture. There was a certain FIGURED FACADE OF THE ELECTRICAL GROUP. amount of unvoiced pressure on me to "let well enough alone" and stick to the bright side of the road. I knew, for instance, although the advertising manager of The Chicagoan did not take me to one side and deliver an impassioned sermon, that prospective advertisers are not endeared to periodicals that tell how rotten things are and what's the use of trying. Then, too, I had friends who were doing their damnedest to make the Expo sition great. And the Fair itself, I realized, was a noble project, a mighty boon to the city — and Chicago, although it has come to low estate, was my native heath — my grandfather had taken his turn patrolling the streets after the Fire, and my Pa had peddled papers here when Hayes beat Tilden. But the pressure couldn't have been very strong, or, being of a tractable disposi tion, I should have yielded. So it was in an unrepentent mood of stern and forbidding judgment, of consecration to the fast-disappearing ideals of independent journalism, that the investigation was begun, to determine just how a world's fair and a depression could pull in double harness. In the swaddling stages of the Exposition, even after Gen. Charles G. Dawes had succeeded Samuel Insull, who had retired as chairman of the Fair's finance committee the better to eat you with, my dear, there was talk of further bond issues to supplement the $10,000,000 one that had been floated. Esti mates as to the cost of the Exposition ran as high as $100,000,000. And, mind you, these additional bond issues and $100,000,000 estimates were not suggested by Mr. Insull, but by conservative gentlemen who are still able to look at the Statue of Liberty from the rear. In 1929 conservative estimates had a habit of running well into nine figures. In the early months of 1930 it began to appear to far-sighted people, if not to Mr. Hoover, that the misery was here to stay for a while, and the revision era set in. Corporations that were pretty far in the hole and corporations that were playing fast and loose did not find it easy to revise. But A Century of Progress was in neither of these catagories; it was still on blue prints. The best minds of the city, serving as trustees of the Fair, met with the Exposition's president, Rufus Dawes, and it< general manager, Maj. Lohr, and, acting in concert, the men who see fairs in dollars-and-cents and the men who see them in buildings-and-people decided to proceed on the assumption that the long hard winter might still be in operation on June 1, 1933. Together they abandoned visions of bond issues, divided esti mates by five and lopped off the lion's share of every budget. When they had finished, they had a string of budgets based on the incredible theory that conditions would not have improved one iota by the time the Exposition was ready to open. The dollars-and-cents men turned to the buildings-and-people men and said: "Can you build a world's fair on this?" And the buildings-and-people men, after some very extensive pencil-chewing on their own part, announced that they could. And they have. The incredible theory turned to fact; condi tions have not improved one iota; A Century of Progress has been built on the minimum estimate compiled two-and-a-half years ago by pessimistic bankers and business men. Perhaps The Chicagoan SYMPHONY IN STEEL — HALL OF SCIENCE BEYOND. the first question that comes to the mind of the innocent and uninformed bystander is, "Will it be as good a fair as it would have been in 1929?" The correct answer is surprising — it is Yes." And it takes some explaining. Every structure that appeared on the original plans for the exposition two-and-a-half years ago is now under construction. Ground was broken for the last of these more than two months ago. There is one exception to this. The Tower of Water and Light, a gaudy but not neat project originally included in the blueprints, was abandoned for the Skyride. The Skyride which was not included in the original plans, is a far more novel and exciting feature costing three times as much as the Tower of Water and Light. Here then, on the face of it, is a paradox: the same — or an even better — exposition costing not more than half of the original estimate. How did they do it? If the Harding-Coolidge-Hoover era had not slipped into reverse, the principal buildings of the Exposition would have been constructed by the Exposition itself, on funds obtained through the floating of bond issues. Under the stress of depression, a unique plan in world's fairs was devised, whereby corporations not only build their own buildings and install their own exhibits but also, as in the case of the million-dollar Sky ride, band together in the erection of concessions which they are confident will repay the investment through a percentage of the gate." Thus we have American Radiator, Johns-Manville, Chrysler, Sears-Roebuck, and so on, erecting their own build ings — major features of the exposition. Thus, e. g., instead of President Dawes and General Manager Lohr scratching their polls and asking each other what they should put in the Auto mobile Building, we have the executives of General Motors scratching their polls and asking each other the same question — and deciding to install a model assembly plant, in which the curious may watch (and, incidentally, purchase) Cheverolets in the making. Thus we have a group of four great corporations — - manufacturing steel, power, bridges, elevators — investing their own money and their own extensive talents in the Skyride, which is not only decorative but has the additional quality of being productive of enough revenue to repay — and more — the investment of the four corporations. That is depression item No. 1. Item No. 2 has to do with credit. A Century of Progress is being built with three kinds of credit — the sale of $10,000,000 worth of bonds; the part-pay ment of employees and contractors with bonds; and "charge account" credit with corporations furnishing supplies. The bonds, now more than 80% taken up, could have been sold — and more easily, no doubt — in flush times. But could the second. and third kinds of credit have been obtained in 1929? Not on your tintype. In the pre-depression era contractors and admin* istrative employees did business on a strictly cash basis, and; local business organizations demanded cash from world's fairs. February, 1933 RISING STANDARDS OF THE SKYRIDE, FROM ISLAND TERMINAL In the instance of each kind of credit, we see the same essential factor: faith in the success of the Exposition — and in a time when faith in anything is a rare and lovely flower. Item No. 3 is by far the most significant: it is the matter of costs. When all the people, including the people who run world's fairs, have half as much money to buy things and have to buy just as much as when they had twice as much money, the prices of things adjust themselves, a little slowly perhaps, to the halved purchasing power. Now the Fair began purchasing labor and supplies in the summer of 1930, when prices were already on the skids, and purchases have continued on an almost steadily declining market. An official of the Exposition estimates that the ultimate cost of construction will be from 50% to 60% below the 1929 market; the same fair would have cost almost twice as much during the boom days. Low bids on construction jobs have averaged 25% below the Fair's own estimates. Men want work, and badly. There is almost no other con struction going in the city — or in the nation, for that matter. When a contractor finishes a job, he can let his heavy equip ment remain idle on the grounds, so that when he bids for the next job he does not have to add in the cost of bringing his equipment to the spot. There have been no labor troubles, no strikes — and not only are strikes a popular accessory of depres sions, but "time jobs," such as world's fairs, have been peculiarly subject to them in the past. To turn from the group that Mr. Thomas calls "workers with hand" to the group which Mr. Thomas calls "workers with brain," we find an arresting example of benevolent depression in the Administration Building of the Fair. We have already noted that a percentage of every salary (the larger the salary. the larger the percentage) is paid in bonds. But salaries and time clocks do not make a world's fair. There must be an esprit among the workers, because they are the builders of an institution that will fail unless it exudes esprit from every brick and beam. Almost without exception, the men and women who are directing this exposition left well-paid jobs — better-paying jobs than they now hold. Why? Because they wanted a hand in putting on a world's fair. And the depression, with the resultant flood of doubt and skepticism among the citizenry, has bound these "workers with brain" closer together. Each sneer. each blow, each disappointment has resulted in a tightening of the lips and a "By gar, we'll show 'em." There is no such esprit in boom times. The eight-hour day is a fourteen-hour day at the Fair. Two of the major executives — Dr. Moulton and Col. Sewell — collapsed as a result of overwork; how Maj. Lohr main tains his equilibrium is a mystery to those who know his schedule. And the esprit bred of depression is not confined to the Administration Building. The determination to "put it over" SKELETON DETAIL OF THE SKYRIDE's WESTERN TERMINUS has caught on outside. The ranks of the scornful are sadly depleted. Each week brings a score of unsolicited offers of cooperation from hitherto indifferent organizations. It is like the closing days of a national campaign, when the victory is seen to be certain and the bandwagon-jumping begins. And in hack of all this lies the depression. When the administration gave up its hope of building a Hall of Music because it felt that such a feature might fail to pay for itself, a wave of perfectly magnificent enthusiasm swept through a considerable portion of the Town's active ladies and a $l-a- person campaign for a $100,000 Temple of Music was launched. When the Fair dropped its vision of an Art Museum because an Art Museum that would be worth a hoot would cost several million dollars, Dr. Harshe and his Art Institute dropped into the lap of the administration with plans to show the visitors the greatest collection ever assembled in America, a collection, when it is complete, worth something over $50,000,000. When the idea of financing a program of sports events appeared im practicable, Mr. Avery Brundage and the Amateur Athletic Union of the U. S. offered to award all their championship meets to Chicago, to be held at Soldier Field during the Fair. When you reflect that General Motors is better qualified than the Fair itself to put on an automobile exhibit, that Johns-Man ville is better qualified than the Fair itself to put on a housing exhibit, and that Dr. Harshe is better qualified than the Fair itself to put on an art exhibit, the double-edged wisdom of inviting outside corporations to erect major spectacles at the exposition becomes clear; and you, the innocent bystander, can but murmur your admiration, with a generous admixture of reverence, for the method in the madness of the Messrs. Dawes, Lohr, etc. The depression gave Rufus Dawes the inkling that any exhibit which is worth having ought to be made to pay for itself. There are two kinds of exhibits — those that are productive of revenue, and those that are not. The first group is composed principally of amusement features. Mr. Dawes — or Maj. Lohr — called the nation's showmen unto him and said, "Gentlemen, we are going to let you install the amusements. We'll leave the selection up to you. It might be worth your remembering that we are not underwriting any of your ventures; you are taking the risk." So, instead of a Midway cluttered with junk that will prove an eyesore and a debit, we see a very careful selection of joyrides that the leading showmen of the country are convinced will pay for themselves. The second, or non-productive, group of exhibits is composed principally of science features. There was some danger, and some fear in the hearts of its friends, that the Fair would be dominated by scientific exhibits, and, as you and all are aware, people do not come to a world's fair to go to school all over again. The scientists had large visions for A Century of Progress CIRCUMFERENCES AND DIAMETERS — THE HALL OF SCIENCE — among the items contemplated were (1) a real mountain, and (2) a mammoth insect, inside of which the customers would walk around and inspect the digestive tract, etc. Science exhibits can not very easily pay for themselves; but, thought Mr. Dawes, if they are really attractive some one will be willing to sponsor them for the advertising to be gained therefrom. So it was that the mountain and the insect and a score of other spectacles that would not have drawn the crowds were discarded and the fittest — from the point of view of a world's fair — have survived. The paragraphs above are intended to explain how a world's fair puts a depression to work. The fundamental depression items have been discussed. But there are a score of less easily reckoned ways in which hard times have helped and not hurt A Century of Progress. For instance: lack of funds is respon sible for much of the simplicity that characterizes the architec ture — and lol the architecture is the better for it. Frills and frippery and a thousand florid embellishments have been omitted. The Electrical Group is devoid of thousands of dollars of gaudy decorations that appear on the original model of it, and it is, observers agree, an improved Electrical Group. Corners have been cut everywhere and cut so judiciously that the beauty and the practicability of the exposition has never suffered and has frequently benefitted. Hundreds of thousands — not just thousands — of dollars have been saved on the land scaping alone, and you, when you shove your fifty cents under the wicket and walk in on June 1, will never know the differ ence. In an organization that is spending upwards of ten million dollars in two years, not a silver dime gets out of the exchequer before the question "Is it absolutely necessary to the holding of a world's fair?" has been answered. Not a shovel is turned, not a commitment is made, unless there is cash in the bank to see it through. Maj. Lohr does not pride himself on his snap judgments; he works on the [Continued on page 52) A SMART HAIRDRESS FOR LONGISH HAIR, BY CHARLES, FIELD'S LANCHERE SALON. THE SAME COIFFURE TRANSFORMED FOR EVENING WEAR BY A CORONET BRAID. Train Down and Freshen Up Spring Figures, Coiffures and Faces JUST before plunging into spring shopping is a good stock-taking time, even though the stock-taking may be a bit dishearten ing after the indulgences of a merry winter and perhaps a lazy one. A candid study of ourselves in the mirror may indicate a newly distressing bulge about the diaphragm, a thickened middle, or perhaps a drawn, scrawny look and droopy shoulders. Getting into line with a graceful, willowy slenderness is not so much a problem of pounds as it is one of inches. You may diet ascetic- ally and end with nothing but a sagging neck and drawn face but with the same old hips. You may take a freak food or freak drug and end with a ruined digestive system and per haps permanently impaired health. That is why one of the best investments is an investment in a systematic course of recon ditioning under expert supervision. You may need a controlled diet but it will be well- balanced and satisfying; you may need exer cise but it will be designed to correct posture, build poise and grace, to stimulate circulation, rather than develop muscular arms and calves like a Channel swimmer. You almost cer tainly need massage and special treatments whether your need is to fill out hollows or melt inches off fatty spots. Below are listed some of the local studios which will take you in hand and whittle away the inches sanely and successfully. The first step in your course is an individual diagnosis of your problems, an examination, weighing and measuring to see just which pro portions need correction. Nearly all of us then are benefited by some sort of cabinet bath — steam or electric or one of the special solution baths in which one of the salons specializes. In one salon, after the steam bath, you are led to a pleasantly warm table and wrapped By Marcia Vaughn in a ""garment" impregnated with the reducing solution, in another you cuddle up in a warm electric blanket. Both methods further the fatty cell liquefying process and soothe the nerves in heavenly fashion. This is usually followed by the massage treatment. You may be vigor ously paddled while still wrapped in the gar ment. When you are accustomed to this the garment is removed and you are paddled and rubbed till every inch of your body glows and joyful blood races through your veins. Several salons specialize in Swedish massage which is perfect for many purposes, the vigor ous massage for reducing, a gentle massage for body building, for circulation improve ment, nerve relaxation, correction of intestinal troubles and dozens of other desirable things. The exhilaration and happiness you feel after a massage is worth the treatment alone but there is more tangible evidence than this in the rapidly shrinking inches, increased vitality and endurance. You may add to your body course a course of exercises — not the stiff and boresome setting- up affairs we used to get in school but exer cises which are a lot of fun. Rolling and relaxing and stretching, kicking merrily as a colt, floating to music to develop grace and flowing lines, you enjoy every minute of your exercises and develop a supple feminine figure, a new challenge to age and a new challenge to depression of any kind. TTS a melancholy season for poor skins. The winds blow, the soft coal dust flies and set tles into pores, the water (Turn to page 61) THE SIDE VIEW OF THE SAME HAIRDRESS, BY PHILIP, LANCHERE SALON, MARSHALL FIELD. THIS LOVELY CLUSTER OF CURLS AND GRACEFUL SWIRL IS JUST RIGHT FOR NEW HATS. February, 1933 39 FINE HUNTING COUNTRY LIES ALL ABOUT THE PAGODA OF LIEN PHAI, INDO-CHINA. LIKE A JAPANESE PRINT MOUNT FUJI IS MIRRORED IN THE CLEAR WATERS OF LAKE KAWAGUCHI. THE GOLD PAVILION — KINKAKUJI — BUILT IN 1397 STILL HAS TRACES OF ITS ANCIENT GOLD FOIL COVERING. THE GINZA IN TOKYO IS ALWAYS BUSY WITH SHOPPERS FROM MANY LANDS AND BRILLIANTLY DECORATED. PHOTOGRAPHS ON THESE PAGES FROM JAPANESE TOURIST BUREAU, N. Y. K. STEAMSHIP LINES AND INDO-CHINA RAILWAYS GEISHA GIRLS STROLL ON THE QUAINT BRIDGES OF TOKYO PARKS LIKE ANIMATED TEACUP FIGURES. 40 The Chicagoan 0HS FANTASTIC ISLES RISE FROM THE WATERS OF THE BAY OF ALONG IN INDO-CHINA. The Old, Old Orient Discloses Some Bright New Charms By Lucia Lewis THINGS are always surprising in the Orient. We may think of Japan, for instance, as highly modernized with crack trains, crack armies and things all geared up for Standardization and Progress. Or we may dream of cherry blossoms, geisha girls, tea houses and Buddhas. In either case we are surprised. For Japan has many facets and is one of the few places where modernization has not spoiled the charm of the very old. The Orient is a continual challenge, some thing new bobs up at every turn and one must make continual mental adjustments all the way from the bustle of Tokyo to the ageless slum ber of Cambodia. But surprises and mental adjustments are pleasant things for tourists who are bored and world-weary. The first surprise is the nearness of the "remote" Orient. Fourteen days from San Francisco the ship docks at the great N. Y. K. p'ers in Yokohama and travelers are whisked off on electric trains to Tokyo in thirty-five minutes. Tokyo scurries about very briskly as any other great modern capital with its huge de partment stores and thriving hotels, the clang of workers on the new subway in the wide Showadori, the rattle of typewriters in the hundreds of office buildings and smart shops which line the Marynouchi and Nihon-Bashi. But the spirit of the East is still dominant and lies over everything with the old beauty. The Ginza is lined with willows and the parks Maze in a glory of true Oriental horticulture, the Imperial Palace still has its ancient moated walls and hundreds still gather about ancient shrines. Though buses and electric trolleys clatter through the city among their passen gers are many almond-eyed ladies with sleek Hack hair and colorful kimonos like the figures on our old teacups at home. You may stay at the Imperial and dine on choice French dishes — the cuisine here is the product of as skilled French chefs as you will find in Paris. But you may also clatter into a serene native restaurant with your Japanese or diplomat friends and sit on the floor con templating a vista of beauty in the garden which lies quiet and lovely at the back of the busiest streets. And there you can struggle with chopsticks over bowls of delectable suki- yaki, fried shrimp, and other Oriental dishes, sipping saki till you are glad you are on the floor so that there's no place to fall to. In sheer natural beauty Japan ranks high among the nations and in her people's appreciation of natural beauty she ranks perhaps higher than any other. The Japanese — rich and poor alike — travel to the country in droves to see the cherry blossoms and plum blossoms, and every little house has its bit of exquisite garden. Fuji is like the Taj Mahal. You have seen prints and prints and prints till you are pretty fed up on the thing. But when you really see Fujisan, silvery perfect with a cluster of brilliant lakes at its feet, you grasp its real beauty for the first time. There is an inexhaustible variety of natural and historic beauty in Japan for every tourist. Kegon Falls tumble three hundred feet down a steep mountain side of cryptomeria and maples . . . out of the shimmering mist of the Inland Sea fantastic islands rise and vanish like beautiful phantoms ... a great red torii (the torii beautifully represented in hundreds of famous Japanese prints) points out the heavenly Sacred Island Miyajima . . . Toyo- tomfs great castle looms at Osaka . . . the Daibutaden at Nara has the twelve hundred year old Buddha, the greatest bronze Buddha in the world . . . and everywhere the drift of flower petals, the smiling courtesy of the Japanese make these truly enchanted islands. All these beauties may be seen in quite western comfort too, though there is a special charm about bicycle jaunts to the more remote districts which the more enterprising traveler will undertake. On the railways nothing has been left undone to bring them up to the pitch of perfection, both as to safety and com fort. At the great Central Station in Tokyo electric signs show very clearly both in English and Japanese from what platform and at what time the trains leave, and other essential in formation. The steel trains were built in Japan, the first class sleeping rooms being fitted with a table, shelf, a metal bowl and accoutre ments, and a large fan. The redcaps carry your bag — any size — for ten sen, about two and a half cents. Most trains have excellent dining cars with European meals. Both Japanese and American passengers seem to enjoy the fruit, cereal, bacon and eggs, toast and coffee which are served for breakfast, and other tempting dishes that the French menus proclaim at midday and in the evening. Such meals cost from one yen, about twenty-five cents, to two yen, about fifty cents! The hotels in the leading cities and resorts are just as modern as those in America. The Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, of course, is known all over the world as the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. On the roof, gaily lighted by Japan ese lanterns, one is served beautifully with the artistic creations of master French chefs. And with all this luxury an excellent room and bath cost eight yen or about two dollars at the pres ent exchange. Other hotels such as the Nara at Nara, the Miyoko (Continued on page 54) feJL THE GREAT RED TORII GATE FAMILIAR TO ALL VISITORS TO THE SACRED (GATE) ISLAND, MIYAJIMA. February, 1933 41 HIGH HATS FOR HIGH EVENINGS ALONG with the flux of life in general and ¦ many things in particular, a gentleman's state of mind regarding his clothes, their cor rectness and good taste, has changed from time to time. But the requirements of the use of formal clothes are highly standardized and unrelenting — permitting almost no latitude either in color or general design. In the reception room above we are shown several men dressed in formal evening attire with such correctness and good taste that we (reader and writer), being only human beings after all, could hardly expect to emulate them. It is possible, however, depending a great deal upon one's individual carriage, of course. It may be noted that the clothes, correct and in good taste, to be sure, have nothing severe about them; they do not conform to rigid rules to the least detail. The two figures in the foreground are wear ing dress coats, the proportions and lines of which have been a bit accentuated by the artist in order to bring out the more important new features. Tails are longer this year; the shoulders broader, more full; the waistlines higher, more emphasized; trousers are full at the waist, very full at the thigh and knee and narrowing considerably at the bottom. One man is wearing a pique dress shirt in a basket weave, with two studs. (Small pearl studs are enjoying a renascence, and rightly, for they have a certain gentility and dignity about them.) The tie is a bat-wing or butterfly, single end style. The waistcoat is single breasted and V-shaped. The other figure is wearing a one stud shirt with white pique stripes, a tie with pointed ends, double style, and a double breasted waistcoat. Of the two figures in the back ground, one wears a silk hat, single breasted, button-through overcoat with a self-collar; the other wears an opera hat and a Chesterfield with fly front and velvet collar. Both wear the customary white gloves and white mufflers knotted in the Hackney manner — the throw" over or looped style — a change from the now too-prevalent Ascot throw. The figure descending the stairway i* dressed in a double-breasted overcoat with peeked lapels and velvet collar. Each figure, also, is wearing patent leather dress Oxfords" no pumps nor tipped shoes. Note, too, the absence of evening sticks. Further, it is truc that at every important ball and evening func tion this season it has been observed in almo^ every instance that the tail coat was worn ex clusively — which, after all, is correct. 42 The Chicagoan I Love A Parade In the Coats and Suits of Spring By The Chicagoenne m ., At. / /> THE extremely tailored suit couldn't be smarter than in its current manifes tation as shown at the top of the ac companying column. This is a Milgrim de sign at Saks-Fifth Avenue in a fine imported woolen, with the fashionable broken stripe effect in black and white. As in most of the spring suits the coat is quite short, and in this tailored type the shoulders are very, very trig and square cut with nice sharp lapels and an altogether up and at 'em effect about it. The red and white Ascot lends a dash of color and further trimness. With this a very jaunty topper is Saks' soft black felt which turns up slightly at the back (a lot of the spring hats do) and has the crown indented, giving a softer look than a strictly tailored crown. It is the "Pinch Punch" which you have been hearing about — the one that you can throw around, sit on, pack in a bag, and crush about to suit your self but which always emerges smiling. I he second suit is more in the dressmaker feeling — a two piece af fair in blue wool crepe with the dress very dashing in a print top of soft Paisley colors. The little jacket reaches barely to the waist and is lined in the same Paisley. It's the sleeves that give the softer look to this cos tume and very tricky they are, too. The dress sleeves are puffed and tied just below the elbow and the sleeves of the coat are split to show the luscious print. Under the coat the dress has a graceful V neck with a huge blue covered button at its left and a wide stitched belt fastened with a metal buckle. A charming thing for street wear and dressed up enough for afternoon occa sions; from Johnson and Harwood. There's untold swank in the jacket of the suit third from the top, from Charles A. Stevens' French Room. The three dinguses on the sleeves which look like epaulets are really the tiers of a little triple capelet caught in at the sleeves in front but swinging gracefully as a cape in back. Be low this the sleeves are severely fitted. Most of the sleeve interest in the new things is concentrated higher than the cuffs, giving a splendid chance for good-looking gloves. The coat and skirt are fitted and straight as most of the season's street things are. A faint whisper of the military is produced by the row of gray buttons. Coats don't swing about loosely but are usually buttoned firmly about one, fitting smoothly all the way down. The little upright collar is straight across the back and gradually widens to form the two throws which are worn Ascot fashion. As to coats — you will see that they too are buttoned trimly, fre quently in double-breasted effect with two rows of buttons set widely apart. The coat- dress from Sally K. Greenebaum does this, to form a smooth fitted line about the waist. This is in a green and white tweed, with a slightly open-weave effect, uausual in its lit tle belt at the back and the vestee effect of whaled pique, finely fluted at the edges. With this Sally Greenebaum shows a pill box beret of matching tweed. Fifth from the top is practically the most versatile coat I have seen. Mandel Brothers show it in a tweed mixture of soft grays and browns, the coat slim and smoothly fitting. The sleeves are tight-fit ting to the elbow where they whimsically go raglan, and interesting little inverted tucks shape the sleeves beautifully. It's the huge lapels which do all sorts of things to transform the coat about, as the mood strikes you. They dash about the neck to form a double collar in the back which may be turned to show either a solid brown or tweed mixture collar. Turned one way the lapels are all brown, as in the illustration; another way they may be all tweed or one may be tweed and the other brown. The great big brown button on one lapel adds another bit of interest. It's a grand coat for these days when we like to change about but must make fewer clothes do and are apt to get bored with the same old stuff alia time. The hat too is interesting in its fabric, which is a wide basket weave straw, and in shape, one of the flat new sailors, double- brimmed with a little bandeau in back to assure a jaunty tilt. For your opulent mo ments Millie Oppenheimer has a luxurious soft black wool, double rows of buttons too and narrowly belted. The rows of wide tucks above the elbow give a faintly leg of mutton effect to the sleeves, which helps to give further slimth to the hip line. An in teresting detail is the way the silver fox col lar is set under the neckline so that it is pleasantly cool for spring. The fox skin swoops from its closing in front to a square- cut effect in back. Watch this square collar — you will see more of it on many of the high fashion dresses and coats. For a smart knockabout costume in town or country Marjorie Letts shows the coat at the bottom of the column, a brown and beige tweed, in the new rather blurry check. This is beautifully and sim ply cut to wrap slimly about the figure, belted with soft brown leather. The widely set buttons give us more of the double-breasted idea. The buttons are repeated on the cuff and the dropped shoulder effect of the sleeves gives a delightful smart swing to the coat as you stride along on the avenue or down wind swept country lanes. ^r I Us \~ l§f§/;- ~^>t I <• 2^ f ¦S < -yv - ¦ X SUM UlflRT by flpPOinTmenT to H€R itirj€Stv THecHicflcofln ART GALLERIES M. O'BRIEN & SON Established 1855 A comprehensive exhibit of etchings by John Sloan. New dog etchings by Mar guerite Kirmse. We maintain our own shop for the correct framing and restoring of pictures. 673 North Michigan Superior 2270 ANTIQUES THE OHM GALLERY Old Masters Paintings at Moderate Prices Modern Pictures - Antiques 3 1 Diana Court 540 N. Michigan Superior 7100 BOOKS Strange and Exotic Books WILLIAM TARG, Bookseller 808 ]/2 N. Clark St. CATERERS JOSEPH H. BIGGS 50 E. Huron Fine catering in all its branches. Estimates furnished for luncheons, dinners, weddings, musicals, afternoon teas, and all social functions. Superior 0900-0901 CATERING BY GAPER Provides the utmost in excellence of cui sine, distinguished appointments and flaw less service. JOHN B. GAPER CATERING CO. 161 E. Chicago Ave. Superior 8736 CORSETS THE CORSET HOSPITAL Rejuvenates old foundation garments — spe cializes in redesigning, cleaning and repair ing of any corsets. MRS. L. M. MAC PHERSON I 5 E. Washington Street 609 Venetian Building Dearborn 6765 FRENCH PASTRY MRS. M. L. CASSE FRENCH PASTRY Brioche Croissant 946'/2 Rush Street FURRIERS FURS BY DU CINE Restyle your discarded fur garments into fashionable new capes to wear with un- trimmed suits and coats. DU CINE Importer and Manufacturer Diana Court 540 North Michigan Avenue Superior 9073 FURRIERS--CONTUNUED H. WALZER & CO. Fine Furs Since 1896 A new spring collection of the latest mod els in jackets, scarfs and capes. 2 1 5 N. Michigan Ave. GIFT SHOPS THE TREASURE TROVE Gifts of modern smartness. Many beau tiful and unusual pieces — Pottery — Brass — Glassware. Hand-made articles. Chil dren's novel playthings. Jig-saw puzzles for rent. Italian Leather goods. THE TREASURE TROVE 120 E. Oak St. Superior 9625 HEMSTITCHING Variety in styles of buttons made to your order at the WALTON HEMSTITCHING SHOP. Monogramming, pleating and embroidery. 64 E. Walton Place Superior 1071 INSTRUCTION The Chicago School of Sculpture VIOLA NORMAN, Director Small classes. Individual criticism. Life modeling. Abstract design; life drawing and architectural modeling. Saturday morn ing class for young people. Call Harrison 3216 — Catalogue on request 56 E. Congress St. The Hazel Sharp School of Dancing 25 E. Jackson Blvd. Kimball Bldg. DANCING Wabash 0305 INSTRUCTION— CONTINUED DRESS DESIGN AND STYLING Professional training or programs for Per sonal Use. French method freehand Cut ting — Draping, advanced Sewing projects, Sketching, Color, Ideas, Study of Style Trends, Merchandising. Vogue School of Fashion Art 1 1 6 S. Michigan Blvd. INTERIOR DECORATION Professional training for Business or Per sonal Use — Individual Advancement — Ar rangement, Color, Period and Contem porary Styles, Fabrics, Estimating and Rendering, Styling and Merchandising. Under personal supervision of RUTH WADE RAY Director of Vogue School 1 I 6 S. Michigan Blvd. JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS Makers of hand wrought jewelry, bracelets, pendants, rings, key chains, monogram jewelry, also objets d'art. Ten per cent reduction to Chicagoan readers. THE ART SILVER SHOP . 61 E. Monroe St. THE ART METAL STUDIOS, INC. Suite 1900—17 N. State St. MINERAL WATERS BLOOD PRESSURE Doctors recommend MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER 739 W. Jackson Blvd. Call Monroe 5460 MODERN DECORATION MODERN DECORATIVE ARTS SECESSION, LTD. 1 1 6 E. Oak St. Telephone Whitehall 5733 Harold O. Warner Robert Switzer, Jr. MODISTE RENTAL LIBRARIES MME. ALLA RIPLEY Incorporated H. C. HOWARD Stage Director Offering interesting courses in light opera, voice, drama, radio television, stage danc- Semi-annual clearance sale. Dresses ing, public and social speaking. Under $45. Suits $45-$75. Coats $50-$95. supervision of stage and radio experts. $5.00. 622 Michigan Ave., So. Hats Godair's Bridge Scoring Pads Designed and edited by E. M. Lagron, radio expert. 300 to 1200 piece picture puzzles. Rental library. Play the old-new fireside game — cribbage. JOSEPH J. GODAIR 1 0 East Division Street Delaware 8408 TOYS — GIFTS— NOVELTIES THE DEJA SHOP I 1 04 No. Dearborn St. Unusual toys suitable for boys and girls of any age — gifts that are cleverly hand-made — etchings and oriental prints that are hard to find elsewhere. You are always welcome to look around. An Extensive Lending Library Superior 3571-4955 REFRIGERATION SERVICE All Makes of Electric Refrigerators Repaired, overhauled and maintained. Prompt, efficient service — reasonable rates. REFRIGERATION MAINTENANCE CORP. 365 E. Illinois St. All Phones— Superior 2085 RIDING APPAREL CORRECT RIDING APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES for Park Polo and Hunting Ready to wear and to your order M E U R I S S E 8 So. Michigan Dearborn 3364 RUGS Oriental and Domestic Rugs Cleaned and repaired. Super native work and proper care. Reasonable charges. CHERKEZIAN BROS. Importers of Antique and Modern Oriental Rugs 1 1 7 E. Oak St. Phone Superior 7116 SHOES Custom Made RIDING BOOTS For park — polo — field and hunting AISTON Established London 1778 Chicago Shop So. Michigan Central 4221 THE H. C. HOWARD SCHOOL OF THE THEATER 1 1 1 East Oak Street Superior 1704 OHM SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES 540 N. Michigan Suite : 31— •Diana Court French Italian German Spanish Arcade Building Telephone Harrison 2675 OPTICIAN Call Superior 7100 Ask for a Demonstration Lesson BOLL & LEWIS OPTICAL CO. "Designers of Fine Eyewear" "Where your Oculists' prescription for glasses is filled with scientific accuracy." Special designs for town and travel Suite 1820 8 So. Michigan Blvd. at Madison Telephone State 5710-5711 To Freshen Your Winter Wardrobe select a midseason frock from Frances R. Hale or Mme. Alia Ripley's collection. Alicia Marshall shows hand -knit' ted suits as the preferred all-season costume. SPORTS WEAR ALICIA MARSHALL'S HAND KNITTED SUITS Quality and good taste at the right price 540 N. Michigan Ave. Superior 2799 STATIONERS Cards for announcement of any occasion- designed in our own studio and cannot b< obtained elsewhere. Stationery, unusual printing, etc.. copy prepared. LEONARD STUDIO 47 East Chicago Avenue Delaware 2112 WOMEN'S APPAREL FRANCES R. HALE 1660 E. 55th St. Distinctive Clothes for the Woman and the Miss Mayfair Hotel at Hyde Park Blvd. Fairfax 7910 44 The Chicagoan WORLDLY GOODS For the Bridal Crop A DISTINGUISHED PATTERN IN FLAT WARE: AMERICAN DIRECTOIRE, ROGERS, LUNT fc? BOWLEN. JUST ONE OF THE CLEVER DESIGNS IN HAND FORGED ALUMINUM TRAYS SHOWN BY HIPP AND COBURN. zmw% ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL DESIGN IN ALUMINUM FASHIONED BY THE WENDELL AUGUST FORGE FOR HIPP AND COBURN. THE LACE OF KINGS, A POINT DE VENISE CLOTH FOR HER FORMAL DINNERS. LITWINSKY. A BRIGHT NEW HORS D'OUEVRE TRAY HAS SIX DIVISIONS AND A CHEESE BOARD FOR ITS CENTER, TATMAN; SHAPED LIKE A TINY SNOW SHOVEL IS THE SILVER CHEESE SERVER. THIS, WITH THE GAY SWIZZLE STICK AND ENAMELED FLASK (LADIES' SIZE, MIND YOU) FROM MARSHALL FIELD; THE HUGE HIGHBALL GLASS IS FROM A SET AT MANDEL BROTHERS. EXQUISITELY LACQUERED COM- MODE AND OTHER RARE PIECES FROM MISS GHEEN; GRANT'S ART GALLERIES. February, 1933 45 Do Alterations make inroads on your Budget? Would you like to be able to slip into those new dresses? Some women are able to slip into any "little dress" in a shop, and look as though they had spent hours in being fitted. Are you one of these fortunate people? Or do you have to spend more money and wait days for your clothes, because they require alteration? Proportionate, symmetrical slenderness is attained quickly, pleasantly, healthfully in Elizabeth Arden's Exer cise Department. Exhilarating exercises... gay dancing... the Ardena Bath that banishes weight from the first treat ment... these are sane, direct ways to slenderness. And how about the new hats? Do you feel that you are not equal to their daring pertness? You really can wear them, you know, if your skin is well cared for and if you use the correct make-up properly. Miss Arden's half- hour Debutante Treatment at $2.50, enables you to feel ever so fresh at a most modest expenditure of time and money. Arrange to have one at the end of the day, when you are feeling wilted. You will love it. For an appointment, please telephone Superior 6952. ELIZABETH ARDEN 70 EAST WALTON PLACE • CHICAGO NEW YORK LONDON • PARIS • BERLIN - ROME © Elizabeth Arden, 1933 46 MUSIC HATH FRIENDS A Few Campaign Notes By Robert Pollak WHAT with Harold McCormick whistling on the radio, John Carpenter getting married, and Frederick Stock playing the viola in public for a horde of Elks, Lions, Moose, Eagles and Kiwanians, it has been a very musical month indeed. To be sure local melodic circles were somewhat chagrined by Mrs. Livingston Fairbanks militant statement that we had too many committees around here and not enough Art. But a squad of formidable dowagers rushed into print in the society pages to deny the allegation. Brahms and Beethoven ducked the flying teacups. Mrs. Fairbank retreated to Paris in good order. No one had felt serene enough about the whole matter to explain to Mrs. Fairbank that when the Millionaire Patron of Music disappeared in the cataclysm of 1929 his place was to be taken by scores of committees, serious little groups functioning as desperately in Paris as in Chicago. And, considering that a Temple of Music or a committee never made or marred a great musician, one wonders now why the lady was so perturbed. The Temple of Music itself is proving a very welcome diversion to a select public, sick to death, even as you and I, of emergency relief stations and Huey Long. The laconic maxim that man cannot live by bread alone holds in time of famine as well as in time of feast. Mrs. Fairbank should give us credit for boundless audacity in asking a hundred thousand people to pay for a lake- front pavillion because Mr. Stock dreamed a dream. Most of us Thursday nighters and Friday afternooners would give Mr. Stock anything he asked for. But even he will be pleasantly surprised by the army of obscure visionaries that will part with paper and silver dollars before the books of the Friends are closed. Many of the contributors have never heard of him. Their reasons for buying brick and mortar are not too easy to analyze. Each giver must have a vague notion that makes him obey the impulse. Karleton Hackett and I see ourselves sitting across from a stein of good beer, watching the sunset on the lake, listening to the rhythm of Johann Strauss from a seventy piece orchestra. The thought itself is worth a buck. JM.0ST distinguished January visitor at Orchestra Hall was Serge Prokofieff, the Russian bad boy of music, who appeared three times as conductor-soloist with Stock's forces. He banged his way viciously through his own fifth piano concerto and writhed at the podium in performances of Chout and The Gambler Suite. The violence of Prokofieff is bound to evoke strong likes and dislikes. Yet his significance in the modern scene is such that he cannot be dismissed with a mere yes or no. Coming as an antedote to a Russia fatigued with the subtle opiates of Scriabin and his disciples, he sent a new current of cold, fresh air blowing through modern music. His stagy reversion to classic and severe forms, his square cut meters, his revival of a bounding, brilliant piano technique, his hard mockery, — all these qualities elevated him almost instantly to an eminent position that he has never lost. Like Stravinski he has a weather eye out for what the public wants. In the role of court jester to the twentieth century he has found and kept his followers. Un' fortunately this is almost the only string in his bow. On occasion, as in The Grandmother s Fairy Tales and in parts of his Third Con certo he allows a strain of genuine anguish and tenderness to creep into his music, and he looms, for a moment, as large as Moussorgski But never for long. Buffoon he was, buffoon he continues to be, an overgrown gamin, nervous as a cat unless he can be throwing brick.' through windows. Stock opened the Prokofieff Thursday-Friday pair with Dvorak? Othello Overture and the earnest, refined B flat Symphony ot Chausson, but the Russian welterweight blew all memory of them out the door. Last 1932 orchestra soloists were Philip Manuel and Gavin Williamson, two local boys who live and work in a south- side apartment full of pianos and harpsichords. It has been my con' viction these five years that this team, well known in the concert field outside of Chicago, deserved the accolade of the symphony manage ment. In three appearances with the symphony they have reaffirmed their sympathy and magistral approach toward the harpsichord masterpieces of Mozart, Couperin, Rameau and the Bach family The Chicagoa^ Stock, with his usual graciousness, designed his program to comple ment the clavecin music, setting the soloists among orchestral works of Handel and Rameau and topping off a great concert with his own stunning arrangement of the Bach Passacaglia. It is doubtful whether the supremely beautiful ensemble playing of Williamson and Manuel reached every cranny of Orchestra Hall. The delicate Pleyel instruments, accompanied by small orchestra, are best heard in a smaller place. But it is fortunate that a wider public has come to know and care for the scholarship and virtuosity of these two gentlemen of Chicago. 1 HREE more regular performances at Orchestra Hall. You can see for yourself where most of the musical activity centers these curious days. On January 12-13 the statuesque Jean- nette Vreeland appeared as soloist, singing the climactic Song of the Wood'Dove from Schonberg's GurreLieder. Stock, who proposes to do the entire oratorio some day, sat up many nights before this con cert reducing Schonberg's score, penned for a mammoth orchestra, to fit the local band. I am convinced that this enforced hack-work pre vented him from really understanding this music as he will some day. The Wood-Dove's song is a dramatic epitome of the entire first half of the Schonberg work, not simply a threnody upon the death of Tove, its heroine. The brusque, effective contrasts, the exciting changes in tempo are plainly marked in the text. Stock seemed fatigued enough to take his gait from the soloist rather than from his own perception of the work, and as a result failed to catch its spirit. To make matters worse the lyric line lies badly for Miss Vreeland who, indeed, sang the soprano rather than the alto part when the work was performed in Philadelphia and New York by Stokowski. My own sense of disappointment in a highly anticipated concert was not dissipated by Stock's reading of Bruckner's Third Symphony in D minor. I am told that the Bruckner Society is constantly growing in size, but to my mind it will not change the devout Austrian's posi tion in history. His symphonies have moments of indubitable rich ness and power, but they are jerry-built and creaky in the joints. Nor can it be denied that they weary even his most ardent enthusiasts by their length. January 19, Thursday night and the gallery gods cheer at the con clusion of the concert. Not for any flashy virtuoso but for Stock and a superb projection of the Brahms Second. Our orchestra, surely not a great one, outdid itself for an ecstatic conductor, a reverent and fiery Brahmin. You wouldn't have known the old place. The program built of three symphonies, the Haydn Oxford, the Shostakovitch May Day, and the Brahms was an admirable lesson in symphonic architecture. Shostakovitch, one of the most precocious modern Russians, has yet to reach the stature of Miaskowski, a fellow propagandist. But he owns an uncanny imagination and his experi ments in orchestral sonorities and combinations are, by themselves, fascinating. Curiously enough, his final grandiose apostrophe to the government of Stalin finds him weak and commonplace. Being fundamentally a suspicious fellow I wondered if he found this lip- service distasteful. Thursday night, February 2, Rudolph Reuter introduces a one- movement piano concerto of Bernard Dieter, local associate of the Columbia School. Dieter's music seems to derive from Franck and Reger. He is enamoured, harmonically, of great piled-up clusters of ninth and elevenths. His orchestra is almost deliberately dry and explosive. His composition, not one whit moving, interests us by a certain characteristic austerity that may indicate either a deep-rooted soberness or the pedantry of the musical professor. As Westbrook Pegler so aptly puts it, time alone will tell. A little vegetation has sprung up among the ruins of the Insull empire. The Civic Opera houses a resident light opera company, managed by David Russel, erstwhile Shubert fac totum in St. Louis. Sponsors of the venture have so far presented De Koven's Robin Hood, the Gershwin-Stothart-Hammerstein-Har- bach Song of the Flame and the perennial Desert Song. The DeKoven libretto is even worse than we once thought it, and the Song of the Flame has enough plot to stuff a goose, but the singing of Greek Evans and Charlotte Lansing is better than good, and the orchestra is capable. Gives you a feeling of homesickness to see some of those old Opera sets come out of the warehouse to frame the Lincoln greenmen of Sherwood and the minions of the soviet. This gaga world — The Philharmonic String Quartet, foursome of Symphony members, Weicher, Hancock, • • • cLS one drinker to another- there's nothing finer than CORINNIS SPRING WATER You'll like Corinnis because it's so downright delightful to taste. You'll like it too, because it's al ways crystal-clear, always pure and sparkling. Order a case of Corinnis today. See that everyone in the family drinks from six to eight glasses daily. We need that much water, you know, to keep the body func tioning in a healthy, vigorous manner. Corinnis costs but a few cents a bottle. And it is delivered direct to your door anywhere in Chicago or suburbs. HINCKLEY 420 W. Ontario St. & SCHMITT SUPerior 6543 February, 1933 Enjoy late . . . en Do you like to make a pleasant little social occasion of a cup of fresh-made, fragrant coffee at home, and a dainty midnight snack? You needn't hesitate about serving coffee to your guests, even so late at night. Order a can from your grocer. Try this safe, delicious coffee for two weeks. Your nerves will appreciate the change . . . because it's KAFFEE-HAG COFFEE 48 Wagner and Quick, played Beethoven and Dohnanyi to a crowd that overflowed the handsome foyer of Orchestra Hall. Excellent, some times brilliant, quartet playing, carefully studied and rehearsed. The Philharmonic deserves and owns a public of its own. . . . The Woman's Symphony Orchestra has moved down to one of the main dining rooms of the Drake. Their ambitious third program included a Brandenburg concerto, the Franck Symphony and Die Junge Magd of Hindemith. La Sundstrom's ladies begin to sound like an orchestra. The string section is fine in tone and precise in attack. I suggest and make no charge for it that Donna Parker's ushers be forbidden to guide people to their seats while the music is on. One gentleman tripped over a rug during the Brandenburg Concerto. . . . Iturbi, the Spanish flash who looks a little like Ernie Byfield, gave us four sonatas for piano at Orchestra Hall on February 5. No one can beat him for fleetness and delicacy in the right hand. He is most interesting to me while he wanders through the dainty Ravel Sonatine. Seems like a modern De Pachmann minus the vaudeville. . . . Chaliapin has written autobiographically of opera and the Revo lution in Man and Mas\ (Knopf). You will be surprised how- calculating this great child of the steppes can be in matters of aesth etics. One of the greatest natural talents in the history of the stage, he anticipates every effect, never ceases to study his roles, reads extensively in preparing new ones. You will have a different kind of admiration for him when you put down Man and Mas\. JVax-JVorks HERE is a new wrinkle for the gramophile. Universal Radio Productions, located in the Tower Building, will record any radio program right off the air if you want to add it to your permanent library. The charge is not great and the reproductions arc so faithful that one Chicago collector has solidified all the Metropol itan Opera broadcasts of the Wagnerian music-dramas and added them to his record collection. Victor's most successful Musical Masterpiece of the month is the Elgar B Minor Violin Concerto, done by the London Symphony with the composer (he must be getting on) at the dais and Master Yehudi Menuhin as soloist. Menuhin, a Persinger prodigy, is a mature artist in short trousers. He approaches the Elgar soberly and his fiddling is devoid of callow acrobatics. He interprets the concerto in a large manner, understanding its leisurely serenity and tenderness. A necessity for explorers in the literature of the violin. Also bound in album is the Victor pressing of the unfamiliar Polish Symphony of Tschaikowsky . The orchestra is the London Symphony and the conductor Coates, who charges brilliantly through this obvious score. The Third has its many tawdry moments and at least one inanely long coda, but its themes are often as interesting as those in the more famous Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Symphonies. Also from Coates and Victor comes a charming doubling of the Cortege from Rimsky's opera-ballet Mlada and the Gopa\ from Moussorgsky's Fair at Sorotchins\. The Cortege, from a fairy ballet, is a Russian sweetmeat, brightly colored as to orchestration and as ingenuous as a nursery legend. The fierce Gopak is one of the most stirring episodes in Moussorgsky's light opera. The recording is splendid. Grace Moore makes two from the current revival of Millocker's Dubarry, I Give My Heart and The Dubarry, the latter boasting that priceless adaptation, "we bend the knee to Dubarry." The music has a pleasant nineteenth century operetta flavor, and Grace Moore sings it smartly . Lawrence Tibbett, lately in the public eye in The Emperor Jones, brings that great baritone voice to a pair of hits from Music in the Air. The gentleman is obviously becoming the American Chaliapin, and his is always a stirring voice, but he doesn't get Mr. Kern. Tibbett attacks The Song Is You and And Love Was Born as if they were ballads by Oley Speaks. He forgets Kern's rythmics and rubato, the lilt that always distinguishes the American's songs. Brunswick studios are doing a land-office business on Ethel Mer man's epicene interpretation of Eadie Was a Lady, lineal and justly notorious descendant of Minnie the Moocher and other wails. Eadie, celebrated in the DeSylva-Henderson-Brown Ta\e a Chance, a revue still thriving in New York, is the life-story of a gay gal, and "though her life was merry, she had savoir faire." I'll leave it to you to find out how the rest of it goes. R. P. The Chicagoan NORTH MICHIGAN AND OAK PARK Ben Hecht Goes Dickens By Susan Wilbur NATURALLY the first thing to be said about Marion Strobel's new novel, Silvias in Town, is that it deals with the far past. Not to mince matters, with the year 1930. With that ancient era when technocracy had not as yet been heard of. For example, if Llewellyn Jones had happened in at any of the larger occasions where the sensational Silvia showed up, say the Thanksgiving eggnog party, and had mentioned a curious young man named Howard Scott, whom he had met in Greenwich Village, Miss Strobel herself would have attempted to switch him onto one of his better stories. And secondly, that Silvias in Town, is, as any third book by an author worth watching should be, the best of the three both as obser vation and as workmanship. If the pattern had been drawn on the late Henry Kitchell Webster's famous blackboard, the plot could not be more satisfactorily articulated. Something that might hardly have been said about Saturday Afternoon. As to characters, the author not only knows them as intimately as she might know her own circle, but exhibits them as enticingly as a model might show a dress. Nor do you have to take the author's word for Silvia: Silvia makes the reader sit up and take notice just as the mention of her being in town made a whole dull supper party sit up and take notice. Even the young man who hadn't said a word proceeded to say a complete mouthful. As to background, it is the most meticulously Chicago of the three. Except that in a way it isn't necessarily Chicago at all. That is, in spite of its trappings of Orchestra Hall, Winnetka, Saddle and Cycle, Lake Shore Drive, and North Michigan, it is based on so true a conflict that it might almost be transposed to some other city, just as a song may be transposed to another key. The point of the tale being that Silvia, a widow of something less than a year, discovers herself in love with someone whom her six-year-old daughter considers "the horridest man." Like the other two, Silvia is, in addition, a novel that might almost be read exclusively for its fine points. Here is an author who can really tell about a party, or the plans for one, can make the day by day relationship of a mother and child persuasive, and raise the rival ries of a school meeting to drama. What a satisfactory villain Eliza is, in the old fashioned sense of the term villain. To the progress of the story she is pure obstacle. And yet she might be straight from a psychiatric case book. While Stanley, the hero, has quite evidently read Arnold Bennett on schedule. Silvia is so careful not to let him fall in love with her and thereby upset the schedule that lo and behold he does. And personally I have always liked Miss Stro bel's way of putting something funny into her love scenes. This time it is what you might call the athletic note. INot three blocks from where Ernest Heming way must in his youth quite frequently have bothered the patient librarians, or gone to church, if he did go to church, stands a house with that square top which was apparently the very latest fashion when Oak Park was very, very young. In this house a mystery recently showed signs of developing. The maid began to be afraid to be left alone of an evening. On nights when everybody was there, she insisted that the collie sleep somewhere near her door. Unfor tunately for Mignon Eberhart, present chatelaine of the house, the mystery turned out to have already been written. It was, in other words, The White Coc\atoo. A book which would make anyone look twice before embarking on a dark corridor late at night, not to mention mobilizing all available dogs. Although but an amateur mys tery story reader myself, I feel quite safe in saying that this is the most intricate, most satisfying, most blood-curdling tangle ever put into print. Furthermore the reason I feel safe in saying so is nothing so credulous as that Mrs. Eberhart's three mysteries have all been Crime Club selections and won other prizes besides. No, it is a much more conclusive reason than that. You see, back in the old days when D. E. Hobelman, former mystery expert for the former Post, used to say a mystery was no good, he would always give the rea sons. In consequence, from knowing what dozens of other mysteries have lacked, I am, conversely, aware that in this mystery of a ram- AT EVERY IMPORTANT DANCE THIS YEAR THESE J\few and Qorreft ) EVENING CLOTHES j and ACCESSORIES < ARE IN EVIDENCE ) The new Dress Coat style pictured above, j like all of our fine clothes, was developed for us j by Walter Morton, recognized leading tailors \ of garments ready-to-wear. $83.00. S New styles in distinctive and comfortable ) shirts for evening wear are available at ftj.jO ) and $4.30. \ Waistcoats, including the comfortable Backless ) Waistcoat, are priced st $10.00. J Silk and Opera Hats, in correct proportions J for individual requirements, $15.00. ) The new and correct styles in Dress Collars, S Ties, Jewelry and other accessories Jor \ evening wear, are featured at \ all times at sensible prices. ( M \S/~t fUr'^ 1><^^ LONDON I MA^rll -^^^z' DETROIT ^^*^ / 1^^^ CHICAGO / " LTD. MINNEAPOLIS OUTFITTERS TO GENTLEMEN 100 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE February, 1933 Book NOW! MAIDEN VOYAGE SANTA ELENA MARCH • • • 31 The ideal time to visit HAVANA COLOMBIA • PANAMA • EL SALVADOR GUATEMALA and MEXICO en route te globus VICTORIA, B. C, and SEATTLE, WASH. Meet Spring a month ahead of time! Sail to sunny California with the hrilliant new Santa Elena on her gay maiden voyage, March 31! Just 16 days, New York to California. Only Grace Line offers opportunity en route to go ashore every second or third day and explore the glamorously lovely Spanish Amer icas. Only Grace Line provides a fleet of four magnificent new sister liners to carry you — first American ships having all outside staterooms with pri vate baths. Controlled ventilation and temperature. Palm Court. Club and smart Orchestra. Largest outdoor pool on any American ship. Fares as low as $225 First Class with private bath. No passports. Complete rail-water cruise-tour 'Round America costs as little as $325 ($235 on Cabin Liners) — including rail from your home to either coast, Grace Line to the oppo site coast and return home again by rail. Chicago : 230 N. Michigan Avenue; New York : 10 Hanover Square; San Fran cisco: 2 Pine Street; Los Angeles: 525 West Sixth St.; Boston: Little Build ing; also Philadelphia, Seattle, Victoria. Should you prefer to sail earlier than March 31st, book for the new Santa Rosa, March 17 from New York. In either case, consult your travel agent or Grace Line NOW! K^J\liLjri OjfixjT O ." For even thriftier travel, sail on one of the popular Grace Cabin Class liners which leave fortnightly. Fares as low as $135, full outside accommodations. GRACE LINE c 5 10 Hanover Sq., N. Y., or 2 Pine St., San Francisco Gentlemen: Please send me full information about your new liners, sailing dates and itinerary. Addr City- -Stats bling French provincial hotel in the windy season everything that should be in a mystery answers present with bells on. JDack in those times when days were longer, and columns longer, and there were eight pages to be filled of a Fri- day, and I still felt that to be conscientious one must keep up with the two thousand books a year that are published in France, along with the five thousand that are published in America, I used some' times to review translations by calling attention to what had been left out. Now of course it is too bad that The Great Magoo was taken off Broadway before a Chicago company got started. But at the same time, to read it instead of seeing it, is to be in the advan tageous position of those who used to take my advice and look up original French versions. In other words, The Great Magoo, as printed, is one of those real unexpurgated editions for which both Mr. Hecht and his publisher were justly famous in their Chicago days. Furthermore, here are the stage sets, in color, and here are the stage directions, expanded to show just what the authors thought of their characters. However, if Mr. Hecht goes on studying Coney Island exhibitors, flag pole sitters, and flea circus managers in just this way, he will no doubt come to the bad end of being compared to Dickens. That is, when they are through comparing him to Zola and Balzac. In choosing prisons for the theme of his new novel, Ann Vic\ers, Sinclair Lewis has tackled something knottier than his semi-namesake Upton Sinclair ever tilted with even at his tiltiest. In theory the problem is complex enough. What shall we aim for? Punishment, or reform — since it seems that punishment does not lead to reform as it used to be supposed to do. In Knut Hamsum's Growth of the Soil there is a prison sentence that worked like a four years college course. But in real life if a prison head tries to do anything decent for anybody, the newspapers say he is running a private club for malefactors. And it is a problem that ramifies as you attack it: for example, many people outside prisons have infringed statutes, while many inside have not: Ann Vickers, famous head of a famous reformatory, was herself once in prison on account of a suffrage meeting. Not to mention all the things that psychoanalysts have to say on the subject of prisons. Mr. Lewis wisely concentrates his attack on the horrors of the prisons them selves, at their best and at their worst. What prison does to prisoners. what it does to their jailers. He has thus produced a document which will be more powerful for immediate modification than if it went out for theory or suggested a program. Ann Vic\ers is a book to arouse universal attention, horror, discussion. But there is another side to the book, a side for which Mr. Lewis thanks Dorothy Thompson while dedicating the book to her. For here is a full length of the modern woman, college vintage of 1912, a woman who instinctively began being modern just this side of the cradle, was not so much popular as important in college, stood in line for the presidency of Christian Association, and thought secretly that if she did decide to be a missionary, she would at least get the trip to China. And who, also from just this side the cradle, was all the time very much a woman down inside her somewhat mascu line manifestations of energy and drive. Nowadays it is the normal thing to eat one's cake and have it, whatever that means, but in reading of Ann one can't help wondering if there wasn't something to be said for frustration as encountered in single-minded 1912. Try to imagine someone asking you if you have read any good books lately, and yourself attempting to reply: Why yes, The Bulpington of Blup. If you get past the title to the first page, needless to say you go on, as you do with any H. G. Wells. You also discover that The Bulpington of Blup is the correct title: there could be no other. Theodore Bulpington was the poor kid's name and he lived in Blay port, Blup for short. And as his father had retired to the seaside to write a history of the Vaangians, and as his mother was so well educated as to behave in a manner from which a small son would naturally develop escape mechanisms, why there you have it . The Bulpington of Blup, and his dream-life of derring-do. When this son of the literary nineties meets up with two scions of the scientific nineties, you still think of him humanly, and perhaps go on so think ing, even while he somewhat categorically meets Fabian socialism, sacred and profane love, the problem of death. But by the time Theodore gets mixed up in the war, you begin to realize that you 50 The Chicagoan were right when the title warned you. No, this is not a simple tale of a simple youth. It is a satire. And if the arty element that stems from the nineties shall indeed go down under science, mechanics, technocracy, Mr. Wells does not intend that The Bulpington of Blup shall cause you to exaggerate your natural regrets. OMOKERS who specialize will tell you that the only decent Virginia is that which is cured in England. There is also, quite often, a desirable aroma to British cured American biog raphy. Lord Charnwood's Lincoln for example. Not to mention David Garnett's Pocahontas. Do not expect from this any such tricky book as Lady Into Fox. Though, analytically speaking, this too has that quality of taking an exceptional situation and then read ing it from inside. For example, Mr. Garnett sees the outdoor life of the Indians as clean and agreeable, takes Powhatan as a digni fied man, and a humorist, and then quite calmly adds torture as an Indian's idea of a quiet evening's entertainment. Furthermore, you somehow feel as though you had for the first time heard the truth about Pocahontas's feeling toward John Smith and John Rolfe. And yet that which is truly fascinating about the book is neither Indian life, nor yet the soul of Pocahontas, but the details of the visit which she, a princess, pays to London, in company with her husband, a commoner. I he Journal of Arnold Bennett has now reached the second of its prospective three volumes: 1911-1920. It has already taken its place beside the Notebooks of Tchekoff in the arsenal of the professional writer. Three authors were discussing it the other evening. One, a woman, and rather lazy, was saying that she had decided to ration the second volume: that she had found there was enough drive in five pages to see her through a short story. The second author said: But how will you manage to stop at the five pages? Why, I kept at it for the better part of a week and couldn't do anything else until I had finished it. While the third said: The reason it bucks me up is this: Bennett is always making notes about things that happen in tram cars and so on, the way I do, and then never using them the way I don't. Highlights and Smudges Notes on the Galleries and Exhibits By Edward Millman THE thirty-seventh annual exhibition by artists of Chicago and vicinity is on at the Art Institute. As one enters the east wing he is greeted by the Raoul Josset-Mathilde Schaefer fountain piece, a bronze figure colossal in size, but an antithesis in aesthetic quality. Its synthetic radiator finish harmonizes beautifully with its cheap romanticism. Beginning with the "pretty" position of the arm above the head down to rolling tons of ugly "sweet" forms, on to badly organized masses that are supposed to represent flowing drapery; it is utter decadence in sculpture. This bronze symbolizes the quality of the entire show. The abundance of dull and uninter esting painting and sculpture is appalling — room after room of inane, sentimental, sometimes well painted, but usually badly painted canvases. The same type landscape, portrait and still life that we see year after year of both the modern and academic schools are thrown together and are supposed to represent the creative work of the artists of Chicago. This year the Art Institute inaugurated a double jury system for the painting section composed of "conservatives" and "moderns," the artists having the privilege of choosing either jury to pass on his work. We commend the Art Institute for their hopeful experiment to be fair to all schools of painting. But a jury system of one type or another will not help. It lies much deeper than that. We wonder if the exhibiting artists are capable of much better. Perhaps we are setting too high a table of standards for our local art. But why measure art by any other standards, and if we must, why call it art? 1 he prize awards for the show are as follows: The Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan medal and purchase prize of $750 to Francis Chapin for Pin\ House. The Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan prize of $500 to Laura van Pappelendom for Long Haired Cactus. HOT springs UATHS ARKANSAS ENOOKSED BY THE THREE 18-HOLE COURSES GRASS GREENS FOREST BRIDLE PATHS ? EXCURSION FARES Hot Springs is reached on through sleepers via the Missouri Pacific and Rock Island Railways ... by paved motor highways . . . and by air. ENDORSED BY THE UNITED STATES GOV ERNMENT WHICH OWNS & CONTROLS THE HOT WATERS. -k The U. S. Government is com pleting its magnificent new Army and Navy Hospital at Hot Springs, costing $1,500,000... displacing the old hospital, in constant service since 1884. * By this impressive endorse ment, our National Government shows its own faith in the heal ing power of Hot Springs' Ther mal Waters . . . and, by the same token, recommends them to every man and woman for re lief from rheumatism, neuritis, high blood pressure, etc. . . . and for reconditioning. * The ARLINGTON HOTEL AND BATHS offer you the benefit of these curative waters in its own splendid Bath House operated within the hotel, by licensed attendants, under the super vision of the U. S. Government. SPECIAL RATES •k We are now offering excep tionally attractive rates for the same accommodations and cui sine that have made The Arling ton one of the South's most popular resort hotels, and invite you to come for a low cost vaca tion of physical benefit and en joyable recreation. May we send you our schedule of rates and illustrated booklet? ADDRESS W. E. CHESTER GENERAL MANAGER THE ARLINGTON HOTEL & BATHS HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, ARKANSAS Hot Springs Go If & Country Club. 54 Holes of Championship Golf. Grass Greens and Tees The HR LING TON February, 1933 51 CO <! O u o IRWIN A Name Found on Fine Furniture If you would see beautiful furniture under the most appro priate conditions — where you have ample opportunity for discriminating selection and comparison — see the display at the Irwin factory wholesale showrooms at 608 S. Mich igan Blvd. — a wide assortment of reproductions, adapta tions and original conceptions by America's foremost designing staff. . . . Purchases may be arranged through your dealer. ROBERT W. IRWIN CO. COOPER -WILLIAMS, Inc. Affiliated The Largest and Most Brilliant Display oj Fine Custom Furniture in the Middle West The CHICAGOAN Theatre Ticket Service Kindly enter my order for theatre tickets as follows: (Play). (Second choice) (Number of seats). (Date) (Name) (Address). (Telephone) (Enclosed) S Attend the Theatre Regularly, Comfortably, Smartly By arrangement with the the atres listed below, THE CHI CAGOAN is pleased to assure its readers choice reservations at box office prices and with a minimum of inconvenience. Adelphi Great Northern Apollo Harris Blackstone Majestic Cort Playhouse Erlanger Princess Grand Selwyn Studebaker The Mr. and Mrs. Jule F. Brower prize of $300 to Jean Crawford Adams for Winter With Flowers. The William Randolph Hearst prize of $300 to Olga Chassaing for Portrait. The William and Bertha Clusmann prize of $200 to Jan Fabion for Crucifixion. The Joseph N. Eisendrath prize of $200 awarded to Boris Gilbert- son for Philosopher. The Harry A. Frank prize of $150 to Constantine Pougialis for Two Girls. The Clyde M. Carr prize of $100 to Aaron Bohrod for Street. The Chicago Woman's Aid prize of $100 to Louise Pain for Stone Figure. The Chicago Woman's Club prize of $100 to Rifka Angel for Circus Scene. The Municipal Art League prize of $100 for portraiture to Karl A. Buehr for Portrait of Arthur Cummings, Jr. The Robert Rice Jenkins Memorial prize of $50 to Robert Joy Wolf for Portrait of a Young Girl. The Gold Medal of the Association of Chicago Painters and Sculptors to Albin Polasek for Portrait Bust of Percy B. Eckhart. /\ new gallery has been opened on the eighth floor of the Fair Store for the purpose of exhibiting oil paintings, sculpture, wood carvings, ship models and photographs. The greater part of the floor will be devoted to the exhibiting artists, showing their works on easels provided for by the store. This exhibit will be carried on during the spring and summer months for the benefit of both the Chicago Artists and visitors to the Century of Progress Exposition. Among the artists exhibiting are Aaron Bohrod, A. Raymond Katz, A. L. Pollock, N. P. Steinberg, to name but a few. The exhibit is under the personal direction of Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Jr. The Arts Club has an interesting lineup for the coming months. The current show is composed of a memorial exhibition of Gardner Hale's work, a former Chicagoan who was killed in an automobile accident in California in 1931. Also the work of Henry Billings identified to an extent with the Surrealistes school of painting. The Billings exhibit comes from the Marie Harriman Galleries, and the Hale exhibit from the Knoedler Galleries, both of New York City. There are two other exhibits of importance. One is the first com prehensive show for Chicago of paintings by the German expression ist George Grosz, now in America and teaching at the Art Students League in New York. The second will be an exhibit by the New Artists of Soviet Russia of oil paintings, water colors, drawings and etchings. John Sloan is showing a group of etchings of Greenwich Village at the O'Brien Galleries. Sloan, long identified with the "modernists" in New York, is a tradition in himself, belonging to the old vanguard of painters who fought for the "independent" movement in art. Con sidered a radical in his younger days, he has become more or less the "Grand Old Man" in art circles today, with a host of talented artists for his former students. A Sloan painting, etching or drawing is always interesting, if not for its aesthetic quality, then for its humor or historical quality, historical in the sense of New York City in the last decade. His show at O'Brien's should be seen. THE TIMES AND THE FAIR A Convert Submits his Report (Begin on page 27) theory of taking all the time he has to make a decision — no more and no less. At this writing, the Fair's exhibit space is 75% sold: $5,500,000 worth of space has been sold, and of the money due from exhibitors and concessionaires, 84% has been received; all bills are paid by the Fair within 24 hours of their arrival at the Administration Building; the present status of construction would enable the exposition to open its doors on May 15; there is more than $1,000,000 — cash — in the bank, enough money to pay all expenses through May 31. Let the skeptics lend their ear: a national panic could not keep A Century of Progress from opening on June 1. But after it has opened (the skeptics counter) , who will come to see it? Will a distressed and distracted nation jump into it? 52 The Chicagoan €W^1S..« CARICATURIST CORNELIUS SAMPSON EPITOMIZES, LAMPOONS AND PRAISES THE FLEET FOOTED EDDIE CANTOR IN HIS HILARIOUS CINEMA production of ziegfeld's The Kid From Spain. automobiles or onto the trains and go to Chicago to spend its money? The skeptics are skeptical. But 1893 was a depression year —"never before," writes historian Albert Bushnell Hart, "were the evils of unemployment so widespread in the United States." And twenty-eight million people came to the World's Columbian Exposition. If the entire attendance at Chicago's first world's fair had come from the Chicago area, every man, woman and child in the city would have attended from twelve to fifteen times. On the same basis, every man, woman and child in San Francisco went to the 1915 fair thirty different times. Today travel is easier, and the World's Fair of 1933 will draw people from far places that never heard of the Fair of '93. If every man, woman and child in the Chicago area attends A Cen tury of Progress fifteen times — employing the computation used above — more than fifty million people will pay their fifty cents on the lake front. This figure of fifty million (the Fair's esti mate is forty-five million) does not mean, mind you, fifty million individuals, as it is frequently interpreted by the skep tical; it means fifty million paid admissions. As to the number of individuals who will attend, at least three-fourths of the metropolitan area's 3,500,000 can be counted on, and, coming by automobile, railroad, bus, and airplane, from five to ten million strangers. Conventions alone scheduled for Chicago next summer will bring more than one million strangers inside our gates. That somewhere between 7,500,000 and 10,000,000 individuals will pay 45,000,000 fifty-cent pieces to see A Century of Progress is not — to anyone who has studied the if's and the hut's with all possible impartiality — a visionary figure. I he Chicago Association of Commerce believes that every person who comes to Chicago to see the Fair will spend fifty dollars. Let us be cautious here to the extreme and knock that fifty dollars down to twenty. If five million individuals come to Chicago this summer and spend twenty dollars apiece, the city will have one hundred million dollars of fresh capital dumped into it. This fresh capital will permeate every industry, every profession, every neighborhood grocery store. And the city's investment in this proposition is exactly what? Faith — nothing more. It is not easy to recall a financial scheme, real or phony, in which the people have been more truly said to have every thing to gain and nothing to lose. The Dawes', Lohrs, Hurleys, February, 1933 53 Glorious Tone Perfect Convenience Lazy-X PHILCO End Table Radio with Remote Control flat cord, connecting radio _. * and speaker, under rug. Twin Speakers in Inclined See Lazy-X demonstrated. Sounding Board Cabinet Shadow Tuning Automatic Volume Control COMMONWEALTH EDISON ELECTRIC SHOPS 72 W. Adams Street and Branches 407 South Dearborn street Chicago, Illinois GENTLEMEN: Kindly send my copy of THE CHICAGOAN to the address given below during the months of (Signature) ("Njew address) (Old address)... Petersons and the rest of them have presented to the people the best of all world's fairs, and this is their valedictory: "Here it is. Make it with your faith or break it with your skepticism. Win or lose, as you will." So now I know how they can put on a world's fair in times like these; now I can go back to Selma, Alabama, (if they'll have me) , and tell Uncle Max a thing or two, or three. But what is of more importance to me is that I have made my cold, cautious inspection, and I am a changed man. I have thrown away my hammer, which I love dearly, and I have got me a trumpet. The devil take independent journalism! I am a World's Fair booster. I have come out of the darkness and into the sun. I have left behind my companions in the cult of despair. I have been to the lake front and I have seen men taking the bull of the depression by the horns. I have seen them bringing a flower to bloom where none thought a flower could grow. I have seen them doing the impossible. THE OLD, OLD ORIENT Discloses Some Bright New Charms {Continued from page 41) at Kyoto, and the Fujiya at Miyanoshita, are really hotels with Japanese exteriors and American comforts, boasting ball rooms, open air swimming pools, tennis courts, golf courses, and the like. The Japanese people understand English pretty generally, even more generally than the French, for instance, so that travelers need have no qualms about setting forth to explore even the remote corners of one of the most delightful spots on the Seven Seas. Here and There VX7HATEVER we may feel about Hitler and reparations and the like we all admit quite freely that Deutschland is ueber alles in the world of music. No political struggles or depression can swerve the Germans from one of their deepest loves, and they have already prepared an ambitious program for 1933, which marks the fiftieth anniversary of Wagner's death and the centenary of Brahms1 birth. Frau Winifred Wagner, the new mistress of Bayreuth, is present ing all four parts of the Ring, Die Meister singer , and other Wagner operas during July and August. Toscanini will conduct Parsifal; and new decorations, new costumes and a modern lighting system are all ready for a gala production. Everywhere in Germany it is going to be a Brahms and Wagner year. At the traditional Munich Wagner-Mozart festival all Wagner's works from Rienzi to Parsifal will be given; in Dresden Richard Strauss is conducting Tristan und Isolde; Bruno Walter con' ducts the Brahms Festival concerts in Leipzig; and in Berlin the Singa\ademie is holding a Brahms festival in May, producing the master's great choral works. These are only a few of the many notes THE GAY POOL OF THE MIAMI BILTMORE. 54 The Chicagoan MIAMI BILTMORE AND COUNTRY CLUB COURSE. that will be struck in a great harmony that will make Germany a seventh heaven for music lovers during 1933. C>ities whose names read like an Arabian Night's fantasy — a panorama of travel new to New World eyes — is the next Turkestan tour planned by Intourist. Starting from Moscow April 10th, the de luxe express with international sleeping cars will carry travelers east and south across the broad Russian countryside down into mystic Turkestan, along the ancient caravan trails that once carried the hordes of Genghis Khan and Tamerlane into the heart of Europe. Sightseeing begins in Moscow, capital of the Soviet Union, with the historic Kremlin, Red Square, St. Basil's Cathedral, the Chinese Wall. From Moscow the tour speeds past collective farms and new factories into the old Volga city of Samara. Then past the Aral Sea to Tashkent, Ferghana, Margelan, Samarkand. To Bokhara, of the exquisite rugs; across the Oxus River, which Alexander the Great crossed with his army; to the ruins of Merv, cradle of the human race, and on to Ashkhabad, the city of roses; a steamer across the Caspian Sea to Baku, center of Soviet oil industry, sixteen colorful, swiftly changing days. Arrangements may be made from here to speed north to Moscow in time for May Day celebrations, or to cross the Caucasus by rail, and cruise the Black Sea Riviera. 1 here's never a law of God or man runs north of '53," is the one thing that isn't true about Alaska any more. Our far northern territory is thoroughly tamed now but it is just as beauti ful and exciting as it was in the days of the gold rush. There is no sea voyage quite so amazing and beautiful as the Inside Passage cruise along the coast of British Columbia and Alaska. Glaciers, the living, crashing, roaring kind, are contrasted with thousands of spring flowers; totem poles and old mining settlements; modern buildings and settled cities against unexplored mountains — all vivid shifts of scene from one extreme to the other. Several Chicagoans are making arrangements with the group known as Alaska Guides, for the Alaskan hunting season which devotees swear is something to go back for, year after year. The more effete traveler will go in luxury on the special American Express or Canadian Pacific tours. But either way is exciting and should not be missed if you are bound in a northwesterly direction this spring or summer. DILATORY DIARY In the Election-Inauguration Interlude (Begin on page 23) to Christopher Morley he probably is. Any way, I am all for him. He has made mistakes. Plenty. Who hasn't? He was just a little unluckier than Al Smith. A few million votes unluckier. Tuesday, December 6th. Congress again. This time to hear President's speech. Hunger paraders still much in evidence on Capitol Hill. Their efforts proved A Classic in Musical Instruments TN the fore of fine musical instruments ¦*¦ stands the new Capehart — a classic of luxurious cabinetry ana a masterpiece of home entertainment. No matter what music you prefer, with. Capehart you can have a command performance of the best music the world provides on records or radio. Plan to visit our new Capehart Salon for a demonstration soon. Are you in the Capehart "Who's Who"? Call or write for a copy of the "Pride of Possession" brochure in which appears a par tial list of prominent Americans who own the exclusive Capehart. LYO N £? H E ALY Wabash Avenue at Jackson Boulevard OAK PARK EVANSTON MADAME ELISE Skin Specialist serves the ' 'pa rticu lar woman" Every woman appreciates the value of scientific rejuvenant facials. All original formulae for cream rich in balsam and oils are used in these skillful treatments. Skin care at home is carefully prescribed. European hair tinting, experi ence in all matters of Beauty Culture. TTUaimtSy 59 E. MADISON ST. STATE 5537 ROOM 212 MALLERS BUILDING DEARBORN 1399 February, 1933 55 A cultured hotel-home where families — as well as men or women who live alone — find an atmosphere that bespeaks true refinement. Not only the apartments — but every single room is truly individual — arranged) to reflect your personality, to meet your specific tastes and requirements with the co-operation of a renowned interior architect and decorator. Hotel Pearson — with its atmosphere of culture and refinement and its distinguished clientele — offers not only these new and delightful features — but offers them with rentals that make living here economical as well as highly desirable. HOTEL PEARSON 407 South Dearborn street, Chicago, Illinois One year $3 Two years $5 Gentlemen : I enclose the indicated amount, for which please mail The Chicagoan each month to the address given below. (Signature) (Street address) (City) (State) to be newspaper copy more than anything else. This country no material for Communism. Yet I wish it would pay more attention to whom it sends to Congress. They are the power, these boys, and look at them. Lolling in chairs, talking, moving about, some with feet on desks, all entirely inattentive. They are supposed to be listening to the speech of The President of the United States. Shall never bring my son to watch this discouraging part of our govern ment in action. The sight kills all patriotism. John Sharp Williams was hundred per cent right when he rose to his feet in the Senate chamber and cried: 'I'd rather be a hound dog baying at the moon from my Mississippi plantation than any longer a member of this futile body." Hound dogs on Mississippi plantations at least remain faithful to hand that feeds them. No chance for these lame duckers, the halt and the blind, to balance any budget, help any farmer, or even get us good cold beer. They are merely gestures, Victorian gestures. Wish someone would demand that Huey Long's brother tell more about where Huey's quickly-made money came from, and how much money he has. He's the wealthiest man in the Senate, you hear, except Couzens. "Soak the Rich." Where are the rich? Mostly vanished with the last age. Friday, December 9th. T^ew Tor\. Restless magnificence. Something that civilization has never tried before and never can again. It really isn't America. Chicago is America. And as Isabel Paterson might describe it, Chicago em bodies the covered wagon and the future — all within itself. Grand — Chicago. Unreal — New York, but I like what it does to you. It gives you ideas. Especially when you can watch Stuart Chase lunching with your own editor and know that there within one man's brain might be found the utter annihilation of all technocracy. It was a nice restaurant, just across the street from formidable Macmil- lan's. After lunch we hear that Knopf neglected to sign long contract with Charles Morgan. So, though The Fountain was theirs, the next novel will be Macmillan's. The latter have Phyllis Bentley, too. No wonder they can take chance on me. (Arnold Bennett might have added here that though he had only written two books he would be good for three hundred thousand words per year from now on.) The Colony for dinner. Clothes, jewels, marvelous cuisine, waiters with style. Everyone looking at everyone else. Everyone wanting to be looked at. Constance Bennett, Gary Cooper, Norma Shearer, and others enter. All heads turn. Hollywood reigns supreme. Or is it power of publicity and incomes that are still being paid? "Why is not New York the real America?" asks Bennett in 1911. "Is it more material than, say, Paris or Hamburg, or London? What's up with it, anyhow?" On to Dinner at Eight. Seven scenes of laughs. Kaufman and Ferber are collaborators who know their hardboiled wives, society hostesses, kitchen amours. Thursday, December 15th. The Plantation. Sunshine and peace. In the deep South that brews conflicting emotions. William Faulkner sees it in the way of violence, Stark Young in beauty, Marc Connelly as great drama; but the South doesn't mind any more. It used to say that Connelly didn't know negro dialogue. That Faulkner was mad . But today it cares only to hold on to its land, its mules, and not to hold on quite so long to its cotton. On the first day home they, the cotton planters, ask: "Do you all in the No'th think Congress can do anything?" Friday, December 16th. The news is out. France did not pay. But Claudel, the dean of the Corps, perhaps more surprised at his country than was the rest of the world, led the line, wearing his best diplomatic smile. Tuesday, January 24th. The Twentieth Amendment becomes today a part of the Constitu tion. I saw the last lame ducks. Better still, technocracy has not only been debunked but thrown out of Columbia. Constructive efforts are beginning to materialize at last. Friday, January 27th. Drew Pearson has exonerated himself by an excellent article in Harper's. Wednesday, February 1st. Arnold Bennett started something I don't propose to finish. 56 The Chicagoan GOTHAM GOSSIP Urban and Inter- Urban Items By Frederick Anderson ' I ''HE "depression" has done one thing that's sort of interesting and that is to start colonies of "bankrupts" around the edges of town. One is near Syosset out east of town and another is at Lake Hopat- cong over in Jersey. As Syosset a dozen or so fellows and their families have rented houses at about $35. per mo. and they have no telephones or electricity and the men come to town every day to go through the motions of work, but they haven't got any so they don't do much, but in the meantime they are out of reach of their creditors whose number is "legion." The fellow there who was telling me about it has 10 judgments against him with more coming in every week. He has been a well known newspaper and publicity man and you'd know his name if I told it but of course that wouldn't be "cricket." All these fellows were making 15 thousand a year up in the dear dead days but they say this kind of life is more fun and certainly more exciting with dodging process servers and all. The colony in Jersey has been having quite some excitement lately because the mothers, who of course haven't servants, have to walk their children about two miles to school through the woods and lately they have found bear tracks along the way because it's pretty wild mountain country so the mothers have been making the trip to school with guns over their shoulders, which seems to show that even the wives of former Wall Street customers men still have the pioneer spirit. Speaking of colonies, your correspondent stumbled on one the other day which would make an anthropologist's mustache curl at the ends. Back of Hillburn, near Suffern, which is about 30 miles north west of town, is a settlement of folks called Jackson Whites. They're a cross-breed between American Indians and negros and some Hessians who deserted the British Army during the Revolutionary War. Those that aren't albinos are light colored folks with blue eyes and very high cheek bones. There are about 200 or 300 of them and they live by working in the factories near there and doing odd jobs for Suffern folks. The main road to Tuxedo goes right close to their ramshackle settlement but no one knows it's there and the funny thing is that hardly no New Yorkers have ever heard of them. They're such a mixture of races now it seems kind of a pity there hasn't been a little Chinese blood thrown in just for good measure. Well sir, your correspondent has just written a book and it seems too bad not to tell about it because it's a good one. It's on how to make sauces and it's a funny thing but as much as this great country of ours is turning epicure there has only been one book published about sauces and that was fifteen years ago and it's out of print. So your correspondent collected recipes for pretty near all the important sauces and tested them and put them in a book and the book has been published by Haldeman-Julius, the Little Blue Book man in Girard, Kansas. It sells for 5c and it's called "Fifty Famous Sauces" (adv.). The rising young actress, Kay Wilson, has turned a trick that is sure something to wire home about. She's been playing the part of Isla Crane in Edgar Wallace's play, Criminal At Large, and awhile hack Alexandra Carlisle, the Chicago girl who played Lady Lebanon, the lead, was suddenly taken sick and had no understudy and Kay had just three hours to get up her part for the evening performance which she went through without a prompting. The funny thing was that she doubled in screams, which she would shriek offstage as Isla Crane, and then walk on as Lady Lebanon, because I guess there isn't anyone else in town who can curdle your blood with a scream like Kay, which is just as well for your correspondent's nerves. The Beaux Arts Ball this year must have been a heartbreaker for Mrs. Stanwood Mencken because after the mediaeval glories of other years it looked kind of like the final dance of the season of the Sea Girt, N. J., Pastime Athletic Club, and after years of cloth of gold what fun is there in summer dresses? Last year folks said that if Mrs. Stanwood Mencken didn't wear cloth of gold to the Beaux Arts Ball then they'd know there was a depression, but she saved the day for the Republican Party by wearing 1931's cloth of gold dress remodelled. There are lots of folks in town who say "God bless Mrs. Stanwood Mencken" every night in their prayers because she's such Coiffure Created by Arnold Fax Snowy White And the Most Admired Head of the Evening! How does her hair retain its silver clearness? The secret is this . . . Mandel's Silver Blue Permanent Wave exclusive at Mandel's! For just as bluing keeps white linens white and blue paper preserves your silver slippers, so our special blue shampoo soap, blue rinse, and blue protect ing papers safeguard your silver locks! The permanent, complete with Solo fingerwave, only $10. MANDEL BROTHERS New Beauty Shops ¦ ^¦v.v--:?.: CHICAGO'S ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND LEADERS compiled by CLENN A. BISHOP and PAUL T. GILBERT An elaborately illustrated volume of 550 pages that fully justify its title. An alive and pulsing city of wonders is described and pictured in this great book. Every home and office should have one. Sold by KROCH'S — BRENTANO'S — ARGUS — WOMRATH GEORGE M. CHANDLER— LORD'S— MARSHALL FIELD'S CARSON PIRIE SCOTT and other leading book-shops EBRUARY. 1933 57 hel ena rubinstein 670 NORTH /MICHIGAN AVENUE You burn your candle at both ends. Tired little lines tell the tale. The winds blow. They dry out sensitive skins and enlarge pores. But beauty wins the victory in the salon of Helena Rubinstein! Skilled hands and exquisite preparations to refresh the tired complexion. Achieve here a glamorous makeup — a chic coiffure. Melt away the bulging inches. A personal consultation does not obligate you. Just call Whitehall 4241 or drop in and talk things over! 1 . For your home treatment. First, a soothing, revitalizing cleans' er. Pasteurized Face Cream Special $1.00 2. Then nourish parched tissues, erase tiny lines with Youthifying Tissue Cream $2.00 o. Finally, refine the pores without drying sensitive skin. Skin Toning Lotion $1.25 HELENA RUBINSTEIN SALON, 670 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago New York Paris SEE YOUR NEW YORK HOTEL IT HOTEL ST. REGIS FIFTH AVE • NEW YORK Let us tell you just how we can make you conifortahle...how near we are to shops, theatres, and the smart residence district. Let us show you pictures of the type of room you may occupy, the formal suites where you may give a party, the smart restaurants, and the fa mous Seaglade for dinner and sup per dancing. If you contemplate a visit to New York, please write to us. DAY-BY-DAY: SINGLE ROOMS, $4, $5, $6 . . . DOUBLE, $7, $8. PARLOR, BEDROOM, BATH, $10, $14, $18, $20 . . . NONE HIGHER Restaurant prices also reduced a staunch defender of the disappearing school of dowager duchessism and looks like Queen Mary except that she dresses better. But your correspondent, unfortunately, can't think of her without remembering a party she gave several years ago which was a "wake" for her Beaux Arts Ball costumes and there they were — half a dozen costumes around the room on dummies — and I can't remember it without getting half a dozen assorted creeps. There was an ad for Camel cigarettes a little while ago on the back covers of the magazines showing a girl wearing a new kind of man's hat. Everything was very nice except that the girl was wearing her wedding ring on her right hand, which may be cricket in Bali but isn't in this great U. S. of ours. It seems the photo was taken by Vogue (and got reversed in the engraving) but the girls who edit Vogue never mince a word and when they saw it said, "That gal is too Broadway for Vogue's pages." So a brave Conde Nast salesman upped and took it to the agency that handled Camel's advertising to sell. The agency man saw the ring on the right hand and protested but the salesman said reverently, "It was taken by Vogue, so it must be right. Maybe it's a new style to wear a wedding ring on the right hand." So the agency man, cowed by fashion authority, bought and ran it. Jack Lonsdale, one of the big real estate brokers in town, was saying down to the drug store the other eve. that the 16 apartment houses in the Park Ave. section his Company manages are 90% rented, which blew your correspondent's toupee off, he thinking they were all about half empty. The smaller apartments are fetching about 50% to 60% of what they did in 1929 and the apartments over six rooms about two-thirds as much. They've had to dispossess about 2% of their tenants, which is very few in these times. One was a doctor, so I guess we all ought to pitch in and pay our doctor bills. The latest gimcrack is a scented necktie which they plan to sell in cross-roads stores and your correspondent hopes he never gets to any of those cross-roads. Traveling at Night And Far into the Morning Hours as Well By Stefan Blake A I ^HERE has already been a tremendous amount of wordage turned A about nightclubs. Maybe you've read some of it. Anyway, we might as well get right down to business and write some more about what to do at the end of the day's occupation when you don't want to go home, or after you've been home and don't want to stay. If you want a classification of nightclubs to be filed for future reference, you might try this : those places where the stage, screen and radio stars take their bows and those places where they don't. There is something about nightclubs that seems to attract great numbers of people. Maybe it's the atmosphere. It's not all clear to us; neither is the atmosphere. Anyway, with the New Year underway, Chicagoans find that, depression or none, night life is still a pretty gay affair in the Big Town. New clubs have opened with bigger and better stars to brighten the canopies and liven the floor shows. And night travellers find that a gala evening at the cafes and hotels can be kept well within the confines of a week's income. Few places continue their couvert, and those that do have it nominally priced. Well, there's the good old College Inn, the Byfield Basement; theres' a place for you, and for us, too. Wednes day nights are Theatrical Nights now, and Ben Bernie and his boys keep the Inn at a pre-Crash tempo. Arrive sober so that you'll be able to appreciate the lighting and the color and design, John Norton's very swell tropical aquarium panels in the main room and the hors d'oeuvre bar. Herr Braun leads the way. Bernie (Old Maestro to the columnists) is the duke of directors, the earl of entertainers and the marquis of M. C.'s, though we can't help but wonder how much longer his fiddle will hold up under the abuse he gives it Wednesday nights applauding for celebs. Dick Stabile (who would make Adolphe Sax feel that his inventive ability wasn't in vain after all)- Pat Kennedy, Frank Prince, little Jackie Heller and the rest of Coach 58 The Chicagoan Bernie's squad contribute mightily to the pleasure of the evening. You'll feel like first-straight herring in the Theatrical Night mob, but it's worth the crowding to see the first-water stage, screen and radio stars who are always there to perform. If you feel that you must dance, stop in on another evening. And there's always the Bal Tabarin for Saturday nights at the Sherman — pleasantly formal, but never overbearingly dignified. Ben Bernie and his lads are there after 11 p. m. The Gold Coast Room at the Drake, with Clyde ("the real") McCoy and his orchestra, is a bright spot, planned to provide a luxuri ous setting for the enjoyment of distinctive entertainment. And don't be misled by the glitter of the name, because it is quite within the spending limits of those who wish to entertain or be entertained hand somely without investing the whole week's supply of eagles for a few hours of pleasure. Vincent Lopez and his famous orchestra are making the Joseph Urban Room at the Congress one of the Town's institutions. Robert Royce sings, and it is his one hundred percent masculine voice that is another reason why you have to put in an early reservations call to Mr. Hoefle, the Urban Room maitre. Mr. Royce was born in California, started singing at the age of seven as a choir boy, never gave much thought to his music until he met Tito Schipa who advised him to go to Milan to study. He followed Tito's wise words and studied under the same professor who had first instructed the operatic star; he continued his study in Florence, Rome and Berlin. Upon his return to this country, Royce was engaged in concert work for two years, specializing in folk songs and touring all the cities of the South and West. Radio claimed him on the West Coast where he remained for four years until last August when Paul Whiteman invited him to appear at his opening in the Biltmore. There he sang as a guest artist, later joining up with the floor show at the Park Central. From there he was escorted to Chicago by Mr. Kaufman of the Congress, and now he is one of the many good reasons for going to the Urban Room. Royce has recently been engaged as a sustaining artist by N. B. C. and expects to appear at the Chicago Theatre early next month. He's about thirty-five years old, married and likes to play golf. Texas Guinan has brought new life to the favorite old Frolics. Dick Lane is the straight-man for the show and feeds Texas and Ralph Cook, the comic. Funnyman Cook is com pletely that, too; even the members of the Frolics service staff laugh at him. La Guinan has with her Easter and Hazelton, ballroom dancers from the legit., Yvonne Bouvier and a mighty sweet little acrobatic dancer, Florence Barlow, and of course her grand gang of typical Guinan Finishing School girls. Frances Williams is now at Mike Fritzel's Chez Paree. It's her first appearance (prior to her short sojourn at the 225 Club) in town since she was here with Oscar Shaw and Harriet Lake in the musical comedy Everybody's Welcome. If there is a smoother, more suave musical comedy star, we should like to meet her. (We should also like to meet Miss Williams.) Ben Pollack and his boys play, Doris Robbins sings, Gomez and Winona, the Collette Sisters and others help make up one of the better floor shows of the Town. At the northside's Vanity Fair, Cliff Winehill is M. C; his comedy and songs are a la Jimmy Durante and his schnozzle, next to Durante's (and that worn by Walter Hampden's Cyrano) is probably the finest, greatest nose in all Schnozzle-dom. He gives a magnificent burlesque of Firechief Ed Wynn. (It Texa- comic of real ability to do that.) Charlie Straight and his band pro vide the music and the floor show is excellent, especially the final cur tain. And we must mention Vanity Fair's interior decoration; it's patterned after the general architectural lines of the World's Fair buildings, and handsomely done. Smart idea. Jack Paige and his six piece orchestra play at M. Teddy's L'Aiglon during the dinner hour and into the evening. Sea food comes to L'Aiglon daily, fresh from New Orleans; and pompano is prepared as few chefs prepare it, and the English sole is entirely different from the usual everyday filet of sole. They wheel around an hor d'oeuvre table, too, with some sixty varieties of rare delicacies. At the Paramount Club there is Sid Lang and his orchestra and a new floor show headed by screen star Mary Nolan, who, as everybody must know by this time, used to be Imogene Wilson of the Follies. There are half a dozen other good acts, and the Paramount is one of the more intimate night harbors of the Town. WHY 0 CHANGED TO MARLBORO CONTEST r ist 1 l PRIZE J Avis I. Qay Chicago. M arlboro_ — a cigarette that is an aristocrat to the last puff — worthy of the illustrious old English name it bears. MAELBORO mica's finzsl aqaiifo CREATED BY PHILIP MORRIS & CO. smith house will be opened Monday, February, Twenty Seventh The old House, at one time campaign head quarters of Abraham Lincoln, is now redecorated. Furnishings in a pleasant departure from usual period reproductions are arranged in a theme of decoration keenly attuned to the present. Costs are based in 1933 buying prices. Visitors cordially invited T. BARRETT SMITH formerly Vice-president of Carlin Comforts, Inc., Interiors and decorative accessores. SOUTHWEST CORNER, HURON 680 NO. MICHIGAN BOULEVARD February, 1933 59 If you prefer a charming, private-home atmosphere, even on short trips to New York, do not forego the pleasure of stopping at the Sherry-Netherland. By the day . . „ AT THE SHERRY- NETHERLAND 1933 rates Rooms, suites ... by the day, week or month. Unexcelled cuisine . . . fixed- price meals. Fifth Ave. at 59th St., on Central Park, New York. Subway, buses. SCULPTU FOR WOMEN WHO DESIRE TO RETAIN THE GRACE, CHARM AND POISE OF YOUTH .... AN INSTITUTION OF DIGNITY AND CHARACTER OFFERS YOU REDUCING TREATMENTS At Low Cost Swedish Zander Institute Scientific Gymnastics and Corrective Exercises Bowman Bldg., 75 W. Van Buren St. Free Parking Tel. Harrison 5581-5582 MADAME HELENA RUBINSTEIN SURVEYING THE BEAUTIES OF THE CENTURY OF PROGRESS FROM THE DIRECTORS' room, her guide is marcia vaughn of The Chicagoan. From Aphrodite to Hormones 20,000 Years in Beauty By Marcia Vaughn IN the old days when Aphrodite won the golden apple for her loveliness, they considered the practice of beauty culture a high art. It was only with the rise of asceticism and the later Reformation that personal beauty care began to be considered a pretty vain and shameful thing. Then the girls had to work fast. No candidates for beauty prizes, they were attractive for a very brief season in the height of their youth, and then they were shelved — as they continued to be shelved for many years. An old maid at twenty-five, white caps at thirty, and a woman's active days were over. But about thirty years ago an energetic young medical student started thinking about fading complexions and early aging, and decided to do something about them. Helena Rubinstein, leaving Europe to visit an aunt in Australia, was particularly impressed by the aging effects which a change to a dry, hot climate wrought in the famous roseleaf complexions of Englishwomen. ohe had a formula for a cream which had been given to her mother by Modjeska, and this cream she made up for her friends in Australia. It wasn't long before the demand spread from friend to friend, and then to others, so that she undertook a business venture which had tremendous ramifications. The first modern beauty salon was opened in Melbourne. From there the Rubinstein salons spread a new cult of beauty all over the world, through many salons building a business conservatively esti' mated as worth thirty cool millions, and leading the host of establish' ments which have sprung up in the past twenty years devoted to the beautification of womankind. The rise, the fall, and the second rise of beauty culture really deserve a book which parallels the history of mankind. But Madame Rubinstein plans a more graphic presentation of this history in an exhibit at the Century of Progress. Visiting the Fair grounds recently she planned a demonstration of what beauty has meant and does mean and will mean to women everywhere. Perhaps the most interesting part of the history is its modern phase which is closely related to our own faces, our own figures, and our own youth. For Madame Rubinstein predicts that in twenty years there will be no old women — no, not even middle-aged ones. For the moderns have a few tricks up their sleeves of which Aphrodite and Cleopatra and their sisters knew nothing. The moderns have great laboratories for experimentation, great scientists for consultation, the resources of all the world from which 60 The Chicagoan to cull precious ingredients. Some ingredients are simple household things — thousands of pounds of grapes are used yearly by the Rubin stein laboratories. Others are very precious and brought to the factories from every corner of the earth. There are rare oils and essences of a thousand flowers. There are the rejuvenating hormones of South Sea turtles in youth-restoring hormone creams. Great quantities of water-lilies are grown on California lakes just for the essence of their buds which forms a valuable ingredient in certain creams. All these will be represented in a decorative mural which is to form the background of the display and consulting rooms which to our feminine mind sound like one of the most exciting spots in the World's Fair. TRAIN DOWN AND FRESHEN UP Spring Figures, Coiffures and Faces {Begin on page 39) is beastly hard, tired eyes squint in all the bluster and dust. Helena Rubinstein, in a recent visit to her salon here, delivered a few seasonal hints which will do much to make the Chicago winter a more pleasant one. Ninety-nine out of a hundred women in this here town suffer from dry skin and need nourishing preparations. A rich penetrating cleans ing cream should be followed at night by nourishing Touthifying Tissue Cream. Two cotton pads, soaked in warm Extrait and placed over the eyes for a brief rest will do marvels to restore the fresh look to tired eyes and to ward off the tiny lines which appear about the eyes after strain and exposure to sun and wind. If you are going in for winter sports a very protective foundation such as Sun and Wind- proof Cream is a great help. In the evening or for dress occasions you'll enjoy the flattering Cream of Lilies foundation. But be sure to use some foundation. A delightful rejuvenating measure either in the salon treatment or for home use is Helena Rubinstein's Herbal Mas\, a soothing cream which nourishes while it tightens the muscles and refines the pores and does wonders to draw out those tired, tired lines. It is easily used at home and gratifyingly effective once or twice a week to keep you fresh looking all the time. Madame Rubinstein also is showing her luscious new Peachbloom powder, a warm flesh tone which gives a natural finish and glow to the complexion; and her gay Poppy Red lipsticks and rouge, a vivid tint with a true blood tone and no purple shadows to give you the nice natural bloom which is fashionable now — thank goodness — in stead of the exotic colors of the past few seasons. In the charming Lanchere salon at Marshall Field's they do things to your hair which are both beneficial and smart — a combination sometimes hard to find. The hair treatments are delightful and even with a simple shampoo your hair isn't just soused with soap and water and then plastered into shape under a gooey setting lotion. The treatments are exhilarating, with gentle stimulating massage and a divine herbal tonic — if you need it, nourishment oil is massaged into the scalp under mild steam to urge it more thoroughly into the cells — and all in all your hair has a natural sheen and a healthy one after it emerges from the hairdresser's hands. The coiffures illustrated show some of the spring suggestions of Charles and Philip, a smart pair of hairdressers who are a joy to the gels who want something different, individual and chic. If you feel that gray hairs, no matter how silvery and beautiful, make you grandmotherly when there's spring in your soul there's nothing to do but get them out of your system. But do it safely and expertly. Practically all the best salons do it with Xotox which gently produces a natural look and not the hard purple black top which is almost worse than a bald head. The application should be handled by experienced people too. In the Mandel Beauty Shops there is a special staff for this work and a specially built room, so lighted and papered in black that daylight and evening lights are perfectly reflected, and if you look natural in the salon you'll look natural in the most brilliant sun. Also at the Condos Salons, in the Pittsfield building downtown, and at the south side shop, the T^otox work is very carefully done under the supervision of Madame Condos who will consult, test, and work on gray tresses until they are back to youth again. The fastest passage . . . only possible on the BREMEN, EUROPA . . . lead ing the fleet of the year to Europe ... sailing in rapid succession with the swift dc luxe COLUMBUS to England. France and Germany. Go one way Lloyd Express . . . Prolong the pleasure of the other passage in Lloyd Cabin Liners ... BERLIN, STUTTGART. STEUBEN, DRESDEN . . . to and from England, Ireland, France and Germany . . . weekly. NORTH GERMAN LLOYD Apply 130 West Randolph Street, Chicago, III. Phone: Franklin 4130, or your local agent February, 1933 61 CHICAGO'S ADDR6SS There is a certain distinction in the very act of choosing a home at Hotel Ambass ador or Ambassador East — the permanent residence of Chicago's social leaders — the accepted choice of visiting notables. Superlative accommodations to meet the requirements cf every guest, from hotel rooms and kitchenettes to extensive suites. 1300 NORTH STATE PARKWAY WORLD WIDE SHORT WAVE RECEPTION IN YOUR HOME WITH the new HAMMARLUND COMET Custom Built "PRO" The "PRO" holdx honor position in the service of the U. S. and Canadian governments, leading air-transp jrt and steamship companies, police depart ments, and key stations of broadcasting networks— faithfully performing their most exacting tasks The "PRO" is extraordinarily sensitive, keenly selective, quiet and easy to tune, and moderately priced for a custom-built receiver of the highest order. CHICAGO RADIO APPARATUS CO. 415 S. DEARBORN ST. Dearborn al Van Buren HARrison 8276 TEXAS GUINAN Queen of the Night Clubs "and her gang" with RICHARD LANE RALPH COOK KITTY O'REILLY YVONNE BOUVIER FROLICS CAFE 1 8 E. 22nd St. Victory 701 1 Dance Until Dawn Three Shows Nightly In her Walton Place salon Elizabeth Arden is showing several bright new items, among them a grand addition to her versatile group of six lipsticks which blend with costume colors so nicely. This is a lipstick for redheads which ought to be snatched up by all the girls who have had difficulty finding a lip rouge which won't clash with their own coloring. It looks coppery until you put it on but on the lips it is an indescribable tone which does things to bring out the coppery glint in hair without making the lips look coppery. It is lovely too with deep suntan and for outdoors when you don't want a startling red to clash with your open air look. Another mysterious tone is her violet nail polish which isn't an unearthly looking violet but a deep rose with violet tones something lovely with violets, purples and grays in spring costumes. And there's a new edition of her color chart with the new spring colors in clothes and the correct makeup for each shown by a twirl of the finger. Nice to prop on your makeup table if you want to do a really artistic turn out. The charts may be had for the asking, either at the salon or by writing to The Chicagoan. 'Body Studios HELENA RUBINSTEIN, 670 N. Michigan. Electric bath cabinet, Swedish massage, solarium, electric blankets, exercises. BODY CONTOUR SHOP, Mandel Brothers. Steam cabinet, special reducing solution in garments, massage. ELIZABETH ARDEN, 70 East Walton Place. Massage, Ardena bath treatments, exercises, mechanical rollers, bicycles, etc. THE JANUS METHOD, 8 S. Michigan. Steam bath, massage system. SILHOUETTE SHOP, Charles A. Stevens. Steam baths, Wilson reducing courses. SWEDISH ZANDER INSTITUTE, 75 W. Van Buren. The Swedish Zander exercise machines and methods in physiotherapy, for general health building and obesity correction. POSTL'S CLUB FOR WOMEN, 606 S. Michigan. Exercise courses now adapted to the feminine figure, instruction in swim ming, treatments for underweight and overweight. -Another salon which the former grays swear by, when they get confidential, is the establishment of Madame Elisc in the Mailers Building. She is one of the most artistic manipulators in the profession, using either the Notox Inecto method or tinting preparations of her own. Her facial preparations, incidentially, deserve a little study of their own. They are exquisite and scientific, prepared here from certain German formulae which Madame Elise procured abroad. You'll enjoy her facials and hair treatments of which I'll tell more at greater length in next month's column. TROUSSEAU THOUGHTS Gifts and Announcements By The Hostess THERE are dozens of ways of saying it, but the important thing is that it is being said in dozens of homes. Engage ment announcements are popping all about us, so it seems seasonable to poke about a bit for bright little trousseau gifts. And it isn't too early to plan the really unusual wedding gift now, instead of dashing forth in a fever a few weeks before the wedding to despatch another pair of candlesticks or the eleventh bonbon dish. On page 45 of this issue is a group of interesting new items which it would be wise to snatch up now. As the future bride begins her linen store her friends can pick up the most engaging trifles of something rather grand in linens and laces for less than a third ot the cost of such things four or five years ago. The bride of 1933 is a pretty lucky bride — she will get treasures for the same sum which brought us older fry guest towels. You'll enjoy the new things Litwinsky is showing, the little gifts as well as the magnificent cloth illustrated on our gift page. A charming gift for the trousseau is the bride s chest of blankets prepared by Kenwood Mills. These are gaily packaged and include harmonizing colors in as many pieces as you wish to give. Their blankets, of course, are pretty heavenly in soft wooliness and in exquisite coloring. Every bride should have 62 The Chicagoan What th, well dressed beefsteak will wear JrOUR a tablespoon of Lea & Perrins Sauce on your steak twenty minutes be- forecooking,rubitinandletitstand.O add a few drops up to half a teaspoon to each portion at table. Either way will give you such beefsteak as men dream of— because Lea & Perrins brings out every last whisper of natural flavor. Buy a bottle and try it. Lea & Perrins glorifies roasts and chops, too. FREE — A new 50-page book "Success In Seasoning" gives 140 ways to please men. Yours for the ask ing. Write a postal to Lea & Perrins, Inc., 244 West Street, New York. LEA & PERRINS Sauce THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE CIGARETTE BURNS MOTH HOLES-TEARS re woven to perfection in Clothes, Linens, Rugs, Furniture DON'T WEAR SHINY CLOTHES We remove the shine and make them look like new. Call and Delivery Service on the Near North Side AMERICAN WEAVING CO. Established 1905 .". North Wabash Ave. Room 1501 Dearborn 1693-4 in her trousseau at least one or two of their beautiful throws, woven in an openwork effect, satin bound and as light as air though they keep one as warm as toast. They are extremely decorative with almost any type of furnishings. One of the first things future brides like to settle upon when they plan their home is their flatware pattern, so that they will be ready when indulgent parents or relatives begin reaching for their checkbook. Rogers, Lunt d? bowlen have an interesting guide for the wondering girl in a book which shows how to fit silver patterns to the decorative spirit of the other fur nishings. Both flatware and dishes are shown in designs varying to harmonize with interiors of different periods, from Tudor to mod ern, and one can glean quite a few interesting general decorative ideas as well as silver thoughts from it. A booklet which helps decide another important question is the bride's book of information on announcements, cards, etc., issued by Linweave. This discusses every possible angle of the question and is really modern though a firm stickler for unalterable tradi tions, and it's considered indispensable by such authorities as the Wedding Embassy, Emily Post, and others. .TOR the very, very new gift there's a collection of hand forged aluminum which is quite, quite knockout. This is being produced at the Wendell August Forge in Pennsylvania, from designs by some of the finest artists in the country, and is on display at Hipp and Coburn. In the first place, it doesn't look like pots and pans aluminum, but is exquisitely fashioned, and though modern in design it has the sheen of old pewter or dull old silver or some thing akin to that. Quite indescribable — you must see it to appre ciate its beauty. The pieces illustrated on the gift page are only a few of those available. There are any number of interesting trays, bowls, gay little fingerbowls and ashtrays, and a flock of aluminum furniture which is strikingly modern, strong though light, and amazingly comfortable. The modern bride will enjoy candelabra, of course, if they are distinctive — either very grand old silver or something very strik ingly modern. The modern U-shaped pair produced by Will and Baumer, who also have Waxels to fit into them, are inexpensive and smart and make a bright little gift to the engaged girl no matter what her later elaborate treasures will be. If you are planning any gift-giving at all to brides, to others or to yourself you shouldn't miss the collection of treasures from the Marian Gheen Estate and from the establish ment of Miss Gheen, Inc., which is being shown at Grant's Art Galleries and will be sold at auction from the fifteenth to the eighteenth of this month. Some of them are shown on the gift page but there are hundreds of others. Magnificent pieces of furniture such as a set of Chippendale chairs, superbly carved in the ribbon pattern; a Heppelwhite bench exquisitely carved and covered in old flowered brocade; a black commode lacquered in Chinese design; and many smaller pieces — Staffordshire figures, Dresden pieces, some Chien Lung vases, some charming old footstools and many, many fascinating things to gloat over and seize for future joy in giving or keeping. HALF PRICE OFFER! • 50c bottle Abbott's Bitters for 25c! Clip coupon below A chance to get Abbott's Bitters below cost! Simply send 25c in stamps or coin and this famous tonic and appetizer will be mailed to you. Adds flavor to foods . . . that certain something to ginger ale ! BITTERS JB| I C. W. Abbott Co. n 9 j HI Baltimore, Md. ^m\ x " ! i a"'"'- - i I (1'>- State I L I fl) Heac/quarfe/tL Connoisseurs of fine beverages want the very best. We are sole distributors (or a carefully selected line of imported and domestic quality beverages. folsteify Billy Baxter: Self-stirring beverages, Club Soda, Lime and Lemon Soda, Root Beer, Sarsaparilla and Ginger Ale. O'Keefe's: Dry Ginger Ale. Quality beverages. Geroliteiner: A natural, sparkling table water, bottled al Gerolstein, Germany. Schweppe'i: From London. Club Soda. Ginger Ale. Dry Ginger Beer. Quinine Water. Lemon and Lime Squash. We can supply all popular brands. Orders before 10 A.M. delivered to your door same day. No charge for suburban deliveries. OTTO SCHMIDT PRODUCTS CO. IMPORTERS I229 S.Wabash Ave. CALUMET 4230 SPOON IS THE ENEMY OF THE HIGH-BALL Mr. Kountz, Headmaster of The Billy Baxter School of Carbonated Drinks, originated the self-stirring theory — he learned that a drink may be stirred without the aid of a spoon — learned that to agitate with a spoon stirred out the bubbles and made flat the drink — hence the phrase which heads this advertisement. Billy Baxter Club Soda Billy Baxter Ginger Ale If once you use high -pressure, self-stirring Billy Baxter, you will never again be satisfied with low-pressure beverages. Send for booklet — it tells all. THE RED RAVEN CORPORATION CHESWICK, PA. OTTO SCHMIDT PRODUCTS CO. Distributors for Chicago Call Calumet 42:50 and learn all 50 »»»"« frenchmen "w ran I he wrong I Vermouth Mouiiuin is the indispensable ingre dient lor smoothness and flavor. Frenrh .t Italian styles. At all dealers. mm gt£ouquit)'s IJeitttoutl} For free Recipe Book, address Mouquin, Inc., 2I9 East Illinois Street, Chicago. Superior 2615. RENT ffrS? BOOKS Books on Chicago — nonfiction — fiction — exotic & unusual. We deliver and call for books at no extra charge .... CHICAGO'S PUBLIC SERVICE LIBRARY rranklin 370£ 7 W. Madison St. SCOTTISH TERRIERS PUPPIES Eligible for registry in Anu-rie in Kennel Club. First three genera tions of pedigree n0\v most fatuous Only $40 Each 815 Colfax St. Evanston, 111. February, 1933 63 &L 9l*u> ^/o*£ diatd of i/uire Ksfu&cm * * * * A A A A A A A A A Located just a lew steps Irom I lttn Ave. Exquisitely furnished . . . lor transient and permanent residence. J. he Aiadiscm restau rant has justly earned an international repu tation lor its lood and courteous service. At our readjusted tariff Economy Becomes Smart Socially RATES Oingle Irom . . . $5 .Double Irom . $7 ouites Irom . . $10 15 EAST 58tk STREET at Madison Ave., New York BERTRAM WEAL, Managing Directoi BUSINESS SECRETARY OR COUNSELOR —To the Lady of Affairs — concerned with Investment, Income. Real Estate and Estate Management By gentleman of education. conservatism and refinement, with years of valuable exiieri- enoe in above matters. Occasional, whole or part time. Chicago and suburbs. Refer ences. Bond if desired. Please investigate — no obligation — rea sonable. Address Box 10 THE CHICAGOAN 107 South Dearborn Street Chicago, 111. Qffvi, rim aft vwyltt*^ ia wX at uraqtauyu'L Mu4 av ;,rp dl tb Umiu guud tta -jwd u vju^ q wql Whether she is starting off in a three room apartment or in a duplex penthouse nearly every bride gets into a glow about bright kitchen things and interesting gadgets. She likes to feel that her household will run smoothly and efficiently and show the doubting mothers and aunts that twentieth century house keeping is a matter of intelligent management and little drudgery. For the informal late suppers and Thursday night pickups, too, the more things she has to help her the happier a leetle woman she will be. For instance, one can have quite a gay time with things like the Sunbeam can opener which clutches a can to its bosom and with one twirl takes the top off neatly; with their electric food chopper (grinding anything with a hand chopper is always a boresome job) and the knife sharpener attachment which produces a keen glitter ing edge at one whisk. And, of course, the Mixmaster which does just about every kitchen task except washing dishes. Cooks just stay forever rather than separate themselves from their Mixmaster once they have become accustomed to mashing, whipping, stirring, extracting juice and doing dozens of other things with this helper. Then there's the Wafflewitch, a decorative and efficient piece which is a lot of fun for informal waffle suppers or Sunday breakfast parties. But more next month on the bride and her friends. THE BIG PARADE Now Forming for March Fourth (Begin on page 19) (b) the fire will be out within sixty days (c) THE fire has now burned as low AS IT CAN (D) I HAVE STOPPED THE FIRE (E) THE MORITORIUM WILL STOP THE FIRE (F) I MUST STAY ON THE BURNING DECK FOR FOUR MORE YEARS OR IT WILL BURN WORSE (G) I SOLEMNLY WARN YOU NOT TO LIFT MY FEET OFF THE DANGEROUSLY BURNING DECK (H) I AM GLAD TO COOPERATE WITH MY SUC CESSOR BUT INSIST ON KEEPING MY FOOT IN IT TO THE LAST MOMENT, AND INTEND TO BE BACK IN 1936 CONGRESS ON WOODEN HORSES RIDING THE WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND WHICH PLAYS WAGNERIAN MUSIC IN WHICH THE HERO SIEGFRIED KISSES A HAPPY BRUENHILDE IN 1928 AND LEAVES HER IN 1933 IN A STATE OF COMA SENATOR BORAH, IN PURPLE TOGA PURSUED BY SENATOR HUEY LONG ON ROLLER SKATES WALKING DELEGATION FROM MUDVILLE BRINGING THE MIGHTY CASEY'S BAT TO PRESENT IT TO THE CHIEF NOAH'S ARK Notes on Field. Museum (Begin on page 28) appear in technical publications regularly sent to 1,2)0 individuals and institutions, in a series of popular leaflets that go to a mailing list of more than 1,000, and in other books and pamphlets. Thus that which has roots in all parts of the world and which blooms in Chicago, in turn sends its blossoms broad cast. Those which go to the schools consist of loan exhibits rein- Architectural Harmony In stormy seasons, a well-de signed canopy stands as a mark of elegance and polite concern ... a gracious ges ture of hospitable considera tion. In Carpenter Fine Canopies, art is combined with superior materials and workmanship to achieve a satisfying sense of architectural fitness and harmony. Rental canopies are available for weddings and all manner of spe cial occasions. Circular on request. GEO-BeARPErfTER^eO. Craftsmen in Canvas 440 NORTH WELLS STREET Chicago SUPerior 9700 Self • Consciousness Overcome Katherine Whitney's method of eighteen years of success ful coaching Is unlaue and modern and the results are positive and immediate. Develop greater charm, per sonality, poise and popular- • ity. Improve your diction — vocabulary — conversation and public speaking. INFERIORITY COMPLEX MASTERED Katherine Whitney will be glad to personally explain her abilities to YOU— no obliga tion of course. Fees are extremely moderate. Private instruction. Katherine Whitney Social Authority Edgewater Beach Hotel Longbeach 6000 COUTHOUI FOR TICKETS 64 The Chicagoan ORIENT near in dollars! A trip to Japan! China! The Philippines! So near in] dollars you can take it. Larse, fast motor ships . . . with every modern con venience . . . new to the last shin ing rivet. ¦ FROM THE PACIFIC COAST • FirstClass . 310up Cabin Class . 250] Second Class 190 up Tourist Cabin 130 ¦ NEW LOW RATES FOR 'ROUND THE WORLD TOURS Hawaii, Japan, China, Philippines, Straits Settlements, Ceylon, Arabia, Japan, Italy, France, Spain, England — 20,000 miles of new adventure — $437. up for Tourist Cabin -Second Class, in cluding trans-continental railroad fare in America. Write Department 64 NYK- LINE (JAPAN MAIL) One of the world's largest & oldest shipping companies 40 No. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. or any Cunard Line office Consult your local tourist agent. He knows. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS Request has been made by the New York Pub lic Library for copies of THE CHICAGOAN for June and July, 1932, to complete the Libra ry's file of the maga zine. Informed that printings of these issues have been ex hausted, the Library suggests that readers who have no further use of these copies pre sent them. They may be addressed to Mr. E. H. Anderson, Di rector, New York Pub lic Library, Fifth Ave nue and 42nd Street, New York N. Y. forced by occasional lectures, illustrated and otherwise. Since these itinerant exhibits arc changed every two weeks during the working year, each child who finishes ei^ht years ol grammar school makes the acquaintance of you can figure out for yourself how many cases. The contents include mammals, birds, insects, fishes, reptiles and other natural history subjects, as well as models of prehistoric animals, mines, wild flowers in habitat settings, and exhibits showing the sue cessive steps in the preparation of food products, the manufacture of materials for clothing, the various stages in the making of glass, paper, chinaware, linoleum and other industrial products that come within the daily use or observation of the child. All are minutely accurate, three dimensional and made amazingly life like by means of a diorama type of background showing the environment of the specimens exhibited. In general subjects are limited to features of the region within one hundred miles of Chicago in order that the child may become familiar with those things which he is likely to encounter. This is the work of the N. W. Harris Public School Extension, through whose agency the museum is in constant circulation in all the public schools, a number of private schools, settlement houses, boys' clubs and library branches. Six cases have traveled as far as Los Angeles, where they are on permanent exhibition in the Museum of History, Art and Science. So the Field Museum, like that which is so prevalent that we will not mention any name, we have always with us, whether we are school children in Chicago or globe trotters in Turkestan. It is a part of the city, a part of the Century of Progress, a part of the culture of the world. URBAN PHENOMENA A Tour of the Old World (Begin on page 29) and slickers in the dining hall for an English buffet breakfast, then starting out with the dogs and "beaters" for a day's shooting . . . climbing over fences, walking through fields with a soft rain falling . . . fog on Welsh hills, the sharp report of a shotgun, the dull thud of a pheasant fallen. Coming in cold, hungry and pleasantly tired and gathering around the fire for tea. Feeling like a New Person after our holiday but being distinctly seek of packing and unpacking suitcases and trunks we're Homeward Bound and perfectly content to lead the Simple Life Again. We have cleverly managed to leave something or other at pradically every place we've visited. We've completely lost a piece of luggage . . . but we don't know where. We are absolutely broke and we have taken hundreds of feet of "movies" Upsidedown. We've had FUN . . . BUT . . . There is No Place Like Home! 'Bve now. SUB-URBAN PHENOMENA Occurrences in the Suburbs (Begin on page 30) can think of beginning with that letter. The time limit is always a minute (have you a friend with a stop watch?) proper nouns are not allowed, and par for the various letters is as follows: thirty for A, B, C, D, E, F, G, L, M, N, P, R, S, T, and W; twenty-five for I, O, and H; twenty for U and V; fifteen for J, K, Q, and Y; ten for Z and six for X. If it sounds pretty simple to you, just try it — especially with an audience — and see how blank your mind can become (believe it or not) when under pressure. JACQUES FRENCH RESTAURANT ONE HALF BLOCK S. E. of DRAKE HOTEL 180 E. DELAWARE PLACE 9 Where you will find very tasty French Food and Prompt Service. 9 We serve the famous C h i p p e w a Spring Water with meals. Dinner de luxe 5:30 to 9:30p.m., $1.50. Lunch eons 11:30 to 3 p. m., 60c and 75c. Luxurious Banquet Room Available for Bridge Parties, 1! an q u e t s. New wood Dancing Floor. Most reasonable rates. Phone Delaware 0904 a cordial welcome ve just returned from New York. I've bought the most stunning Spring dresses and suits, the smartest apparel we've shown in seasons. The ta i 1 1 eu r s for strolling on the boulevard, the gay fluffy things for the dance or Sun day Evening party, the gowns for the bride and her maids are all here. My Sunny French Salon, set in the heart of "Spanish Court," is a de- ghtful place to pend the after noon. Drive out some day soon and have tea with me. A treat is in store for you: shopping in comfort away from the hubbub of the Big City. And a special sur prise! Our price range starts at 19.75. Come! Spend as ong as you like. Don't hesitate to drop in and look around. N.A.HANNA "Spanish Court" WILMETTE Address THE HOSTESS Inquiries pertaining to the essentials of smart hospitality receive her personal consideration and immediate atten' tion. The Chicagoan BRIDGE CRUISE MARCH 3rd West Indies & Central America 19 DAYS— ALL EXPENSE— CHICAGO BACK TO CHICAGO 1165.50 Certified Kridge Teachers Association, Palmer House, Chicago, or call United Fruit Company, State 774-1 February. 65 horeland Parties are s tifLisk parties — always! Style is the making of your party. Simple or lavish — formal or informal — the individuality that you so much desire can be expressed solely through style. Hotel Shoreland — the accepted center of social activity — pro vides not only a variety of smart settings for your private party — but offers the experience and co operation of a perfected staff to work with you, to create ideas that will assure you a party of recognized style. Your guests will enthusiastically approve, for it will be a party stylish beyond the price you are asked to pay! .Shoreland. Chicago's Foremost Place to Live Chicago's Foremost Place to Dine 55th Street at the Lake Phone Plaza 1000 Read Current Entertainment A concisely critical survey of the civil' ized interests of the Town on pages 6 and 8 of this and every issue of THE CHICAGOAN AMONG THE MOTORS Precision Tests and the Show Barometer By Clay' Burgess WE used to think that precision meant accuracy — being very careful, particular, such as carrying out a mathematical prob- lem to the fourth decimal point, or speaking distinctly, perhaps slowly, as Mrs. Wagoner, our eighth-grade school teacher used to do. (She was very irritable and, we always claimed, dyed her hair.) It seems, though, that we've never been especially precise in our personal definition of precision. It means, in a rough way, what we'd always thought, but it means a great deal more than that, too. It means being accurate to one-half of one-thousandth of an inch, to one ten- thousandth of an inch, to (by gad!) one-millionth of an inch. And that is being accurate! (And we dare anybody to jump up and say, "Oh, it is, is it?") Well, we certainly learned about precision at the Packard exhibit at the Edgewater Beach Hotel. After viewing the Packard Gold Cup Engine which has won Annual Gold Cup Races nine times in the last eleven years; a Diesel Aircraft Engine, cut open so you can see how the parts work; a Packard marine engine from Gar Wood's Miss America X, the fastest speed boat in the world (it has four such motors, developing 1600 h.p. — more power than three locomotives of the type used to haul the Twentieth Century — and attaining a speed of 124.91 m.p.h.) ; and trophies and cups, we were shown the nineteen or twenty precision tests. There were gauges, comparators, indi cators, testers for hardness and strength of metals, wood, upholstering materials, ball bearing end play, transmission gear clearance and tooth depth. The degree of accuracy of these various instruments was the most amazing thing we've seen since Pat O'Dea used to kick field goals for Wisconsin. TOR instance, Packard employs a light ray machine to maintain the accuracy of its precision gauges, instruments and Johansson blocks. It has the finest calibration known to man — one-millionth of one inch, less than the one-thousandth part of the finest hair. Its rigid test of a standard employs the most permanent and exact measuring unit known — the length of a light wave. That seems incredible, but it's a fact. And other facts are : one hundred and twenty-three gauges are used in making four hundred and forty-seven inspections of the crankshaft before it is finally accepted in a Packard motor. Sounds and noises of all kinds (of motors, transmissions, axles, bearings and other units and parts) are accurately measured as to their intensity, frequency, duration and quality by the acoustimeter. (A package of cigarettes dropped to the floor before the microphone makes the indicating arrow swing 'way over.) The metallurgical microscope can magnify to one thousand times actual size; it's used to detect imperfections of mate rials and to examine grain structure of metals. Packard measure ment gauges of all sizes are accurately tested by the optometer com parator. The fact that this instrument measures accurately the deflection caused by the slight pressure of one's finger on a short steel bar two inches in diameter makes one realize its ability to record superfine dimensions. 1 HE new Hupmobiles are known as silver anni versary series in celebration of factory's twenty-fifth year. It is an entirely new six-cylinder car mounted on a 121 -inch wheelbase and equipped with a 90 horsepower engine and is offered by Hupmobile for 1933. In addition, two thoroughly modernized editions of the eight- cylinder car, which featured the line for last year, are included. This new car is undoubtedly the greatest value that has carried the Hupp name. J he 1933 Buicks are longer and wider, provid ing a higher degree of stability and riding comfort. The center of gravity has been materially lowered. This with the longer wheelbases, has enabled the designers to extend themselves to the use of new air streamlines. Two outstanding impressions are conveyed by a thorough inspec tion of these new Buicks. One is the strict adherence to quality, both in design and manufacture. The second is the close harmony existing between the engineers and body designers. Every feature of the car reflects this co-ordination. The CHICAGOAN Worlds Fair Book THE CHICAGOAN is pleased to announce completion of arrange ments for publication of The Chicagoan's World's Fair Book on June 1, 1933. A foretaste of the type of context distinguish ing the volume — which will be published inde pendently of the regu larly dated monthly is sues of the magazine — Kas been afforded read ers in the articles and pictures by Mr. Milton S. Mayer and Mr. A. George Miller in this and the three preceding numbers. r\ Century of Progress Exposition brings world attention to focus upon Chicago in 1933. The Chicagoan World's Fair Book will bring A Century of Progress Exposition to focus for contemporary Chicagoans, for visiting thousands and for pos terity. The CHICAGOAN 66 The Chicagoan Westinghouse Announces a Low- Priced Humidifier and IVinterAir- Conditioner that operates for a few cents a Day DANG EH DRY AIR • Each winter you and your family sutler, perhaps unknowingly, from the dry air in your modern, heated home. Because everything becomes dried out, the air's content of micro scopic dust particles increases. This dry air with its invisible dust, is breathed into throats and lungs. It dries and irritates the mucous mem branes. This drying irritation, authori ties hold largely responsible for many of the common colds from which wc suffer in winter — and much of the sickness which reaches its annual peak during the winter starts with ordinary colds. The Amazing Result of Westinghouse Scientific Research Now a compact, radically efficient portable humidifier joins the long list of Westinghouse achievements which arc helping to revolutionize American living conditions — bringing new- standards of comfort, convenience and economy to American homes. It is destined to mark a milestone in scien tific service for American well-being. So Silent You Scarcely Hear It . . . Yet ioo Quarts of Water an Hour Wash the Air You Breathe Merely connect this amazing portable humidifier to any electric outlet in your SAFE WITH HUMIDIFIED CONDITIO N E D A I 11 home, apartment or office . . . fill it with water each day . . . and forget it. Its three and a half gallons of water circulate at the rate of 100 quarts of water an hour, washing 200 cubic feet of air a minute! The water is filtered constantly to remove the dust, dirt and odors it washes out. No fog, mist or visible moisture is given off. There is no trace of damp ness around it. But the air is helped to absorb moisture to a comfort able, healthful humidity. The amount which it absorbs is self- regulated, automatically ... it absorbs most when • • • • • * j • Westinghouse the air is very dry and less as humid ity approaches the comfort zone. LOW IN PRICE This remarkable humidifier is so low in price that every home can afford one. It uses less electricity than a Mazda lamp — costs but a few cents a day to use. Mail the coupon /or lit eral tire — or /or a dem onstration in your home or office. \\ hSTiNGiiousr, Rlkctric cV Mfg. Co. 20 North Wacker Drive. Chicago Send literature on the Westinghouse 1 lumidiiier. (.heck it you \\ish a demonstration. lVMIDIFIBR Name Addre: I City e f^ \. ^y or yovi who purchase with discern ment, there is one guide which you can fully trust. It is the time-tried axiom, "The very best economy abides in quality? Many a Cadillac owner has voluntarily said that appreciation of this truth dictated his selection. And, in so choosing, he has signified conviction that Cadillac's designers have achieved their aim. . . . Cadillac, for more than thirty years, has striven unremittingly to earn for its products the approbation of those who cherish fine things. This high purpose has brought forth a succession of motor cars of literally superlative worth. . . . This, unquestionably, is true of the three superb cars which now cany the Cadillac crest. More skillfully designed and built; featuring, among many advancements, Fisher No Draft Ventilation, individually- controlled; and finer in every detail — they are obviously for those who want the finest quality, and recognize its economy. . . . So, whether you seek luxury, or performance, or inherent soundness — you will find it in fuller measure in these new Cadillacs. . . . The V-8 and V-12 are on display at all Cadillac-La Salle dealers' — while the V-16, limited to 400 cars for the current year, is custom built to order. Cadillac list prices begin at $2695, f. o. b. Detroit. CADILLAC MOTOR CAlt COMPANY . . . Detroit, Michigan Chicago Branch: 2301 South Michigan Avenue *• GEN E It A I. M O T O It S V A L U E